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rated:
My file and print sharing no longer works - and it used to
Perhaps you bought a new router. You have internet access, but I can no longer share files or printers. Here's hot to fix this.

Chances are that you have firewall software on each PC that needs to be reconfigured.

Here's why the IP addresses that your new router assigns dynamically are likely different than the range of addresses your old router assigned.

For example, your old router may have assigned addresses beginning with 192.168.1.100, while your new router may assign addresses beginning with 192.168.2.1 All perfectly OK, and there will be no problem with your internet access.

If you have a software firewall installed on your PC, then you would have previously configured your firewall on each PC to "trust" PCs in the old range.

The solution is to change the software firewall to trust PCs in the new range.

Check the IP address assignments that your router hands out and follow the instructions for your particular firewall to configure the firewall

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I just installed a router and my internet no longer works

I get the message "Cannot contact DHCP server"

General Troubleshooting

Under most conditions, ethernet devices are not hot swappable. Therefore, you will not connect if you simply swap /add devices.

The simplest way to get all the devices to refresh the IP addresses you need is to power everything down, and wait a couple of minutes for the IP addresses to "clear"

Then, starting at the wall, power each device up in turn, and wait for it to finish its power cycle, self/check before powering up the next device.

e.g.

1. Power everything down
2. Wait two minutes
3. Power up the cable /dsl modem. Wait for it to fully complete its self check
4. Power up the router. Wait for it to fully complete its self check
5. Power up your computer

If your logon information (if DSL/PPPoE) and other settings are correct. You should be good to go. However, I recommend you see post #2, if you have wireless, to ensure that your network is secure

If this did not solve your problem, then

1. For test purposes, disable your software firewall
2. Check your IP addresses
3. Create a new thread and post it in the computer forum (not this thread), providing all the details that are requested in sticky #1

rated:
My wireless network does not reach far enough. What can I do?

1. Relocate the wireless router to a central and/or higher location. Or if your router is on a lower floor, try turning the router upside down. (Routers tend to broadcast their signals out and down, so if you have yours in the basement, the floors above are receiving little signal. Flipping it over can help)
2. Use wireless range extender
3. Add an external antenna
4. Install a Wireless repeater
5. If the option is available in your router, then increase power
6. If a Linksys router, upgrade with third party firmware from Sveasoft's Opensource firmware or HyperWRTthat allows you to boost power. HyperWRT is simpler to use, but has fewer other options
7. Install a remote access point, connected via wired ethernet to the distant router
8. Install a Wireless router and turn off DHCP. Then connect via wired ethernet to the main router.Do not use the WAN port for the uplink in this situation. Only use the LAN ports and the wireless capability
9. Replace router with and 802.11 pre-N router, which is reported to extend range, even when working with legacy b and g devices
10. If you have Wifi router that supports WDS Bridging (Belkin, Buffalo, Linksys) then you can buy another of the same Router, and follow the directions from the manufacturer to turn on Bridging. Leave the box "do not allow clients to connect" unchecked and your routers will talk wirelessly and extend (double?) the range of your existing network. More detail's about bridging the Belkin Wireless Wifi Router 7230-4 F5D7230-4 can be found in wfay's thread (Some people have reported success in bridging Linksys and Belkin routers)

Here's one post on how to successfully bridge a Linksys and Belkin router


By the way,here's what NetGear has to say

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-

rated:
How do I check my IP address?

How do get a refresh of the IP address without rebooting?

My IP address starts with 169. What does this mean? How do I get a real one?

You can check your IP address with the Winipcfg command (Windows 98) or the Ipconfig command (Windows NT, 2000, XP) as follows

IP numbers that begin with 192 and 169. Please post the whole set of digits. No one can do anything with the data

Winipcfg

Winipcfg is a network utility available in the Windows9X operating systems. You can use winipcfg to display IP configuration information (including IP address, Gateway, and DNS address.
To use winipcfg from within Windows:

1. Select the Start button on the Task Bar.
2. Select Run.
3. Type winipcfg.
4. The IP Configuration window will be displayed. This displays the IP address and Gateway information.
5. You may need to select the right network adapator in the drop down list
6. Select the More Info>> button to display more information. This displays the DNS server address.
7. Select OK to close the IP Configuration window.

To refresh the IP address without rebooting, press the release button. Then press the renew button

Ipconfig
To use ipconfig from within Windows:

1. Select the Start button on the Task Bar.
2. Select Run.
3. Type cmd.exe.
4. When the DOS command prompt window opens,Type ipconfig.
5. This will display basic IP configuration information. For more options, type ipconfig /?.

To refresh the IP address without rebooting, type ipconfig /release. Then type ipconfig /renew


I am getting an IP address that of the form 169.x.x.x and cannot connect to the internet

Your computer is not getting an IP address from the router (if you have one) or your broadband company (DSL /Cable). As your computer requires an IP address, it then "makes one up" and assigns one to itself.

Here's more information on the "169" problem

See the first post in this thread for troubleshooting tips

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My printer is not near my computer. How can I print?

The simplest answer is to use the printer sharing solution. There are two downsides. One is that the printer must be connect to a computer. The other is that it must be turned on. On the other hand, this is the most cost effective solution.

The other answer is to use a print server. The print server is additional hardware and software that takes the place of the computer controlling the printer directly.

Print servers can be built into the printer. Or they can be purchased aftewards. When they're built into the printer, the printers are generally advertised as "network ready"

If you buy a standalone print server, you should be aware of two things

1. Make sure you know whether you need to connect it to a USB or parallel port printer as some print servers do not support both
2. You should expect some of the enhanced capabilities of the printer - where the printer sends information to the PC (e.g. low ink warning message) will not work. As the print will send the message to the print server - which is not sophisticated enough to deal with it

And they can be wired or wireless ethernet. The most expensive, but most capable/flexible solution is to buy a printer with a built in wireless print server.


Example of a network ready printer (Wired)

Example of network ready wireless printer

Example of wireless print server

A final choice: Some printers support PANs (Personal Area Networks) via (wireless) Bluetooth. If your printer does, you can add a USB bluetooth adapator to print directly from your PC/laptop to the printer. No print server or 802.11 network requried

Note A USB /ethernet bridge will not make a USB Windows printer network capable. This is because a network printer alos requires a print server - software on the printer to store the print information until it prints. The USB/ethernet bridge provides connectivity but not a print server

rated:
Is wireless safe? What should I worry about?

With a strong password, WPA can be viewed as secure. WEP should only be viewed as enough to stop casual eavesdropping. If you use WEP you should expect that if someone wants your data, that they can get it.

WPA is, for all practical purposes, unbreakable. It, like other security does have an exposure - brute force dictionary attacks. i.e. just keep picking passwords and trying them.

To prevent this (1) Change your SSID to something that is not standard and (2) choose a strong password. Steve Gibson's password generator site is an ideal place to get a randon password https://www.grc.com/passwords Its one time generation, and is as close to random and strong as anything that can be generated. Because it relies on SSL encryption, the password it serves will be delivered securely to you, even over an otherwise insecure connection

And, because it prevents akami and other services from caching it, no one, even if you generated it over a public computer, can even see what you got once you close the web page, navigate to another site or refresh

If you use your wireless network at home, or at the office, and it is set up as discussed earlier (WPA security; router password; unique SSID ) then you can consider wireless safe enough for financial transactions.

However, when connecting to an unknown access point or a public hot spot, you should only consider information secure if you are using corporate VPN security which sets up a secure end-to-end tunnel

Absent VPN tunnels, from a public hot spot, or unknown access point, do not perform any financial transactions. Do not access anything that requires a password that you would not freely hand out on the street

Even secure websites (those with the little "key / locked" icon) are vulnerable to attacks. For example a Man-In-The-Middle attack coupled with an Evil Twin Access Point can compromise even otherwise secure websites

rated:
I have Xp Pro Sp2 on all my machines. How do I share a folder on the network but limit it to specific computers I specify?

You need to disable Simple File Sharing:
To disable Simple File Sharing in Windows XP Pro, click start, double-click My Computer, Tools, Folder Options, View tab, at the bottom of the list uncheck Use simple file sharing...

Then you need to set up a user Account on machine A that allows the user logon on B, with password (ideally matches the logon on B) and vice versa.

Finally you need to share the folders you wish on a user by user basis.

You should then be able to browse and find and access the folders

rated:
I took my laptop away for a few days, and when I came back Ihave internet connection but can't share files or printers

In all likelihood, one or both of the following holds true

1. You have software firewalls installed on your PCs and your router is handing out DHCP addresses. In this case, when you reconnect, the router hands out an IP address outside of the "trusted zone." The software firewall then blocks the connection

Solutions: Temporarily disable the software firewall to verify the problem /solution. Then either (a) expand the IP range of the software firewall to match the DHCP assignment range of the router, or restrict the DHCP range of the router to match the software firewall "safe" IP addresses. Reboot and you're good to go

2. You are using the Windows Wireless Zero Configuration Utility (WZC). This has many known problems

Solution: Download and install the latest version of the wireless configuration utility from your wireless NIC card supplier. Use that utility instead of WZC

rated:
Special issues with verizon dsl, Westell modems and Linksys routers

Verizon's latest Westell modems have a built in router that hands out IP addresses in the 192.168.1.x range. It also has built in PPPoE logon capability.

Together, these capabilities conflict with a standard Linksys router configuration for DSL, which also assigns IP addresses in the 192.168.1.x range. And also is normally configured for PPPoE.

Here's how to solve the problem
Alternative 1:
1. Connect the Linksys router to a PC via the LAN port.
2. Leave the WAN port vacant.
3.Reboot the PC and login into the Linksys router
4.Change the default IP address range to 192.168.2.1
5. Ensure the network type is set to DHCP (since the Westell modem is doing the PPPoE login)
6. Power everything down
7. Connect the Linksys router WAN to the DSL modem. Reboot everything and you're good to go

Alternative 2:
1. Connect the PC to the Westell modem and login to its management interface.
2. Configure the Westell modem through its management interface and put it into bridge mode
3. Power down everything.
4. Reconnect DSL modem--Linksys Router--Computers
5. Reboot
6 Configure Linksys router through its management interface with PPPoE, DSL logon and password


Alternative 3:

Verizon has finally figured out there is an issue and posted their own instructions

rated:
Compatability: Does the network device I buy have to be the same brand? What about my broadband modem?

a, b, g, n, pre-N: Which do I want?

All network devices that are built to standards are compatable - so when this is true you don't have to worry about brand. And the devices are often backward compatable.


For wired devices. 10/100/1000 baseT wired ethernet devices are compatable/ backward compatable, regardless of brand


For wireless devices
  • 802.11a devices are compatable, regardless of brand, and run at 54M
  • 802.11b devices are compatable, regardless of brand, and run at 10M
  • 802.11g devices are compatable, regardless of brand,and are backward compatable to all brands of 802.11b hardware, and run at 54M
  • 802.11 "super g" devices have not yet had their standards finalized and will only work at "super g" speeds (108M) with other "super g" devices of the same brand. However, regardless of brand, they are backward compatable to all brands of 802.11b/g hardware
  • 802.11 "pre-N" devices have not yet had their standards finalized and will only work at "pre-N" 54M speeds with other "pre-N" devices of the same brand. However, regardless of brand, they are backward compatable to all brands of 802.11b/g hardware

    Pre-N devices, due to the use of MIMO (Multiple Input/Mutliple Output Antennas) improve range. This has been benchmarked by a number of independent evaluation sites. This is true even with a pre-N router and legacy b and g devices.

    The "bridging" capability (See post about extending range) is not yet standards based and is only guaranteed to work within brand. However, people have reported success in getting Linksys and Belkin devices to successfully bridge with each other. Note that in bridge mode, many vendors only support WEP security, not WPA or WPA 2

    Note that when you mix brands, the vendor provided installation wizards are less functional. All vendors, however, support manual configuration

    The wired ports on any wireless devices are completely standards based and are compatable with any other wired ethernet device


    For Broadband modems

  • Cable modems are standards based, and any brand should work. However your cable company will need to know the MAC address of the cable modem in order for you to pass their security authentication and be allowed to connect

  • DSL modems, on the other hand, are not standards based (on the uplink port). Therefore, you must check with your provider if you want to change modems. (The downlink port that you connect to your own computer/network is ethernet 10base T standards based

rated:
Good Job

rated:
Thanks Ellory... very useful info

rated:
Nice work, ellory!

rated:
Now that's motivation. Good work!

rated:
Can get to sleep again, huh?

Why not put all this useful information up on a permanent "web site"?

Maybe you could call it "The FatWallet Computer Forum FAQ"?

rated:
This is a great resource OP.

If anyone is looking for specific information about the Belkin F5D7230-4 Wifi-G router, please check out my thread.

rated:
This is a very informative post, but doesn't explain how to do some things, like:

7. Configure PPPoE with logon/password for DSL or DHCP for cable modem
8. Enable IPSec Passthrough if you need to connect to a VPN at the office


I am trying to set up a network consisting of 3 computers. Here is what we have:

SBC Yahoo! DSL
Speedstream(?) Cable Modem
Netgear WGR614 Router
Computer 1 (Linkworld) is a custom-built PC with K7S5A Pro mobo (includes NIC), Athlon 2000+, etc.
Computer 2 (GQ) is a GQ computer from Fry's with NIC built in. There is also a Syntax USB adapter connected to it.
Computer 3 (eMachines) is an eMachines T1090. Also has a Siemens Speedstream USB network adapter. No NIC.

Linkworld, GQ, cable modem and Router are in the same room. Currently, I have the cable modem connected to the router and the router connected to the NICs in the first two computers. Both computers can get the DSL. In a perfect world though, GQ would be connected wirelessly to the router, rather than having to drag a cable across the floor. Also, eMachines should be connected wirelessly too (Currently, it is not connected to the DSL at all.)

And of course, security is very important. I don't want credit cards or passwords flying through the air on an unsecured connection.

Previously, I had tried (when we were on dial-up) setting up an Ad Hoc connection between the eMachines and an old CTX using two Speedstram adapters, but it was very hard to set up and I needed someone's help and once I got it going, it stopped, so I pretty much gave up.

So now that I have the DSL, I would like to first get it set up wirelessly to all of the computers (except Linkworld can be wired, since it is right next to the router) and eventually file and printer sharing. How EXACTLY do I go about doing this?

Thanks.

rated:
johnstexas said: This is a very informative post, but doesn't explain how to do some things, like:

7. Configure PPPoE with logon/password for DSL or DHCP for cable modem
8. Enable IPSec Passthrough if you need to connect to a VPN at the office
Thanks for the feedback. . Helps make the thread clearer for others. I edited the reference to add some more clarity on DSL vs Cable. However,the details of exactly how you setup IPSEC and the PPPoE logon are not provided as they are different in every model of every router. If your router supports IPSEC, its typically a dropdown or a selection. For PPPoE its typically a dropdown connection type choice. Then you enter your DSL logon and password.

As far as the rest of your question, I've reposted it, and my response in this thread in order to make your trouble easier to track and manage

rated:
Many Gracias! Ellory Da MAN!

rated:
Any solutions on how to connect WESTELL 327W and Dell 1450 WIFI ???

rated:
The Westell VersaLink 327W is known to have some problems, but it is a good DSL modem.

Now connecting to this modem should be very easy.

Open your browser and go to http://192.168.1.1/ <<---This is your DSL modem

The username and password should be the same as your DSL account.



In the page that opens, bring your cursor over "Connections" and a drop down
menu will appear, select "Wireless" It will request your login info.

- 1) "Wireless operation" set to enabled.
- 2) "Mode" set to "Mixed"
- 3) "4x Support" set to "Enabled"

       DO NOT fool around with the "Advanced Configuration" unless someone
       who knows what they are doing talks you through this.

- 4) "Authentication Type" set this to "Shared Key"
- 5) "WEP Security" set this to "Enabled"

- 6) "Key Select" set to "Key 1" then enter a 13 digit (128-bit) alpha numeric code.

       Now unless you are going to be needing more than one key, you only need to set
       the first one. So unless your 802.11 card supports higher, set
       this to 128-bit encryption and be sure to save the details to a text file in
       case you ever need to look it up again. You'll also need this key for setting
       up your connection on your system.

       Also be sure to include the "Network Name (SSID)" in the file, this will be needed.


- 7) "Hide SSID" set this to "Enabled"
- 8) "MAC Address Filtering" this is optional and can be left "Disabled"

Now hit the "Save" button and you are now ready to setup your wireless connection on your system.



Now use Start > Programs > Accessories > Communications > Wireless Network Setup Wizard

If you have any problems with your 1450 mini-PCI card, go to the DellTalk Forums
and do a search for 1450 and you should be able to find some threads which can point
you to better drivers located on the HP website for your card.



As to your VersaLink DSL modem, you'll find that any problems which occur with this
are caused by excessive heat buildup inside the modem housing. If you look at the way
the case is built, you'll notice that the cooling vents are very restrictive and not
very good for cooling. This is what causes the problems you'll read about in some other
forums.

To fix this, carefully open the case and remove the circuit board being careful not
to damage it and take note of how it goes back in. Now using either an X-acto knife
or a Dremel, you can open the cooling vents in the case by cutting out the obstructing
vents.

Once you finish, reassemble the modem and everything should work great after that
cause with the vents open, there won't be any heat buildup to cause any problems.

rated:
Thanks ellory.
Nice post.

rated:
Awesome post.

One question though: I am getting a new computer tomorrow. I just shared all my files, and they are all on my kids computer too. Now if I delete files from this computer, will they also be deleted from my kids computer? (like my pictures etc). If so, how can I avoid that?

rated:
If the files are shared, then there is only one version. Deleting the files will completely remove them.

If the files are a copy, then there are two versions.

If you have only shared them, then you can make a copy on the kids computer via standard windows drag and drop copy capbilities (on the kids computer open the shared files and make a copy. It would, of course, be good practice to also burn a copy to CD

rated:
ellory said: If the files are shared, then there is only one version. Deleting the diles will delete completely remove them.

If the files are a copy, then there are two versions.

If you have only shared them, then you can make a copy on the kids computer via standard windows drag and drop copy capbilities (on the kids computer open the shared files and make a copy. It would, of course, be good practice to also burn a copy to CD


Thank you! That is what I ended up doing. Anything I can with the iTunes list as well? Can that be shared?

rated:
Limited file sharing between Xp pro sp2 and Win98 SE ?

I have 2 computer and sharing internet connection with two other people through router.
One of my computer have XP pro sp2 and the other computer use Win 98 SE.

Is it possible to only share files between my two computer (Xp pro sp2 and Win98SE)?
Will turn off simple file sharing work with Win98se?

rated:
BokooI'm not sure entirely understand your question.

For clarity, could you read the first sticky and post back in a new thread with all the relevant information?

In the meantime, this may help

rated:
good post!

rated:
Hi,
I am using Verizon wireless. Recently, after install CounterSpy and Mcfee personal firewall, my laptop can still connect to the wireless network with exellent signal, but I cannot use internet anymore. What happens? Is it due to the firewall?


ellory said: I took my laptop away for a few days, and when I came back Ihave internet connection but can't share files or printers

In all likelihood, one or both of the following holds true

1. You have software firewalls installed on your PCs and your router is handing out DHCP addresses. In this case, when you reconnect, the router hands out an IP address outside of the "trusted zone." The software firewall then blocks the connection

Solutions: Temporarily disable the software firewall to verify the problem /solution. Then either (a) expand the IP range of the software firewall to match the DHCP assignment range of the router, or restrict the DHCP range of the router to match the software firewall "safe" IP addresses. Reboot and you're good to go

2. You are using the Windows Wireless Zero Configuration Utility (WZC). This has many known problems

Solution: Download and install the latest version of the wireless configuration utility from your wireless NIC card supplier. Use that utility instead of WZC

rated:
truongmymy said: Hi,
I am using Verizon wireless. Recently, after install CounterSpy and Mcfee personal firewall, my laptop can still connect to the wireless network with exellent signal, but I cannot use internet anymore. What happens? Is it due to the firewall?Since you lost wireless connectivity right after you installed these two products, then its quite likely this is the cause. You might try ensure that your firewall is properly configured. You might check your IP addresses. This thread may provide some insights on troubleshooting

rated:
ellory said: truongmymy said: Hi,
I am using Verizon wireless. Recently, after install CounterSpy and Mcfee personal firewall, my laptop can still connect to the wireless network with exellent signal, but I cannot use internet anymore. What happens? Is it due to the firewall?Since you lost wireless connectivity right after you installed these two products, then its quite likely this is the cause. You might try ensure that your firewall is properly configured. You might check your IP addresses. This thread may provide some insights on troubleshooting

You are great. My network runs well now. Thank you very much.

rated:
Well done ellory!

rated:
Have RCN residential cable in Boston area with several desktops hooked up through a Toshiba PCX DOCSIS (PCX2200) and some hubs along the way. Works fine.

Can I attach a wireless router to a hub running off the Toshiba and turn it on for the very rare occassion we'd be using a wireless connection to the laptop?

Would be essentially connecting a wireless router to a hub coming from a hard wired router. Do two routers make a conflict or is it OK?

BTW, great column on the networking.

rated:
This page says your cable modem supports up to 16 devices

This page implies that you are buying more than one IP address from RCN, and that this cable modem does not have DHCP capability Are you?

If you are, and you want to stay with this approach, then you'll need to either
1. buy another IP address from RCN and disable DHCP on the wireless router
2. leave DHCP enabled on the router and ensure that they it is not operating in the same IP range (i.e. matching first 3 numbers in IP address) as the addresses assigned by your cable company

Or, if you're buying muliple IP addresses, consider only buying one and connect the wireless router directly to the cable modem. And then connect everything to the wireless router (which can support up to 255 devices)

rated:
ELLORY: We have basic cable internet service with RCN and I beleive our multiple PC's on the same Toshiba router share everything.

If I understand correctly, I can connect the Netgear wireless router to a hub connected to the Toshiba hard wired cable modem, disable DHCP and all might be well?

Thanks.

rated:
Maybe. Can you report the results of an ipconfig? (see instructions on how to do this earlier in the thread)

rated:
Ellory: Followed instructions posted above and PM'd numbers to you.

rated:
IP numbers that begin with 192 and 169. There is no reason to PM rather than post. No one can do anything with the data.

That being said, you have a 192 IP range. It is being assigned locally by your cable modem, which must have an integrated router.

What you want to do will likely work if you disable DHCP on the wireless router

rated:
Thanks for your help, OP.

Works fine with default setup. Having never used a wireless system before it was a bit mindboggling with the unknown vocabulary.

Cheers.

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