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I was wondering if anyone could tell me what Outlook 2003 uses for the file names/extensions for emails, contacts, tasks, etc. AND if the default file locations can be changed to another directory?

I am trying to automate the back-up process at the organization I work for (approx. 10 personal computers). If I could figure out how to have these Outlook items save themselves into a paticular folder (like "My Documents" for example), then I could use Microsoft XP's Back Up feature to compress this data and save it to a networked drive.

So, does anyone here have knowledge of Outlook 2003, and can tell me what the program saves these files as, and their default location?

Thank you very much!

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jimmywalt said: [Q]I was wondering if anyone could tell me what Outlook 2003 uses for the file names/extensions for emails, contacts, tasks, etc. AND if the default file locations can be changed to another directory?

I am trying to automate the back-up process at the organization I work for (approx. 10 personal computers). If I could figure out how to have these Outlook items save themselves into a paticular folder (like "My Documents" for example), then I could use Microsoft XP's Back Up feature to compress this data and save it to a networked drive.

So, does anyone here have knowledge of Outlook 2003, and can tell me what the program saves these files as, and their default location?

Thank you very much!

You can save it where ever you want. Create a folder and go to setting and archive it. You can always click auto archive to creat rules for saving it. For additional details click Help> <AutoArchive> as key word.

I clicked on Outlook's Help, and searched on "backup" and found "Outlook File Locations"

Looks like:

Outlook data files (.pst)

Windows 98: drive:\\Windows\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows Me: drive:\\Windows\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows NT 4.0: drive:\\Winnt\\Profiles\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows 2000: drive:\\Documents and Settings\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook

Offline Folders file (.ost)

Windows 98: drive:\\Windows\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows Me: drive:\\Windows\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows NT 4.0: drive:\\Winnt\\Profiles\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows 2000: drive:\\Documents and Settings\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook

Personal Address Book (.pab)

Windows 98: drive:\\Windows\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows Me: drive:\\Windows\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows NT 4.0: drive:\\Winnt\\Profiles\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook
Windows 2000: drive:\\Documents and Settings\\<user>\\Local Settings\\Application Data\\Microsoft\\Outlook

Menu and view settings (.dat)
.
.
.
etc.


Does that help?

Just search for outlook.pst on your hard drive.

mike65535 said: [Q]I clicked on Outlook's Help, and searched on "backup" and found "Outlook File Locations"


Does that help?

Yes. I believe it will help me. I'm going to print out your information and try to find them.

Thanks.

I dont think you can import emails back from the mailboxes directly.
You can save them to a network drive , but to import them back directly isnt easy.

You will have to export the mailboxes and contacts as PST files and them import them.

in xp, they're in c:\\documents and settings\\<username>\\local settings\\application data\\outlook

local settings is a hidden folder, so you'll have to go to tools->folder options, view tab and select "show all files and folders" to view it if you can't see it.

you can import them in outlook using the file->open command.

With ten computers at your site, consider just putting a server in place. You can buy a low-end Dell server with Microsoft Small Business Server 2003 installed for less than $1000. Add a second inexpensive SATA drive and you now have a RAID1 array, which makes it nearly impossible to have data loss caused by a failed hard drive.

Now you have your own Exchange Server, complete with email, shared calendars, shared contacts, etc. And you can back up EVERYBODY'S email with just one backup (a backup of the Exchange Server email store). Not to mention you can automatically direct everybody's critical data files to the server also and back up those at the same time. That way you don't have to worry about how to back up ten computers. Just make backups of ONE computer (the server).

Did somewhat the same today, without spending a penny!

Used Microsoft Backup to create an automatic timed weekly backup of certain folders on each pc where all employees are instructed to save files.

These will be saved to one hard drive on the network, and then used a script to save this to an external hard drive. All backup files go in individual folders by person and are the folder names include the current date.

Once the external drive begins to get full, I will burn a selection of them to CD (like one set a month).

Totally free!





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