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There have been a few posts on these and related topics but nothing comprehensive. It seems to me that Linux is a great deal in terms of cost and its functionality is getting better everyday. It would be nice to have a compilation of important/useful information for those that are interested in making the switch.

Q: What is Linux?
A: See Linux on the wiki: link.

Q: How come there are so many Linux operating systems out there?
A: They are all Linux distributions that are based on a common core set of programs.

Q: What is a Linux distribution?
A: See Linux distribution on the wiki: link.

Q: What Linux distributions are out there?
A: See the list of Linux distributions on the wiki: link. A more comprehensive list is available on LWN. DistroWatch tries to track the more popular Linux distributions. See a short list in the quick summary.

Q: Which distribution is right for me?
A: Perhaps the best way to find out is to try some of them and decide for yourself. A comparison of Linux distributions is available on the wiki. The Linux Distribution Chooser can provide you with a good starting guess. In addition, you should try LiveCD for those distributions that provide one. A list of available LiveCDs can be found here. Also see this thread.

Q: Will it work on my PC/desktop/laptop/notebook?
A: If your hardware is mentioned on the Hardware Compatibility List, then it probably will.

Q: How can I get hold of a Linux distribution?
A: You can download ISO images and burn them to a CD/DVD, copy the CD/DVDs from a friend who already has them, buy CD/DVDs from retailers who sell them at a small cost (~$2/CD or DVD plus shipping) or buy a packaged retail distribution. If you are planning to download a Linux distribution, be aware that most distributions now have several CDs or a DVD which means that you will be downloading gigabytes of data. The nice way to do this is to use a BitTorrent client although many distributions will let you download directly from their website or a mirror. See the links in the quick summary.

Q: I now have CD/DVDs for a Linux distribution. Where can I get help installing it?
A: In this thread to start with. Also take a look at Linux For Newbies and Installing Linux. Some related threads: thread, thread, thread.

Q: Which filesystem should I use?
A: See the comparison of file systems on the wiki: link.

Q: What applications are available for Linux?
A: A large number of applications are available for various tasks. See these threads: thread, thread, thread, thread, thread. See details in the quick summary.

Q: Pointers to more resources?
A: See these links: thread, thread, thread

Q: Are there any other free operating systems?
A: Solaris is currently a free download from Sun. See this thread for details on how to get Solaris and development applications for Solaris. There are also several systems based on BSD Unix such as FreeBSD, NetBSD, etc. See details in the quick summary.

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
Gotta ask, trying to leanr UNIX/Linux for the first time. Thought about starting with more of a command line. Anybody kn... (more)

tedkilroy (Sep. 01, 2006 @ 4:33p) |

tedkilroy said: <blockquote><hr>Thought about starting with more of a command line.<br><hr></blockquote>What do you mean... (more)

noksagt (Sep. 01, 2006 @ 5:52p) |

legzakimbo said: <blockquote><hr>buyus said: <blockquote><hr><br><br>knoppix can not create nor format the partition. it... (more)

buyus (Sep. 18, 2006 @ 9:12a) |

Popular Linux Distributions
SUSE Linux: website, download evaluation version.
Mandriva Linux: website, download basic/free edition,
Xandros: website, download basic/free edition. FAR for a limited time; see post, post, post and post. Also see this post.
Linspire: website, no free download but you can try this.
Freespire: website, download, FW Thread.
LINARE: website, no free download.
Debian: website, download.
Ubuntu: website, download, get a free CD.
Gentoo: website, download.
Slackware: website, download.
Fedora: website, download.
Kubuntu (Ubuntu+KDE): website, download.
MEPIS: website, download.
KNOPPIX: website, download LiveCD.
Cygwin (Linux like environment for Windows): website, download Cygwin installer.
See below for a list of books. Virtually every book on a specific distribution includes a CD or DVD of that distribution. The books on SUSE, for instance, include a copy of the full version of SUSE 10 (32 bit only).

BSD Style Free Operating Systems
FreeBSD: website, download.
NetBSD: website, download.
DragonFly BSD: website, download.
OpenBSD: website, download.
OpenDarwin: website, download.
PCBSD: website,download here or here. Easy to install applications

Solaris and OpenSolaris
OpenSolaris: website, no binary downloads yet.
Solaris Express: download.
Solaris: website, download.

Applications for Linux
Below you will find a list of applications that are available natively for Linux. Many more can be used with wine/CrossOver/Cedaga.

Internet Applications for Linux
Browsing, Email and RSS: Firefox+Thunderbird (included in most distros, see thread, thread); Opera for Linux (another superb browser, see this thread).
Instant Messaging and IRC: GAIM, Kopete (included in most distros).
Yahoo Messenger for Unix: doesn't seem to be under active development.
Internet Telephony: Skype for Linux (free download).
BitTorrent: Azureus (free download).
eDonkey and Kad networks: xMule, aMule (free download).
Gnutella: Qtella (free download), others.
Gnutella 2 (see clients at the bottom of linked page).

Antivirus Software for Linux
Linux does not have viruses!

Office Applications for Linux
StarOffice: Modest cost, can import Microsoft Office documents and can export to PDF. Free download for academic users.
OpenOffice.org: Free download, can import simple Microsoft Office documents. See thread and thread.
Adobe Reader: for viewing PDF documents.
KOffice: another free office applications suite.

Finance Applications for Linux
GnuCash: open source accounting application.

Science and Engineering Applications for Linux
Matlab for Linux.
Mathematica for Linux.
Octave.
LaTeX: document preparation and typesetting system, included with many distros.
Ghostscript, Ghostview and GSview: postscript and PDF viewers.
Scientific Applications on Linux

Multimedia Players for Linux
VLC: a very competent player.
MPlayer: another excellent player.
xine: yet another good player.
RealPlayer for Linux
Ogle: DVD player for Linux.
XdTV: for watching TV under Linux.

Games for Linux
See the list of games for Linux at Amazon.com here. Also see the Linux Gamers' Games List and the Linux Gamers' FAQ.

Multimedia Editing for Linux
Audacity: free audio editor and recorder.
FFmpeg: audio/video conversion tool.

System Utilities for Linux
TightVNC: VNC based remote desktop tool.
Linux NTFS Project: library to access NTFS (Windows) file systems from Linux.

Other Applications for Linux
Sun Java Desktop System: bundle of previously mentioned applications and more; not being actively developed for Linux.

CD/DVD Burning Applications for Linux
K3b
NeroLINUX: Nero for Linux!

For Running Windows Applications on Linux
Wine: will run simpler and legacy Windows applications.
Win4Lin: proprietary emulator for running Windows applications.
CodeWeavers: for running Microsoft Office and similar applications under Linux.
TransGaming: products for running Windows based games under Linux!
VMware: also see this thread.

Server Applications for Linux
MySQL: database.
Apache: HTTP server and more.

Development Tools for Linux
Intel Software Development Products for Linux
GCC: standard compiler for Linux, included in most distros.
NetBeans: IDE for development.
Sun Studio: IDE for Solaris that also supports Linux; see thread.
Eclipse
Sun Development Tools: more Sun software that also supports Linux.

Places to Buy Retail Packaged Linux
Amazon.com
Buy.com
NewEgg.com

Linux and Wireless
Linux Wireless LAN Howto
NdisWrapper: for using proprietary Windows drivers under Linux.

Links to More Info
  • More Applications
  • 25 Reasons to Convert to Linux
  • Which is the best linux operating system?
    It is a good idea to try several of these before you settle down with one. One way to do that is to get the book Linux Bible 2006 Edition: Boot Up to Fedora, KNOPPIX, Debian, SUSE, Ubuntu and 7 Other Distributions.
  • Media player on linux
  • File sharing: Linux --> WinXP
  • Dual Booting with an External Hard Drive
  • Recommended Linux Books for Beginners

    Advantages of Linux?
  • Lower Cost: Virtually every Linux distribution retails for less than a retail package of Windows, while its functionality is rapidly approaching that of Windows (or even exceeding it in some areas). If you already got a free copy of Windows when you bought your computer, read the other benefits. If you have an older copy of Windows, you might want to switch to Linux instead of upgrading and save money.
  • Its more than an operating system. It is an operating system plus applications suite. You get applications for all the basic tasks straight out of the box and you can download many others. For many ordinary (and some not so ordinary) tasks, that is all you need. So why pay for each application and its unused features.
  • No Malware: You do not have to worry about viruses or spyware or other malicious programs. Unless you are working from a root account (not a good idea for everyday use), you don't risk de-stabilising the system or ending up with malicious programs.
  • Use 64 bit Computing: The major distributions of Linux are available for 64 bit processors today and run just fine on these platforms. You can use the advanced power of your system today without having to wait for Windows XP x64 compatible applications.
  • Share It: If you like it, you can tell your friends about it and even lend them your CD/DVD so that they can try it for themselves.

    Disadvantages of Linux
  • Hardware support is still not as strong as Windows. In particular, problems arise with wireless cards, printers and scanners.
  • No simple way to play (Windows) games. You can use Cedaga but it is a monthly subscription service.
  • DVD playback is not fully supported under Linux. You need to download and install a patch whose legality can be questioned.

    Books and Resources to Help You Get Started
  • SUSE Linux 10 Unleashed
  • SUSE Linux 10 Bible
  • Any books on Mandriva 2006?
  • A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming
  • Debian GNU/Linux 3.1 Bible
  • The Debian System: Concepts and Techniques
  • Linux Made Easy: The Official Guide to Xandros 3 for Everyday Users
  • Linspire 5: The No Nonsense Guide!
  • Peter van der Linden's Guide to Linux
  • Beginning Ubuntu Linux: From Novice to Professional
  • Moving to Ubuntu Linux
  • Red Hat Fedora 4 Unleashed
  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux and Fedora Core 4
  • Slackware Linux Essentials
  • Hacking Knoppix
  • Knoppix Hacks: 100 Industrial Strength Tips and Tools
  • Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

    Good compilation OP.


    maybe this should also be a random tips thread too, otherwise I fear it will just fall off the main page.

    Gentoo installation tip:

    Boot knoppix, not the Gentoo disk, and then do the installation from there. You will need a working ethernet connection though.

    Benefits:
    You get a nice X Windows environment to work in (i.e. firefox, openoffice, gaim etc)
    You get the latest version of portage (since you need to download the stage-3 and portage files from an ftp server)
    Knoppix has auto-detected most of your hardware and an "lsmod" will show the drivers required

    Costs:
    It's a little slower (knoppix will be using some of your resources to run)

    You would pick up the gentoo manual at around Chapter 4... It assumes you've partitioned your disk and created file-systems... you start and the part where you untar the stage-3 file and just before chrooting

    Well every thing is fine.
    But is there a simple way to install a software?. (like in Windows Double click exe/zip file and you are done)
    how to install drivers?
    How to mount and unmount devices?
    how to setup network (wired/wireless)
    I always end up with problem.

    I get a lot of rpm or tar.gz etc.
    I do not know how to compile/install. if you can provide a link for that, then that will b great.
    Thanks for the help.

    legzakimbo said: [Q]maybe this should also be a random tips thread too, otherwise I fear it will just fall off the main page.

    Gentoo installation tip:

    Boot knoppix, not the Gentoo disk, and then do the installation from there. You will need a working ethernet connection though.

    Benefits:
    You get a nice X Windows environment to work in (i.e. firefox, openoffice, gaim etc)
    You get the latest version of portage (since you need to download the stage-3 and portage files from an ftp server)
    Knoppix has auto-detected most of your hardware and an "lsmod" will show the drivers required

    Costs:
    It's a little slower (knoppix will be using some of your resources to run)

    You would pick up the gentoo manual at around Chapter 4... It assumes you've partitioned your disk and created file-systems... you start and the part where you untar the stage-3 file and just before chrooting

    Random tips are welcome too. I am aware that many people will have some difficulty in installing/using Linux. While this thread cannot be a definitive resource for troubleshooting, there are some common problems for which there is a small and simple solution. I would like to see them here.

    buyus said: [Q]
    But is there a simple way to install a software?.

    depends on the package type. For gentoo (ebuilds) it's:
    # emerge -uDav <package name>


    [Q]how to install drivers?

    If they're not built in to the kernel, you build them according to the developers directions and then:
    # modprobe <driver name>

    [Q]How to mount and unmount devices?

    mount /dev/hdXY /mount/point
    umount /dev/hdXY

    [Q]how to setup network (wired/wireless)

    This is a little more in depth. I use a program called quickswitch. I set up the config file however I want it and then run:
    # switchto home-wireless
    to move from wired ethernet to wireless

    I've set it to boot to home-wired by default by a flag in my grub.conf


    [Q]I do not know how to compile/install

    Typically, it's:

    $ bunzip -c <file.tar.bz2> | tar xvf -
    $ cd <appname>
    $ ./configure && make
    # make install

    but there is nearly always a readme file included.

    If you have any more specific questions feel free to ask

    I am looking for good software for doing backups under Linux. I have an external hard drive for this purpose. Can anyone give me any references?

    I've been wanting to install a good distro for a long time but came up with compatibility problems. More than install help, anyone know of Linux tech support at a reasonable charge? If there were a LUG in my area, I'd like to find someone who could walk me through it step-by-step. I'm in the Tampa, FL area.

    Nice OP!

    can someone tell me WHY it might be a good idea to use or at least try out Linu? I've seen mention of it in various places.....thanks

    tiger0721 said: [Q]can someone tell me WHY it might be a good idea to use or at least try out Linu? I've seen mention of it in various places.....thanks

    it's good if:
    1) you don't like virii
    2) you don't want to re-install every 6 months
    3) you don't want spyware
    4) you like free stuff
    5) you want full control
    6) you don't want to reboot every time an application is patched
    7) performance is just as good after 6 months of running as it is one minute after booting

    it's not good if:
    1) you game
    2) you expect everything to just work immediately (not to say it's broken, but some apps make you copy a config file to the appropriate location first)
    3) you don't want to touch the command line

    What have you got to lose by trying it?

    jitinarora said: [Q]I am looking for good software for doing backups under Linux. I have an external hard drive for this purpose. Can anyone give me any references?

    Depends on what you are looking to backup.

    easy home directory backup could be something like this.

    cd /home/jitinarora

    tar -cvf - * 2>>/tmp/error.file | compress > /mnt/external_drive/backup.tar.Z

    tiger0721 said: [Q]can someone tell me WHY it might be a good idea to use or at least try out Linu? I've seen mention of it in various places.....thanks
    It's called LINUX. Have some respect for this OS, it's a better alternative than Windows. I edited my comments, but believe the average Linux user has more brain power than the average Windows user. Exactly why the hackers choose to attack your OS.

    Bill Gates created Windows. Linus Torvalds created Linux. Get schooled & come back when you're ready for a real man's operating system.

    SeriusBlack said: [Q]tiger0721 said: [Q]can someone tell me WHY it might be a good idea to use or at least try out Linu? I've seen mention of it in various places.....thanks
    excuse me, it's called LINUX. Why is it the average Windows user can't even be bothered with spellcheck?
    teh Intenret is a grate place. yes it iz.

    Bill Gates created Windows. Linus Torvalds created Linux. Get schooled & come back when you're ready for a real man's operating system.

    Hey SeriousBlack, easy on the noob.

    To find your local LUG, google is the best option. Try something like this. Also, many companies provide tech support for Linux, including the major vendors. One way to get support is to buy a support subscription from the company from which you bought a distribution. For instance, if you opted for Linspire, then you can buy a support package from them. Such support packages typically also include free access to additional apps, updates and upgrades for a specified period of time. You may also get other features such as discounts on other commercial softwares.

    buyus said: [Q]Well every thing is fine.
    But is there a simple way to install a software?. (like in Windows Double click exe/zip file and you are done)
    how to install drivers?
    How to mount and unmount devices?
    how to setup network (wired/wireless)
    I always end up with problem.

    I get a lot of rpm or tar.gz etc.
    I do not know how to compile/install. if you can provide a link for that, then that will b great.
    Thanks for the help.

    Yes, many distributions now include some program that provides functionality similar to that of the Windows Control Center. I can vouch for SUSE which has the excellent YasT2. You don't even have to download the app; you just search using a keyword and check a box against the desired software. It will automatically download and install it for you. Uninstall and hardware configuration are equally easier with YasT2. The same applies for installing drivers (they are considered to be another software package), for mounting and unmounting drives (also do-able from the command line), and setting up network. For wireless cards, if your card is not supported, you may need to use ndiswrapper and google search to get you started.

    I suggest that you get the book SUSE Linux 10 Unleashed from Amazon/eBay. It is a good and gentle introduction for the beginner and also includes a DVD with the full 32 bit version of SUSE Linux 10. Great for getting started.

    SeriusBlack said: [Q]Bill Gates created Windows. Linus Torvalds created Linux. Get schooled & come back when you're ready for a real man's operating system.

    <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border=0>

    SeriusBlack said: [Q]Bill Gates created Windows. Linus Torvalds created Linux. Get schooled & come back when you're ready for a real man's operating system.

    Now that's what I'm talkin' 'bout! Dang time that BSD and OS X got some respect! <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-cool.gif" border=0>

    So where can I get this free OS X thingy? It is free right, as your post could not possibly be a cheap attempt to hijack/pollute this thread, correct? <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-wink.gif" border=0>

    I like how you mention in the quick notes thing there no virses, maybe you should also mention instead of virsues you get rooted and then your screwed.


    davef139 said: [Q]I like how you mention in the quick notes thing there no virses, maybe you should also mention instead of virsues you get rooted and then your screwed.

    what ports are you leaving open in order to get rooted?

    legzakimbo said: [Q]davef139 said: [Q]I like how you mention in the quick notes thing there no virses, maybe you should also mention instead of virsues you get rooted and then your screwed.

    what ports are you leaving open in order to get rooted?

    Personally I haven't was just pointing out.

    davef139 said: [Q][Q]what ports are you leaving open in order to get rooted?Personally I haven't was just pointing out.Just pointing out that you don't know what you're talking about? Your statement is FUD. Any well-maintained mainstream OS is fairly secure on the net. ANY unpatched/unfirewalled OS can be rooted (and unpatched Windows boxes have been shown to be compromised quicker than unpatched *nix boxes).

    Windows does have a higher population of viruses. But you are somewhat correct to criticize the Quick Summary: It would be wise for *nix boxes which share a lot of content with windows users to run antiviral software (such as ClamAV), to prevent propoagating viruses to windows boxes.

    Also know what services you are running, what ports are open, update your distribution regularly.

    Big early one was with the sendmail and finger exploits by RTM. Pretty much killed "internet" years ago.

    Yes that was with UNIX boxes.

    backsplatter said: [Q]
    Big early one was with the sendmail and finger exploits by RTM. Pretty much killed "internet" years ago.

    Yes that was with UNIX boxes.


    RTM must be 40 years old now <img src="i/expressions/face-icon-small-smile.gif" border=0>... how many other true *nix virii have there been? Not holes but propagating virii?

    hehe..good point.

    Most that you would find recently would be going after web server (apache, PHP, ... ) something like that.

    If you aren't running a public accesable server and are behind a firewall you don't have much to worry about at all.

    There was the SSH problem with a possible exploit a few years ago. I know if I'm wanting access I would leave SSH open. Possible VNC although you could do tunneling or something.

    backsplatter said: [Q]Big early one was with the sendmail and finger exploits by RTM. Pretty much killed "internet" years ago.I actually thought of mentioning the Morris worm, but it was launched in 1988. So, yes: Unix (and we're talking Unix--not modern *nix systems) was exploited more severely than windows....before windows had a network stack! (Does anyone still remember Windows/286?) Not 40 years old, but it might as well have been.[Q]Most that you would find recently would be going after web server (apache, PHP, ... ) something like that.WAMP stacks are no mo secure than LAMP stacks & IIS suffers similar attacks. This thread seems to be pushing Linux as a desktop system. Don't run an *AMP stack if you don't need one![Q]There was the SSH problem with a possible exploit a few years ago.Again, this effected most implementations of SSH (including those on windows).[Q]Possible VNC although you could do tunneling or something.Or just run a VPN (OpenVPN is quite good on either *nix or windows). The guideline of not running what you don't use and don't need is universal.



    Any and all operating systems have been known to have vulnerabilities. Whether linux has less of them than windows is still not a settled issue. From what I have observed, security patches have become a common feature of all OSes and most of them (including all the major linux distros) provide an application that checks for, downloads and installs updates and patches. (SUSE has YOU, Xandros has Xandros Networks, ...). In fact, I believe that the idea of automated system updates in linux was borrowed from windows.

    Any computer that doesn't have all the security updates installed is at risk irrespective of the operating system. I don't doubt that it is possible to create viruses, trojans, spywares, etc for linux. They just don't propogate because most linux users don't work as root and hence the system itself remains unaffected. The downside of this is that ease of use is affected. (Every time you want to install a program, you need to use su and/or provide root password.) Also, there are fewer attempts to create such malware because there are fewer computers running linux.

    In the area of security, I think the advantage that linux has is that it has a better viewpoint. With linux, security is a core issuse, as important as useability or functionality. With windows, it is an afterthought. As such, most linux users are more aware and vigilant than windows users.

    Finally, I have also noticed that I tend to download/install fewer programs under linux than I do under windows. This probably has to do with the fact that most linux distributions include a large number of application packages which can be installed along with the OS. With less downloading and installing, I am at less risk of malware.

    Since I am a vigilant user, I have not been hit by any malware during my last couple of years of windows use. My reasons for going with linux are price and performance. Unlike windows, I don't have to submit to stupid checks (product activation, genuine advantage validation, and who knows whats next) to use my linux software. Less time spent in searching for and downloading applications from the internet is more time spent on doing productive work. And if I ever copy large files to/from windows, it is time for a coffee break; not so with linux. Finally, I do buy linux software when the need arises and it is usually cheaper than windows software (StarOffice vs Microsoft Office for instance).

    jitinarora said: [Q]In fact, I believe that the idea of automated system updates in linux was borrowed from windows.Windows update was released with Win 98. Debian's apt was introduced around the same time. Hard to say what came first. Update handling was in third-party applications before the OS. Windows still doesn't have a central update mechanism for all apps (MS update does Office + Windows, but not third party apps). Most Linux distros will also have updates for non-core OS software that is in package repositories.[Q]Finally, I do buy linux software when the need arises and it is usually cheaper than windows software (StarOffice vs Microsoft Office for instance).Star Office for Linux costs the same as Star Office for Windows. The same is true for most dual-platform apps.

    noksagt said: [Q]jitinarora said: [Q]In fact, I believe that the idea of automated system updates in linux was borrowed from windows.Windows update was released with Win 98. Debian's apt was introduced around the same time. Hard to say what came first. Update handling was in third-party applications before the OS. Windows still doesn't have a central update mechanism for all apps (MS update does Office + Windows, but not third party apps). Most Linux distros will also have updates for non-core OS software that is in package repositories.[Q]Finally, I do buy linux software when the need arises and it is usually cheaper than windows software (StarOffice vs Microsoft Office for instance).Star Office for Linux costs the same as Star Office for Windows. The same is true for most dual-platform apps.

    Thanks for correcting me on the second point. Yes, dual platform apps do cost the same on both the platforms. I was implicitly comparing MS Windows + Office with Linux + StarOffice. These are most common configurations but since StarOffice is available for Windows also, it is possible to replace just MS Office. That of course means that the cost of commercial applications is not an issue. The other points about why I chose Linux still stand.

    I do not have details about the early phases of update mechanisms but I believe Windows had a lead here. Of course, that is not to imply that windows is still ahead or that windows does it better. I agree that with linux, updates on all packages that are included in the package repository are passed on to you, and this certainly makes life easier.

    Star Office for Linux costs the same as Star Office for Windows. The same is true for most dual-platform apps.

    Not true. Many dual platform apps charge for the Windows version but not the linux version. Additionally, MANY applications in Mac and Linux are just part of the OS while Windows does not have a similar function. A good example would be the ability to take notes and reference them quickly. both OS X and Linux distros have built-in tools


    giz

    giz said: [Q]Not true. Many dual platform apps charge for the Windows version but not the linux version.I can think of a few non-desktop apps that do this for non-commercial entities (such as Intel's compilers). But they seem few and far between. Matlab, Mathematica, Matlab, StarOffice, Oracle, WordPerfect (when they had a Linux app), VMWare, Mulberry (when they were still in business), S-Plus, SAS, etc. all charge similar fees. I can't think of any commercial app which allows commercial use which is free on Linux and not on windows.[Q]Additionally, MANY applications in Mac and Linux are just part of the OS while Windows does not have a similar function.I can't frankly think of any. Most linux distros have large software repositories, yes. That doesn't mean the software is exclusively for Linux.[Q]A good example would be the ability to take notes and reference them quickly. both OS X and Linux distros have built-in toolsWTF does this mean? I can open vim just as quickly on any OS.

    I use desktop linux. My two PCs use it solely. My laptop dual boots it. My server is FreeBSD. I see no reason to stretch the truth to motivat other people to switch, though.

    Great post, OP!

    My bad--I cross-posted.
    Here's where I posted my unrelated question

    Please don't cross-post. Either ask an admin to lock your new thread or direct people to that thread to answer your question.

    jitinarora said: [Q]They just don't propogate because most linux users don't work as root and hence the system itself remains unaffected. The downside of this is that ease of use is affected. (Every time you want to install a program, you need to use su and/or provide root password.)

    Do you really feel like your ease of use is affected? The fundamental difference for me is that switching users in windows (from 'user' to 'admin') has always seemed like a real pain. In linux it's just a matter of su(do)... maybe it's just cos I'm so used to it that I barely notice anymore.

    legzakimbo said: [Q]The fundamental difference for me is that switching users in windows (from 'user' to 'admin') has always seemed like a real pain. In linux it's just a matter of su(do)...Windows does offer "Run as" and fast user switching and the third party SUperior SU. Running win32 as LUA is still a pain in the butt, though.

    legzakimbo said: [Q]jitinarora said: [Q]They just don't propogate because most linux users don't work as root and hence the system itself remains unaffected. The downside of this is that ease of use is affected. (Every time you want to install a program, you need to use su and/or provide root password.)

    Do you really feel like your ease of use is affected? The fundamental difference for me is that switching users in windows (from 'user' to 'admin') has always seemed like a real pain. In linux it's just a matter of su(do)... maybe it's just cos I'm so used to it that I barely notice anymore.

    I suppose I said that because these days I am installing a lot of stuff, so I keep doing su, ./configure, make, make install. It would probably be a non-issue once I have my system set up correctly.

    badmofaux said: [Q]Great post, OP!

    My bad--I cross-posted.
    Here's where I posted my unrelated question

    Since this is a general linux thread, I think it would be a good idea if you make your thread a samba config thread. Post some tips in your thread and I will include a link to it in the quick summary here. In fact, setting up samba is one of the next steps that I need to do on my SUSE installation so it would help if I can some tips to get up to speed quickly.

    Anyone tried PCBSD ? Its from the BSD family. The installation process is very simple. Also, adding applications is very simple as well. You just download and double-click prepackaged .pbi files (think Windows' .exe) files and its done and ready. You can get these .exe's, I mean .pbi's at pbiDIR. According to the developers, each application is independent of each other, thus no "dependency hell". I'm trying out Xandros 3 now, and installing .deb and .rpm files is a hit and miss affair, compared to installing .pbi files for PCBSD. You should also be able to use FreeBSD's ports to get more applications (I haven't done this yet though). I also find the forum regulars friendly and helpful and not the typical "M$ is evil" bunch of folks.

    Ubuntu 6.06 Beta (Dapper Drake) released.

    "Desktop CD" (.ISO Link) can be used as a Live CD and also as an installation CD.

    I like the idea of Desktop CD.

    Skipping 12 Messages...
    legzakimbo said: [Q]buyus said: [Q]

    knoppix can not create nor format the partition. it even can not see any partitions.


    Is this a setup from an active knoppix boot CD? If so, umount the disk partitions first

    # cd
    # umount -a

    There was a small error. It was knopmyth and not knoppix. It is not live CD.


    "the disk is read only. You can not write to the drive"

    this is the messgage I got.

    Actully now I wanted to install that on a vista RC1 machine.
    Not the XP2 as I used earlier.
    I will try other distro to see it is the same problem or not.



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