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This thread originally started as a project to configure a Linux PC for public use. I have now updated the QucikSummary to reflect the tools and configuration I used

You can also read the thread to follow how I got there and the choices / tradeoffs I made

====Original Post follows =========================


I am installing Ubuntu on a public use / shared PC and would like to enforce session length. e.g. have Ubuntu log the user off after 60 minutes to allow other patrons to have access.

Preferrably with a display / countdown timer

Does anyone know how to do this? My google searches lead me to discussions of menu timeouts, not use / session logoffs

I would also like to prevent users from saving any files / making any changes, except on USB devices

These capabilities are what the Windows environment has in Microsoft Steady State

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
I am assuming that the first PC is working well then?

enterkey (Feb. 17, 2010 @ 10:59p) |

First PC is working well. No one has had any issues, although I have over heard some people comment that windows looks ... (more)

ellory (Feb. 18, 2010 @ 3:04a) |

Well, no second Ubuntu machine for me. The Ubuntu install hung while starting the install and displayer a corrupt video... (more)

ellory (Feb. 18, 2010 @ 11:38a) |

What I currently have

Created a custom script and made it executable
1, Open the terminal window
2, Go to /usr/local/bin by typing "cd /usr/local/bin"
3, Type in "sudo nano auto-logout"
4, Type in your admin password when asked.
5, Type in/copy over the script into nano (make sure that the first line stop at the very top)
6, Ctrl-x, then Y to save, another ENTER to tell it to save with the currently displayed file name
7, Type in "sudo chmod 755 auto-logout" to make the script executable.

The objective of the script is to delete saved downloads or docs from patron and to reboot the computer after 60 minutes

#!/bin/bash
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 1 hour"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 55 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 50 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 45 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 40 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 35 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 30 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 25 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 20 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 15 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 10 minutes"
/bin/sleep 5m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 5 minutes"
/bin/sleep 1m
notify-send "This computer will reboot in 1 minute"

cd /home/patron/Documents
/bin/rm * -rf
cd /home/patron/Downloads
/bin/rm * -rf
/usr/bin/python -u /usr/lib/gnomenu/session-manager.py reboot



Other things I've done
1. Installed Firefox and configured to start in Private Browsing Mode by default
2. Installed the Public Fox AddOn to prevent Firefox changes
3. Edited Options in OpenOffice to save in Office format by default
4. Set Ubuntu to Boot into Patron by Default
5. Set Ubuntu to Run the above script at logon
6. Installed and configured Sabayon to prevent many user changes. Along with Lockdown Editor (sudo pessulus from terminal). Also ran Sabayon from terminal
7. Used Main Menu to hide (but not disable) unwanted application controls. Hide main menu and you access it via alacarte from terminal. Hide terminal and you can access it via ALT-F2 gnome-terminal
8. Installed gnomenu to reboot the computer
9. Changed permissions on desktop to be read only
10. Installed Java
11. After the Desktop was the way I wanted it (links to Documents and Downloads), locked it down with sudo chown root:root /home/patron/Desktop
12. Used gconf-editor to lock the panel and the wallpaper. User can change it but it is reset the next reboot
13. Installed lib-notify program


Needs
1. Need to empty trash on exit
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I can only answer part of question for now.

You could make a script with this content and call it when the session starts (add in System->Preference->Session or Startup Applications).


#!/bin/bash
sleep 60m
gnome-session-save --logout


This would log user off in 60 minutes. Unfortunately, this won't provide the countdown clock or warnings.

As for preventing the file writing, maybe you could try making the /home directory completely read only? I am not sure if it would interfere with browsing because Firefox wouldn't be able to write any cookie.

There is also a guest session feature, which would almost do what you want, but I can't find a way to prevent user from exiting the guest session.

Before sleep, run Countdown timer.

Thanks for the input. I am a Ubuntu newbie - so I can install it and use, but I still find it difficult or impossible to install software and scripts

The guest session looks interesting. Is there a way to log directly into it on boot? It seems the only way to get to it is once you are already in a session with another account

You may have already done this, but it'd be a good idea to make a separate under privileged account for guest users to use than admin account you use to configure.

Timer applet wouldn't work since someone has to set the time up each time it loads, so it seems. If you want to try it, it's available inside Synaptic, so it's easy enough to install (search for timer-applet).

As for custom scripts, assuming that you'd be placing the script in /usr/local/bin (it can be anywhere in reality):
1, Open the terminal window
2, Go to /usr/local/bin by typing "cd /usr/local/bin"
3, Type in "sudo nano auto-logout"
4, Type in your admin password when asked.
5, Type in/copy over the script into nano (make sure that the first line stop at the very top)
6, Ctrl-x, then Y to save, another ENTER to tell it to save with the currently displayed file name
7, Type in "sudo chmod 755 auto-logout" to make the script executable.

Then you can add this to session/startup application for the under-privileged account. It should start every single time.

As for starting into guest session, I couldn't find a way to do that, but I did fine a way to auto-start it upon logging into an account. Just run "/usr/share/gdm/guest-session/guest-session-launch" at the start up of the guest account. Unfortunately, there isn't a way to prevent the user from logging out of the guest session into the regular account.

Here's what I've done so far
1. Created a "patron" account
2. Set Firefox to default to start in private mode
3. Set Autologon to patron account
4. Set OpenOffice defaults to save in MS Office formats (bug in powerpoint save)

This way when the system boots it loads into the patron account automatically

Here's what I still need to do
1. Find a way to restrict any changes to the patron account. I don't want people to change the desktop layout, change screen saver time or password, etc.
2. Find a way to automatically delete any saved documents or downloaded files
s
These would be nice to haves
1. Auto logout after specified period of time. I have to read and understand what enterkey wrote
Question: Is this an autologout or autorestart script? As the autologon only works with a restart, I need the latter
2. Put an icon for the Documents and Download Directories on the desktop
1. The autologout timer. I have to read and understand

ellory said: Here's what I've done so far
1. Created a "patron" account
2. Set Firefox to default to start in private mode
3. Set Autologon to patron account
4. Set OpenOffice defaults to save in MS Office formats (bug in powerpoint save)

This way when the system boots it loads into the patron account automatically


Those sound good.


Here's what I still need to do
1. Find a way to restrict any changes to the patron account. I don't want people to change the desktop layout, change screen saver time or password, etc.
2. Find a way to automatically delete any saved documents or downloaded files


For a guest account, the only writable location is under /home/patron (if the user name is patron). You don't need to worry about anywhere else.

I am just throwing some ideas out, but maybe you want to save the good configuration, then load them up at log out, maybe using "rsync"?


These would be nice to haves
1. Auto logout after specified period of time. I have to read and understand what enterkey wrote
Question: Is this an autologout or autorestart script? As the autologon only works with a restart, I need the latter


That script logs off the user after 60 minutes without any prompt back to login screen. Users would need the password to patron account to log back on.

Ubuntu requires root access to shutdown or reboot through command line. This is so no guest user can do that remotely.

That said, I think there are ways around that, though the steps would be a little more involved.


2. Put an icon for the Documents and Download Directories on the desktop


This would be solved by syncing back as I suggested above (using "rsync").


1. The autologout timer. I have to read and understand

The timer that was suggested is very generic timer, so I don't know if it would work for this purpose.

Thanks enterkey, I know I am going slowly here and I appreciate the help. I did find this Ubuntu lockdown manager. I have installed it, but I am configuration challenged as

1. I don't understand all the options
2. I don't see the locks that they refer to, perhaps because I am configuring this in an already limited account
3. I don't understand how a user can't just undo the lockdown because I am working / configuring within that account

Edit: I found the gshutdown program but it seems like the user can turn it off. Working on the command line options. Perhaps I could combine it with the previous script. Also, I added in rm -rf commands in the script to delete files in Documents and Downloads. I wonder if I can empty the trash

ellory said: Thanks enterkey, I know I am going slowly here and I appreciate the help. I did find this Ubuntu lockdown manager. I have installed it, but I am configuration challenged as

1. I don't understand all the options
2. I don't see the locks that they refer to, perhaps because I am configuring this in an already limited account
3. I don't understand how a user can't just undo the lockdown because I am working / configuring within that account


Ah this might work for you well.

Looks like you would want to check all of options under General and Panel. You don't need to worry about Epiphany unless you choose to have users use this browser. Epiphany browser is a light and fast browser with limited features compared to Firefox. It uses Webkit engine.

Applets are what goes onto panel. This include Main Menu and Status Bar. It looks like you can choose to disable user from adding certain applets.

As for your question 3, I saw a line on the page you linked: "Please note that you should apply these rules by logging in as main admin user of the system, and thus these rules will apply to all other users." So you should run this command in your administrator account with sudo/gksu to run as a root, if it doesn't do that already.


Edit: I found the gshutdown program but it seems like the user can turn it off. Working on the command line options. Perhaps I could combine it with the previous script. Also, I added in rm -rf commands in the script to delete files in Documents and Downloads. I wonder if I can empty the trash


One way I found is to install Gnomenu applet. It's basically Vista-like start menu. I use this on my system.

Now before you tell me that you don't need that, what it gives me is the command line option to restart the system, even if you don't enable the applet. Installation to Ubuntu

Once you install that, this command should reboot the machine: python -u /usr/lib/gnomenu/session-manager.py reboot

I know, that's kind of a long way, and there probably are more elegant ways to do that...

As for Trash, it's located at /home/[username]/.local/share/Trash (case sensitive). But if the lockdown manager works well, then users shouldn't be able to save any files. Then you shouldn't really have to delete anything. I have not tried it, so I don't know.

enterkey - I appreciate your guidance and your patience. I am getting this PC ready for shared / patron use at a non profit. Ubuntu has come a long way - and there is almost no learning curve for users. And, if you don't need anything fancy - Ubuntu is magic right of the box. I have had a Ubuntu PC running for several months to drive a monitor display - but that's just a plain vanilla install. The configuration is a little tricky for a long time DOS/Windows guy who's had little Unix background.

Thanks again. I've run out of time today to work on this - but I would appreciate it if you can continue to check in from time to time to answer my "ignorant newbie" questions

I am attempting to use kshutdown to force a reboot, and it fails.

What am I doing wrong? (For test purposes I am running it from terminal)
terminal window said: kshutdown -r GDM = 1 GNOME = 1 KDE Full Session = 0 KDE 3 = 0 KDE 4 = 0 KDM = 0 kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_klauncher.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kded4.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kbuildsycoca4.so kbuildsycoca4 running...
<unknown program name>(6459)/: Communication problem with "kshutdown" , it probably crashed.
Error message was: "org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.NoReply" : " "Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken." "

ellory said: enterkey - I appreciate your guidance and your patience. I am getting this PC ready for shared / patron use at a non profit. Ubuntu has come a long way - and there is almost no learning curve for users. And, if you don't need anything fancy - Ubuntu is magic right of the box. I have had a Ubuntu PC running for several months to drive a monitor display - but that's just a plain vanilla install. The configuration is a little tricky for a long time DOS/Windows guy who's had little Unix background.

Thanks again. I've run out of time today to work on this - but I would appreciate it if you can continue to check in from time to time to answer my "ignorant newbie" questions

Ubuntu has come long way. I've been using it for two years now.

Obviously, I was originally lured toward it because it was a free and alternative OS to Windows. But I quickly realized that what I really enjoy about it is its community. I bugged my co-worker who recommended me Ubuntu in the first place, and I seeked help on Ubuntu forums. Virtually everyone was willing to help, even if the question was dumb or repeats.

So it's only natural that I do the same thing, now that I have some knowledge to help. I am no expert, but I try to help those who are willing to tip-toe into the world of Ubuntu, and give back whenever I can.

I am happy to see people like you consider trying it out (even if some people end up not liking it).

ellory said: I am attempting to use kshutdown to force a reboot, and it fails.

What am I doing wrong? (For test purposes I am running it from terminal)
terminal window said: kshutdown -r GDM = 1 GNOME = 1 KDE Full Session = 0 KDE 3 = 0 KDE 4 = 0 KDM = 0 kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_klauncher.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kded4.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kbuildsycoca4.so kbuildsycoca4 running...
<unknown program name>(6459)/: Communication problem with "kshutdown" , it probably crashed.
Error message was: "org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.NoReply" : " "Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken." "


I can't tell exactly what went wrong ...

How did you install kshutdown? kshutdown is a KDE app. Ubuntu has Gnome desktop by default, but not KDE. What that means is that by default, KDE libraries are not loaded onto Ubuntu. So I am guessing that some dependencies to the library are missing.

If you installed kshutdown through Synaptic, it would've probably prompted to install the entire KDE desktop. While Gnome desktop would still be available (it would be selectable at the log in screen), I don't think you need two types of desktops in your system.

A variant of Ubuntu called Kubuntu uses KDE by default, if you want to see what the KDE is about (try it on Live CD, if you want). It seems to offer more Windows style desktop environment than Gnome desktop.

enterkey said: ellory said: I am attempting to use kshutdown to force a reboot, and it fails.

What am I doing wrong? (For test purposes I am running it from terminal)
terminal window said: kshutdown -r GDM = 1 GNOME = 1 KDE Full Session = 0 KDE 3 = 0 KDE 4 = 0 KDM = 0 kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_klauncher.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kded4.so kdeinit4:
preparing to launch /usr/lib/libkdeinit4_kbuildsycoca4.so kbuildsycoca4 running...
<unknown program name>(6459)/: Communication problem with "kshutdown" , it probably crashed.
Error message was: "org.freedesktop.DBus.Error.NoReply" : " "Did not receive a reply. Possible causes include: the remote application did not send a reply, the message bus security policy blocked the reply, the reply timeout expired, or the network connection was broken." "


I can't tell exactly what went wrong ...

How did you install kshutdown? kshutdown is a KDE app. Ubuntu has Gnome desktop by default, but not KDE. What that means is that by default, KDE libraries are not loaded onto Ubuntu. So I am guessing that some dependencies to the library are missing.

If you installed kshutdown through Synaptic, it would've probably prompted to install the entire KDE desktop. While Gnome desktop would still be available (it would be selectable at the log in screen), I don't think you need two types of desktops in your system.

A variant of Ubuntu called Kubuntu uses KDE by default, if you want to see what the KDE is about (try it on Live CD, if you want). It seems to offer more Windows style desktop environment than Gnome desktop.
Ok, that explains that. No I don't want two on my desktop. ghutdown returns me to the logon screen instead of restarting as the autologon capability only functions from a full restart. Have to think on this some more

ellory said: Ok, that explains that. No I don't want two on my desktop. ghutdown returns me to the logon screen instead of restarting as the autologon capability only functions from a full restart. Have to think on this some more
I was looking at the information on gshutdown here, and it sounds like it offers what you need.

It says there at it will allow you to reboot, and it even allows you to schedule time with visual notification, which was part of your criteria.(additional info)

This didn't work for you? Maybe this is too old? I wonder if it's available in Synaptic (it's always the first place I check because if a software is there, the installation is very easy).

I also found this article, but it would take a tweaking with caution. The article talks about shutdown, but you can replace that with reboot. Link

1. Lockdown even when run with my admin account, only locksdown the admin account. And if its run in the patron account, of course it can be undone
2. sleep 60m gshutdown with the reboot option does not reboot. It logs off and presents the logon sceen again. And, if I run it with a visible clock (using its built in timer), the user can cancel it

ellory said: 1. Lockdown even when run with my admin account, only locksdown the admin account. And if its run in the patron account, of course it can be undone


I might try to play with this piece of software inside VM because it's something new.

It is very simple to hide the menu item, so users wouldn't see it, though that's not disabling the software. Would that be sufficient for now?


2. gshutdown with the reboot option does not reboot. It logs off and presents the logon sceen again. And, if I run it with a visible clock, the user can cancel it


That's not a true reboot. I am surprised that they'd call that a reboot.

I searched around on web and was again surprised at the small availability of simple shutdown/rebooting task through command line.

I guess if all fails, you could try Gnomenu route that I mentioned previously.

Hiding the menu item is acceptable. I probably want to hide most of them

And, I think I can live with the logout - I will just have to leave a note by the machine to say use password of patron
I have not been able to figure out how to get a countdown clock to show - with a message warning of logout
And I was unable to get the Gnomenu approach to work. I entered the software repository information but did not see Gnomenu in the available software list

Edit: I have added public fox to lock down firefox

ellory said: H
And I was unable to get the Gnomenu approach to work. I entered the software repository information but did not see Gnomenu in the available software list


Did you hit "Reload" in Synaptic after adding the repository and the key?

ellory said: I have not been able to figure out how to get a countdown clock to show - with a message warning of logout

you could install conky and have it call a script that gives the countdown and then logs the user out. The message and timer will appear on the screen wherever you want it to

I had used Ubuntu software center and could not find gnomenu. I do find it under synoptic

The command worked well from terminal. I am testing it in the script

Things I still don't know how to do

1. Display a countdown until logoff timer (that needs to run in parallel with the sleep 60m line in the script)
2. Lock down (or hide the applets) of most/all of the system/user/appearance configuration applets (e.g. screen background, themes, programs that start on startup) that are within the patron account
3. Command line for script to empty trash (I am allowing users to download or save docs, they just need to move them to USB or email them before the session ends)
4. The commands I have to delete files in Documents and downloads don't seem to be working. I need to figure something else out

do you have to use gnome? Fluxbox would be a better fit IMO

I can use anything I want as long as its
1) Free
2) users can navigate the internet, use Office apps,etc

Now I have to google Fluxbox

ellory said: 1. Display a countdown until logoff timer (that needs to run in parallel with the sleep 60m line in the script)

The hardest thing here is stopping the user from breaking out. You could run a script in a transparent terminal with a countdown, but if they have access to another terminal they can kill it

2. Lock down (or hide the applets) of most/all of the system/user/appearance configuration applets (e.g. screen background, themes, programs that start on startup) that are within the patron account

Don't use gnome, sorry

3. Command line for script to empty trash (I am allowing users to download or save docs, they just need to move them to USB or email them before the session ends)
4. The commands I have to delete files in Documents and downloads don't seem to be working. I need to figure something else out


$ rm -rf ~/.Trash/* ~/Documents/*

there's probably an easier way than learning fluxbox if you're somewhat familiar with gnome...

you can always use tilda, which is a quake like console that can show a counter (you just need to install it, and point it to a script that does the counting). The script is trivial with a "while a < b loop", it's ensuring that that thing can't be broken where you'll have the problems

When running Lockdown Manager, try doing this in your admin account:

sudo pessulus

If you simply run it, it would just do the lock down on the current account.

I ran it off the user interface in the admin account. I should be running it in terminal?
Also, Ubuntu is now locking up since I introduced the last script change to use pytho/gnomenu. I'll have to remove it from the script to see if that is the cause

ellory said: I ran it off the user interface in the admin account. I should be running it in terminal?

That would run it without sudo. Try it through terminal and see if that makes difference.

Also, Ubuntu is now locking up since I introduced the last script change to use pytho/gnomenu. I'll have to remove it from the script to see if that is the cause

Damn, I was hoping that command would work...

I did try gshutdown, but like you said, it always gives option to cancel the shutdown/restart process, so I guess it won't work for your purpose.

enterkey said: It is very simple to hide the menu item, so users wouldn't see it, though that's not disabling the software. Would that be sufficient for now?
How do I go about either disabling or hiding the menu items?

Edit: OK - I found main menu and see where I can hide menu items. I also see that I can run it (alacarte) from terminal, so I can hide main menu

Question:
1. If I hide Terminal also is there is still a way that I can hide main menu and still access it again if I need to?
2. Is there a way I can disable the right click menu item on the Desktop that shows the option to Change Desktop Background. Alternatively, can I somehow lockdown the preference so that even if some accesses it, that they can't change it?
3. Is that I can prevent people from saving to the Desktop? (Perhaps make the desktop folder read only? Or perhaps the rsync you mentioned earlier which I have not yet investigated ?)

Edit: I found Sabayon but am uncertain how to install it

ellory said:
1. If I hide Terminal also is there is still a way that I can hide main menu and still access it again if I need to?

Alt-F2 brings "Run" dialog. You can type gnome-terminal to start the terminal.

2. Is there a way I can disable the right click menu item on the Desktop that shows the option to Change Desktop Background. Alternatively, can I somehow lockdown the preference so that even if some accesses it, that they can't change it?

I found no good way to subtract a menu item from the right-lick menu for now. There are ways to add to it...

But I found this article which would at least prevent the background changing. It also mentions Sabayon you mention below, but I'll link to it anyways. Link

3. Is that I can prevent people from saving to the Desktop? (Perhaps make the desktop folder read only? Or perhaps the rsync you mentioned earlier which I have not yet investigated ?)

You can make /home/patron/Desktop a read only.

Edit: I found Sabayon but am uncertain how to install it

When in doubt, try Synaptic. If you do search there, you'll find it. It'll also prompt you that it'd automatically install all the dependencies. This is one of my favorite part of Ubuntu.

The lockup seems to be associated with monitor powersave. python/gnomenu works with a 5m sleep in front of it. However this script never seems to reboot the computer. What am I doing wrong?
'#!/bin/bash
sleep 60m
cd /home/patron/Documents
rm * -r -f
cd /home/patron/Downloads
rm * -r -f
python -u /usr/lib/gnomenu/session-manager.py reboot


Also, what permissions do I need to set on which config folder for patron to prevent desktop changes?

I think I'm close, Along with the above, if i can get the reboot to work and find a countdown timer, I'll call it close enough

When done, I will post all the steps of my configuration in case any one else needs it (or wants to improve on it)

ellory said: The lockup seems to be associated with monitor powersave. python/gnomenu works with a 5m sleep in front of it. However this script never seems to reboot the computer. What am I doing wrong?

Maybe try:

#!/bin/bash
sleep 60m
rm -rf /home/patron/Documents/*
rm -rf /home/patron/Downloads/*
python -u /usr/lib/gnomenu/session-manager.py reboot

Putting switches at the end of the command is Windows/DOS way. You'll find that in Linux, you often put those right after the command, before the file source and/or destination.

Also, what permissions do I need to set on which config folder for patron to prevent desktop changes?

Couldn't you just delete the content of /home/patron/Desktop/* like other directories?

I think the easy thing may actually be to change the owner of Desktop directory. In your admin account:

chown root:root /home/patron/Desktop

It won't be writable without root access, and guest user can't change it back to anything else.

I've been playing around with that counter thing, and here's the best I got. You will need to install tilda and any dependencies

1) create a script called countdown.sh (let's place it in /home/patron/countdown.sh for now) The text is below.

2) run: $ tilda --config
2.1) Set things so it doesn't show in the taskbar and that it runs a custom command instead of the shell. That custom command should be the countdown.sh script (i.e. /home/patron/countdown.sh)

In "Appearance" you can play with the height and width, but I have mine set to 5% height and 58% width so only the script output is shown. I also have transparency enabled at 100% so you just see the text on the screen background


countdown.sh
#!/bin/bash
 
trap "" 1 2 3 15 20

function countdown
{
        local OLD_IFS="${IFS}"
        IFS=":"
        local ARR=( $1 )
        local SECONDS=$((  (ARR[0] * 60 * 60) + (ARR[1] * 60) + ARR[2]  ))
        local START=$(date +%s)
        local END=$((START + SECONDS))
        local CUR=$START

        while [[ $CUR -lt $END ]]
        do
                CUR=$(date +%s)
                LEFT=$((END-CUR))

                printf "r%02d:%02d:%02d" 
                        $((LEFT/3600)) $(( (LEFT/60)%60)) $((LEFT%60))

                sleep 1
        done
        IFS="${OLD_IFS}"
        echo "        "
}

echo "Sessions are limited to one hour.  Press F1 to enable/disable this message."
countdown "00:00:10"
clear
echo "logging you out"

# sync any file-system writes before actually doing it
/bin/sync

# Clear the Documents and wastebasket 
/bin/rm ~/Documents/* > /dev/null 2>&1
/bin/rm ~/.Trash/* > /dev/null 2>&1

# Log the user out
#/enter/path/to/gnome/logout/script/here

# exit gracefully
exit 0



You can adjust the timer in the countdown.sh script (look for 00:00:10 in the script - it's HH:MM:SS) I just made it 10 seconds for testing.

When you run 'tilda', the countdown.sh script should be called within a transparent, borderless window at the top of the screen. You can enable it or disable it with F1. You cannot break out of the script with ctrl-c, ctrl-d or suspend it with ctrl-z. I don't know how to log out in gnome so you'll need to add that too

enterkey said:
chown root:root /home/patron/Desktop

It won't be writable without root access, and guest user can't change it back to anything else.
That worked. Needed to do sudo chown root:root /home/patron/Desktop

Still have to close down the use changing desktop colors.
On my script, looks like in all my editing, I had a character creep into the front line in front of the #!/bin/bash Currently testing it to see if it resolves the issue of the script not operating, but that looks like it solved the problem

Have to check out tilda

ellory said: Have to check out tilda

It's just another terminal program... but I like the way it can be brought to the foreground and sent to the background with one button press and doesn't show up in the taskbar. With the transparency set, it just looks like text on the screen

http://tilda.sourceforge.net/tildaabout.php

Tilda is a Linux terminal taking after the likeness of many classic terminals from first person shooter games, Quake, Doom and Half-Life to name a few, where the terminal has no border and is hidden from the desktop till a key or keys is hit.

What are the range of the screen character positions? (i.e I want the tilda message in the lower right of lower left, not in the upper left)

ellory said: What are the range of the screen character positions? (i.e I want the tilda message in the lower right of lower left, not in the upper left)

$ tilda --config

in the 'Appearance' tab, look for 'Position'. You'll have to play around with the X and Y positions, but it can be done. You can also change the key binding to something other than F1

Just keep it in mind that in Ubuntu, the trash is not at ~/.Trash/*. It's at ~/.local/share/Trash.

enterkey said: Just keep it in mind that in Ubuntu, the trash is not at ~/.Trash/*. It's at ~/.local/share/Trash.

ahh.. thanks. I'm not using ubuntu or gnome here so all paths should probably be checked. (and I deliberately forward std-err to /dev/null so no-one would have seen the error )

Skipping 18 Messages...
Well, no second Ubuntu machine for me. The Ubuntu install hung while starting the install and displayer a corrupt video display. So in the interest of time, I ended up troubleshooting Windows. The user profile in Steady State has some how become corrupted (Speicifcally a file in the IE cache) Not sure how that happened.
So I ended up removing the profile. Creating a new one, and then reapplying Steady State controls



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