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How is Ryan Air compared to major commercial airlines (like Delta)? In other words, if you have traveled using Ryan Air, how was it different than any other flight? The prices look fantastic so what's the catch?

(This is my first post to the travel discussion forum. If I didn't do something right, please reply. I did read the newbie discussion that mentioned Ryan Air's airports being outside cities. But what else is different?)

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Can't say as I have never flown Southwest. But there is normally a queue at least to present your boarding pass and for... (more)

GotRocks (Oct. 27, 2012 @ 1:18p) |

Isn't this the airline that got caught using duct tape?

Why do people rush the gates when its clear they can just rush a ... (more)

greling (Oct. 29, 2012 @ 3:47p) |

Ryan Air is very hit or miss!

There's no assigned seating, and everyone boards at once. On busy flights this can be a com... (more)

bettle (Jan. 23, 2013 @ 9:22p) |

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DSJ said:   http://www.ihateryanair.org/

I'll bring some good loud music and headphones.


You cannot compare to Delta
I would say Ryan air makes Southwest look like Catay Pacific first class international!
The flight attendants just about spit in your face.
I was told I was not allowed to have my Bose headphones even out of my bag before we reached 10000 feet and "I shouldn't be using them anyway"

RyanAir frequently uses smaller airports that are much further away then other major airlines use. For example, RyanAir uses Beauvais Airport, which is 85km away from the center of Paris and is the only public transportation is via bus. Charles de Gaulle and Orly are the main airports in Paris and are accessible via Metro, as well as bus.

Also, you cannot interline with Ryanair (i.e. check your bags to your final destination) even if all of your travel is with ryanair!

personally I've managed to avoid them - the alternatives usually are or a comparable price and whilst you still get treated as cattle, you get treated as kobe beef compared to angus beef

Ryanair is normally used by families or young single people who are willing to put up with the attitude and additional per service fees in return for cheap flights. My nieces and nephews use them for travel withing Europe and as long as you expect bad attitudes and poor service, then you will be okay.

You get what you pay for. I have flown Ryan Air before and I was satisfied. They make you feel like cattle but it is a cheap and fast way to get from point A to B.

Have you ever flown Spirit? If so, then Ryanair is to Spirit as Spirit is to Delta.

Similar to Easyjet. Smallest seats I've ever seen! Cheap though.

I flew Ryan Air last year from London (Gatwick) to Shannon Ireland. I thought the flight attendants were pleasant and one was even joking around on the intercom. I don't have anything bad to say about them but you do get what you pay for. It's general admission seating, we had to walk outside and take stairs to get on the plane and they charge for everything including water. They did take multiple currencies so I was able to use up my GBP change that was of no more use for me. My one way trip was $130 US for two, each with a checked bag. For that price, I would do it again.

Someone said passengers are actually required to service the flights. Like helping push back from the gate, deicing, (un)loading baggage, engine overhaul. They have work overalls in different sizes for people to wear. You do your assigned task, change, then board the plane. Is this true?

bigcat007 said:   Someone said passengers are actually required to service the flights. Like helping push back from the gate, deicing, (un)loading baggage, engine overhaul. They have work overalls in different sizes for people to wear. You do your assigned task, change, then board the plane. Is this true?

During a recent Ryan Air flight, I was on the line to act as co-pilot, but failed the eye test; ended up having to service the lavatories.

bigcat007 said:   Someone said passengers are actually required to service the flights. Like helping push back from the gate, deicing, (un)loading baggage, engine overhaul. They have work overalls in different sizes for people to wear. You do your assigned task, change, then board the plane. Is this true?

Yes, Virginia.

Ryan Air flew our unit from the US to Manas (deploying to Afghanistan). They got us there, but as previously stated, little service other than food.


greling said:   FAIL!

From Greling's article:

===============

(CNNGo) -- Any publicity is good publicity for Dublin-based budget airline Ryanair.

The no-frills airline recently announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft (see below), and that had us wondering: are announcements like their toilet fee and "fat tax" tasteless marketing ploys, or is Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary just really cheap?

Despite wanting to strip their passengers of basic comforts like toilets and seat pockets, Ryanair is doing good business.

Comparing September 2011 with September 2010, Ryanair reported a 6 percent hike in passenger numbers, from 6.84 million to 7.25 million. Through September 2011, the airline carried 76.8 million passengers, reported the airline.

The airline's website also claims that in 2010, profits rose 26 percent to more than 401m (US$551m) despite higher fuel prices, the global recession, and volcanic ash disruptions in the spring.


Ryanair plans one toilet per plane Ryanair's high booking fees and ancillary charges include: 30 (US$41) to check in a bag, 10 (US$14) to pay for flights with a debit or credit card (excluding Visa Electron) and 60 (US$83) to check in sports or music equipment, according to the Telegraph.


So, to honor the success of the self-proclaimed "world's favorite airline" let's take a look at some of its most ingenious money-saving tactics.

1. One toilet per aircraft

In October 2011, Ryanair expressed its intolerance for people with bladders. The budget airline announced that it would remove two or three toilets from its aircraft to make room for six extra seats. Up to 200 passengers and six crew would share a bathroom during the flight, reported the Daily Mail. O'Leary said, "We very rarely use all three toilets on board our aircraft anyway." But apparently he is doing us all a favor. The move "would fundamentally lower air fares by about 5 percent for all passengers, cutting 2 (US$3) from a typical 40 (US$63) ticket." What a steal. Currently, there is no legal stipulation for an airline to provide toilets on its aircraft, but Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan.

2. Charging 1 for toilets
The toilet removal wasn't a surprise to passengers and critics because O'Leary announced in 2010 that Ryanair would charge 1 or 1 for passengers to use the toilet. Stephen McNamara, spokesperson for the airline, told TravelMail: "By charging for the toilets we are hoping to change passenger behavior so that they use the bathroom before or after the flight," according to the Daily Mail. But as of 2011, O'Leary said the plans to "charge a pound to spend a penny" have now been dropped.

3. Standing room only

Looking more and more like cheap suburban public transport, Ryanair announced in July 2010 it was preparing for standing-room-only seats at the back of its 250-strong fleet. A spokesman for Ryanair said that Boeing had been consulted over refitting the fleet with "vertical seats." Passengers would be strapped in while standing up, and tickets for these seats would cost between 4 (US$6) and 8 (US$13). However, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority said the plans would struggle to meet safety requirements. The unnamed spokesman said: "It's aviation law that people have to have a seat belt on for take-off and landing so they would have to be in a seat. I don't know how Mr. O'Leary would get around that one. During turbulence passengers also have to have a seat belt on." In response to criticism for the idea, technological determinist O'Leary suggested haters were a bunch of Luddites who couldn't groove with the changes. "People are always slow to accept the changes that face the aviation industry, even though it is already almost unrecognizable from 20 to 30 years ago," said a Ryanair spokesman, as reported by the Guardian.

4. Charging for overweight passengers

Backpackers around the world put down their Italian gelato when they heard about Ryanair's "fat tax." The airline asked passengers on its website whether or not they should charge for "very large passengers." "Over 100,000 passengers logged on to ryanair.com to take part in our competition and almost one in three (over 30,000) think that very large passengers should be asked to pay a fat tax. The revenues from any such 'fat tax' will be used to lower the airfares for all Ryanair passengers yet further," Ryanair's McNamara said. This time the plan did not go ahead, not out of ethical considerations but because it would be hard to collect the money and would make boarding much slower.

5. Charging extra 40 to print boarding passes
Ryanair currently charges passengers 40 (US$63) to print their boarding pass at the airport. The charge was intended to speed up the check-in process. In January 2011, a passenger took the budget airline to court over the charge in Spain. In October 11 2011, the Barcelona Appeal Court ruled that Ryanair's boarding card was perfectly legal in accordance with Spanish and EU law. The airline's smug response to the verdict on their website was that "less than 1 percent of passengers pay this boarding card reissue penalty which applies only in those rare cases where passengers fail to comply with their agreement, given at the time of booking." Passengers can avoid the reissue penalty by checking in online before leaving for the airport.

=====================

I'd say that O'Leary fellow could use a good stiff knee to the groin.

its the perfect FW airline really, OLeary treats his workers and customers like crap and they love it!
I have used it often, easy jet is nicer, sometimes....
it works for small out of the way places, and the landings are really rough, the captain just drops the place outta the sky onto the runway.
i have flow them maybe 20 times...

for the price it was great. We flew from London (stansted) to Venice then Venice to Rome and finally back to London for about 300usd total for my wife and I. The seats were crammed to gather and didn't recline but the flights weren't more than about 3 hours. Most of the airports they fly to have cheap bus transfers to the city .. the most we paid was 10gbp from central London

Does Ryan Air keep their planes mechanical worthy? Besides the interior infestations i am surprised these planes can even take off.

hlpimconfusedjr said:   Ryan Air flew our unit from the US to Manas (deploying to Afghanistan). They got us there, but as previously stated, little service other than food.
Ryan International Airlines is a US charter airline that does military transport flights.

Ryanair (subject of this thread) is an intra-Europe ultra low cost carrier.

As for opinions, just know what you are getting into before you book anything.

lousygolfer said:   greling said:   FAIL!

From Greling's article:

===============

(CNNGo) -- Any publicity is good publicity for Dublin-based budget airline Ryanair.

The no-frills airline recently announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft (see below), and that had us wondering: are announcements like their toilet fee and "fat tax" tasteless marketing ploys, or is Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary just really cheap?

Despite wanting to strip their passengers of basic comforts like toilets and seat pockets, Ryanair is doing good business.

Comparing September 2011 with September 2010, Ryanair reported a 6 percent hike in passenger numbers, from 6.84 million to 7.25 million. Through September 2011, the airline carried 76.8 million passengers, reported the airline.

The airline's website also claims that in 2010, profits rose 26 percent to more than 401m (US$551m) despite higher fuel prices, the global recession, and volcanic ash disruptions in the spring.


Ryanair plans one toilet per plane Ryanair's high booking fees and ancillary charges include: 30 (US$41) to check in a bag, 10 (US$14) to pay for flights with a debit or credit card (excluding Visa Electron) and 60 (US$83) to check in sports or music equipment, according to the Telegraph.


So, to honor the success of the self-proclaimed "world's favorite airline" let's take a look at some of its most ingenious money-saving tactics.

1. One toilet per aircraft

In October 2011, Ryanair expressed its intolerance for people with bladders. The budget airline announced that it would remove two or three toilets from its aircraft to make room for six extra seats. Up to 200 passengers and six crew would share a bathroom during the flight, reported the Daily Mail. O'Leary said, "We very rarely use all three toilets on board our aircraft anyway." But apparently he is doing us all a favor. The move "would fundamentally lower air fares by about 5 percent for all passengers, cutting 2 (US$3) from a typical 40 (US$63) ticket." What a steal. Currently, there is no legal stipulation for an airline to provide toilets on its aircraft, but Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan.

2. Charging 1 for toilets
The toilet removal wasn't a surprise to passengers and critics because O'Leary announced in 2010 that Ryanair would charge 1 or 1 for passengers to use the toilet. Stephen McNamara, spokesperson for the airline, told TravelMail: "By charging for the toilets we are hoping to change passenger behavior so that they use the bathroom before or after the flight," according to the Daily Mail. But as of 2011, O'Leary said the plans to "charge a pound to spend a penny" have now been dropped.

3. Standing room only

Looking more and more like cheap suburban public transport, Ryanair announced in July 2010 it was preparing for standing-room-only seats at the back of its 250-strong fleet. A spokesman for Ryanair said that Boeing had been consulted over refitting the fleet with "vertical seats." Passengers would be strapped in while standing up, and tickets for these seats would cost between 4 (US$6) and 8 (US$13). However, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority said the plans would struggle to meet safety requirements. The unnamed spokesman said: "It's aviation law that people have to have a seat belt on for take-off and landing so they would have to be in a seat. I don't know how Mr. O'Leary would get around that one. During turbulence passengers also have to have a seat belt on." In response to criticism for the idea, technological determinist O'Leary suggested haters were a bunch of Luddites who couldn't groove with the changes. "People are always slow to accept the changes that face the aviation industry, even though it is already almost unrecognizable from 20 to 30 years ago," said a Ryanair spokesman, as reported by the Guardian.

4. Charging for overweight passengers

Backpackers around the world put down their Italian gelato when they heard about Ryanair's "fat tax." The airline asked passengers on its website whether or not they should charge for "very large passengers." "Over 100,000 passengers logged on to ryanair.com to take part in our competition and almost one in three (over 30,000) think that very large passengers should be asked to pay a fat tax. The revenues from any such 'fat tax' will be used to lower the airfares for all Ryanair passengers yet further," Ryanair's McNamara said. This time the plan did not go ahead, not out of ethical considerations but because it would be hard to collect the money and would make boarding much slower.

5. Charging extra 40 to print boarding passes
Ryanair currently charges passengers 40 (US$63) to print their boarding pass at the airport. The charge was intended to speed up the check-in process. In January 2011, a passenger took the budget airline to court over the charge in Spain. In October 11 2011, the Barcelona Appeal Court ruled that Ryanair's boarding card was perfectly legal in accordance with Spanish and EU law. The airline's smug response to the verdict on their website was that "less than 1 percent of passengers pay this boarding card reissue penalty which applies only in those rare cases where passengers fail to comply with their agreement, given at the time of booking." Passengers can avoid the reissue penalty by checking in online before leaving for the airport.

=====================

I'd say that O'Leary fellow could use a good stiff knee to the groin.


Um, why? He's selling a product I have no interest in buying, but he's not hiding what the product is...

lousygolfer said:   greling said:   FAIL!

From Greling's article:

===============

(CNNGo) -- Any publicity is good publicity for Dublin-based budget airline Ryanair.

The no-frills airline recently announced plans to cut down to just one toilet per aircraft (see below), and that had us wondering: are announcements like their toilet fee and "fat tax" tasteless marketing ploys, or is Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary just really cheap?

Despite wanting to strip their passengers of basic comforts like toilets and seat pockets, Ryanair is doing good business.

Comparing September 2011 with September 2010, Ryanair reported a 6 percent hike in passenger numbers, from 6.84 million to 7.25 million. Through September 2011, the airline carried 76.8 million passengers, reported the airline.

The airline's website also claims that in 2010, profits rose 26 percent to more than 401m (US$551m) despite higher fuel prices, the global recession, and volcanic ash disruptions in the spring.


Ryanair plans one toilet per plane Ryanair's high booking fees and ancillary charges include: 30 (US$41) to check in a bag, 10 (US$14) to pay for flights with a debit or credit card (excluding Visa Electron) and 60 (US$83) to check in sports or music equipment, according to the Telegraph.


So, to honor the success of the self-proclaimed "world's favorite airline" let's take a look at some of its most ingenious money-saving tactics.

1. One toilet per aircraft

In October 2011, Ryanair expressed its intolerance for people with bladders. The budget airline announced that it would remove two or three toilets from its aircraft to make room for six extra seats. Up to 200 passengers and six crew would share a bathroom during the flight, reported the Daily Mail. O'Leary said, "We very rarely use all three toilets on board our aircraft anyway." But apparently he is doing us all a favor. The move "would fundamentally lower air fares by about 5 percent for all passengers, cutting 2 (US$3) from a typical 40 (US$63) ticket." What a steal. Currently, there is no legal stipulation for an airline to provide toilets on its aircraft, but Ryanair has not announced a date to implement the plan.

2. Charging 1 for toilets
The toilet removal wasn't a surprise to passengers and critics because O'Leary announced in 2010 that Ryanair would charge 1 or 1 for passengers to use the toilet. Stephen McNamara, spokesperson for the airline, told TravelMail: "By charging for the toilets we are hoping to change passenger behavior so that they use the bathroom before or after the flight," according to the Daily Mail. But as of 2011, O'Leary said the plans to "charge a pound to spend a penny" have now been dropped.

3. Standing room only

Looking more and more like cheap suburban public transport, Ryanair announced in July 2010 it was preparing for standing-room-only seats at the back of its 250-strong fleet. A spokesman for Ryanair said that Boeing had been consulted over refitting the fleet with "vertical seats." Passengers would be strapped in while standing up, and tickets for these seats would cost between 4 (US$6) and 8 (US$13). However, a spokesman for the Civil Aviation Authority said the plans would struggle to meet safety requirements. The unnamed spokesman said: "It's aviation law that people have to have a seat belt on for take-off and landing so they would have to be in a seat. I don't know how Mr. O'Leary would get around that one. During turbulence passengers also have to have a seat belt on." In response to criticism for the idea, technological determinist O'Leary suggested haters were a bunch of Luddites who couldn't groove with the changes. "People are always slow to accept the changes that face the aviation industry, even though it is already almost unrecognizable from 20 to 30 years ago," said a Ryanair spokesman, as reported by the Guardian.

4. Charging for overweight passengers

Backpackers around the world put down their Italian gelato when they heard about Ryanair's "fat tax." The airline asked passengers on its website whether or not they should charge for "very large passengers." "Over 100,000 passengers logged on to ryanair.com to take part in our competition and almost one in three (over 30,000) think that very large passengers should be asked to pay a fat tax. The revenues from any such 'fat tax' will be used to lower the airfares for all Ryanair passengers yet further," Ryanair's McNamara said. This time the plan did not go ahead, not out of ethical considerations but because it would be hard to collect the money and would make boarding much slower.

5. Charging extra 40 to print boarding passes
Ryanair currently charges passengers 40 (US$63) to print their boarding pass at the airport. The charge was intended to speed up the check-in process. In January 2011, a passenger took the budget airline to court over the charge in Spain. In October 11 2011, the Barcelona Appeal Court ruled that Ryanair's boarding card was perfectly legal in accordance with Spanish and EU law. The airline's smug response to the verdict on their website was that "less than 1 percent of passengers pay this boarding card reissue penalty which applies only in those rare cases where passengers fail to comply with their agreement, given at the time of booking." Passengers can avoid the reissue penalty by checking in online before leaving for the airport.

=====================

I'd say that O'Leary fellow could use a good stiff knee to the groin.


Why, because he's trying to provide the cheapest flight possible? Don't like them, fly with someone else...

If you have a weak stomach, I suggest you stay away. 2 out of the 10-15 Ryan Air flights I have taken have experienced a sudden and severe drop in altitude. Don't know if it is the pilot or the plane, but on one trip from Scotland to Ireland everyone on the plane was quiet or dozing, then the plane dropped and one lady in the middle got so scared she screamed bloody murder as she awoke from a nap. I have never before or since truly thought I was going to die. Good adrenaline rush.

Ummm- is it this airline? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_International_Airlines

They definately flew us to Manas.

hlpimconfusedjr said:   Ummm- is it this airline? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_International_Airlines

They definately flew us to Manas.


Believe it or not, it is a different airline - in fact, there are 3 completely seperate airlines with the word "Ryan" in it's name.

■ Ryanair, a budget airline based in the Republic of Ireland
■ Ryan International Airlines, a charter airline with US government contracts
■ Ryan Air Services, a cargo airline operating in Alaska

I pulled a muscle while attaching and removing the tow bar to the nose wheel when I flew out for a football game. Can I be reimbursed?

chripuck said:   lousygolfer said:   
I'd say that O'Leary fellow could use a good stiff knee to the groin.


Why, because he's trying to provide the cheapest flight possible? Don't like them, fly with someone else...


Uhhhhmmmmmmm.... duuuuhhhhhhhhhh...... because using a toilet is a basic human necessity and limiting planes to one toilet for up to 200 people is ridiculous? If you haven't had to stand in line waiting uncomfortably on a plane run by a normal carrier to use one of its 2-6 toilets, you clearly haven't traveled much. If RyanAir decides in the long run it will save them money on maintenance, even considering payouts in plane crash lawsuits, by doubling the service intervals and only employing mechanics who will take minimum wage, is that OK too?

If your wife's boss calls her a dumb bimbo, a stupid female and a slut and pays her 30% less than an incompetent male co-worker with half her experience, do you just shrug and say "So what? Don't like how they do business there, then get a job someplace else? Don't be a whiner just because your boss is a profit-minded business owner."

=======================

Now on the issue of overweight airline passengers, that's a different story and I do commend this O'Leary for at least raising the issue, because it is a serious problem. I've spent 6 hours on a completely booked flight (i.e. no other seats to which I could move) with a 350lb fatty next to me overflowing a good 20-30% into my seat area and that was a very uncomfortable, aggravating experience, not the least because there were folds and crevices on that person's bulk that had not seen water, soap and a washcloth in who knows how long and the smell was awful. There are very few morbidly obese people who for legitimate medical reasons cannot, through reasonable efforts on their part, lose weight. I resent having to be discomforted by someone who forces their body into contact with mine in this fashion. Obese passengers should be required to upgrade, at their own expense, to a business or 1st class seat; they have to pay extra for fabric costs to buy a 6XL shirt over a L, so why shouldn't they similarly have to pay more for a larger, more costly airline seat?.

Charge for checked bags. In fact they pretty much charge for everything.
No assigned seats - it's a free-for-all at boarding.
Seats do not recline - at all.
FAs sell stuff on the flight - food, drinks, raffle tickets, bus tickets, phone cards - it is super annoying for someone who just wants some peace and quiet.
Point-to-point service only. So if you want to go from A to C via B, you have to buy 2 tickets - A to B and B to C. And if your first flight is delayed, RyanAir will not assist you at all - you are SOL.
One bag to carry on and they mean it. So if you have a carry-on and then buy a sandwich and a coke at the airport, you will either have to eat the sandwich and drink the coke before boarding or your lunch must fit inside your carry-on.
They charge an extra service fee if you use anything other than their credit card.
Watch everything when booking because they set defaults to charge you extra for things.
Their customer service is pretty much non-existent. Absolutely the worst I have ever seen for any industry.

Personally, I can tolerate RyanAir for a 1-2 hour flight, anything more than that and I might go postal.

I flew RyanAir once a month from Bratislava to Frankfurt Hahn for a year for weekends when I lived in Slovakia a few years ago. They were incredibly cheap and I got to explore Germany. Most recently I flew from Larnaca to Brussels- Charleroi. RyanAir is my last choice!

smahs said:   hlpimconfusedjr said:   Ummm- is it this airline? http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryan_International_Airlines

They definately flew us to Manas.


Believe it or not, it is a different airline - in fact, there are 3 completely seperate airlines with the word "Ryan" in it's name.

■ Ryanair, a budget airline based in the Republic of Ireland
■ Ryan International Airlines, a charter airline with US government contracts
■ Ryan Air Services, a cargo airline operating in Alaska

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ryanair

That's the Ryanair the OP is talking about

lousygolfer said:   chripuck said:   lousygolfer said:   
I'd say that O'Leary fellow could use a good stiff knee to the groin.


Why, because he's trying to provide the cheapest flight possible? Don't like them, fly with someone else...


Uhhhhmmmmmmm.... duuuuhhhhhhhhhh...... because using a toilet is a basic human necessity and limiting planes to one toilet for up to 200 people is ridiculous? If you haven't had to stand in line waiting uncomfortably on a plane run by a normal carrier to use one of its 2-6 toilets, you clearly haven't traveled much. If RyanAir decides in the long run it will save them money on maintenance, even considering payouts in plane crash lawsuits, by doubling the service intervals and only employing mechanics who will take minimum wage, is that OK too?

If your wife's boss calls her a dumb bimbo, a stupid female and a slut and pays her 30% less than an incompetent male co-worker with half her experience, do you just shrug and say "So what? Don't like how they do business there, then get a job someplace else? Don't be a whiner just because your boss is a profit-minded business owner."

=======================

Now on the issue of overweight airline passengers, that's a different story and I do commend this O'Leary for at least raising the issue, because it is a serious problem. I've spent 6 hours on a completely booked flight (i.e. no other seats to which I could move) with a 350lb fatty next to me overflowing a good 20-30% into my seat area and that was a very uncomfortable, aggravating experience, not the least because there were folds and crevices on that person's bulk that had not seen water, soap and a washcloth in who knows how long and the smell was awful. There are very few morbidly obese people who for legitimate medical reasons cannot, through reasonable efforts on their part, lose weight. I resent having to be discomforted by someone who forces their body into contact with mine in this fashion. Obese passengers should be required to upgrade, at their own expense, to a business or 1st class seat; they have to pay extra for fabric costs to buy a 6XL shirt over a L, so why shouldn't they similarly have to pay more for a larger, more costly airline seat?.


Oh give me a break, you're exaggerating the need for toilets. Being able to pee somewhere is a creature comfort, not a necessity over a short flight (which is what Ryanair typically flies.) These guys don't do transatlantic, they do mostly puddle jumps. Pee before you get on the plane and if you're like me, don't drink anything 4 hours before you fly.

Raynair is a good choice for weekend trips, when you need just a carryon. You must realize, that chances for a comfort are very slim, when you are paying $30-60 per round trip within Europe. Once I paid more for a taxi trip to the airport than Raynair tcket. If you don't book early in advance, you end up paying prices close to major airlines, especialy if you add checked in baggage, priority boarding and so on.
Come on, how high your expectations could be if you pay $60-70 for London-Barcelona round trip?
Remember, Raynair uses mostly smaller airports further from the cities - extra time and expense to reach your point of destination.
My advice use it if you want to save in expense of comfort and time. Otherwise avoid it.

Get a British Airways credit card (or Chase Sapphire Points) to use Avios for short haul flights within Europe - actual cost ends up being about the same as Ryan Air, without all of the hassles, fees.

GotRocks said:   
No assigned seats - it's a free-for-all at boarding.


Southwest?

Seats do not recline - at all.


Many would say this is a huge perk with no fear of someone in front of you rudely reclining.

FAs sell stuff on the flight - food, drinks, raffle tickets, bus tickets, phone cards - it is super annoying for someone who just wants some peace and quiet.

Doesn't seem so bad when this certainly generates a lot of advertising money for them, in exchange lowering fares.

vegetation said:   GotRocks said:   
No assigned seats - it's a free-for-all at boarding.


Southwest?


How is boarding with Ryanair? The gates open and people just rush in or is it similar to southwest?

pkny said:   vegetation said:   GotRocks said:   
No assigned seats - it's a free-for-all at boarding.


Southwest?


How is boarding with Ryanair? The gates open and people just rush in or is it similar to southwest?


Can't say as I have never flown Southwest. But there is normally a queue at least to present your boarding pass and for them to check your ID. After that it is a free-for-all. You typically board by walking out on the tarmac (no jetbridges) and you can board from the front or the back of the plane. People who can walk fast can gain some ground here.

Isn't this the airline that got caught using duct tape?

Why do people rush the gates when its clear they can just rush a window mid-flight?

Ryan Air is very hit or miss!

There's no assigned seating, and everyone boards at once. On busy flights this can be a complete horror-show and if your polite and courteous then you'll be trod over. They also charge for almost everything; for example if you can't print your own boarding pass they will charge you. If you can't book online, they will charge you, if you miss a connecting flight because of them, they will not reimburse you even if the connecting flight is with them!(RyanAir class themselves as a point-to-point airline).

Also, many of the airports they land at, are not that near their named destination. For example, I flew with them to Brussels-Charleroi airport which is about 30 miles south of Brussels. When we arrived we had to wait an hour for the bus into the Brussels that cost 20 or 30 euros (I forget the exact price) and then that took an hour and a half to get to Brussels.

If we had flowen to Brussels' main airport (with Aer Lingus for 30 euro more each) we could have caught a train direct to the city that runs more often, costs less, and saved a lot of time (and it wouldn't have cost that much more after including the bus fare from Charleroi). If you fly with them you really need to do your research to make sure that where your flying to, is where you think your going and that there are actually transport options out of the airport. For example, friends landed at a airport in rural France late in the evening and there were no buses or taxis and they had to get a lift from a fellow passanger to the nearest town.

My advise? If it's a short flight of less than 2 hours and the flight is cheap, and you don't have a lot of bags, then go for it. If the flight is long, and you need to catch a connection, or your time is short, then don't use them. And do you research!

This gives you a good overview:

http://www.flightnetwork.com/airlines/ryanair/

Boards.ie has some interesting threads about Ryan Air:

http://www.boards.ie/vbulletin/tags.php?tag=ryanair

I've flown them twice, once in the 1990's and once a few years ago. In the 1990's they offered some level of service and assistance, today forget about it. One funny story, when I flew them in the 1990's (from London to Dublin) there were 2 pilots from some US airline sitting near me, they were quite surprise about how quickly and hard the plane took off and how hard the landing was in Dublin.



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