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morecowbell said: i know this post has long since past...

On the contrary, many folks, like me, follow this thread for new/improved ideas and good deal hunting tips/updated info always come in handy so please keep posting and commenting!

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hope this proves useful so i can find some deals

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Another great deal for travel if you come to Israel is to rent a car with Hertz. They have recently extended a winter deal that they had going which can save the consumer at least a hundred dollars. Besides for good rental rates, you can receive free second drivers, free insurance and no airport fees.
For more info see www.israeltravelsavings.com

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just wanted to rec' our daily bread..tell me how

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how can i rec "our daily bread??????

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yoregano said: Whatatay said: Don't reply with "Thanks OP".
Wow, some touchy people here giving you red. I agree with you. If you want to say thanks, at least say something else relevant. A post of "thanks" or "in for one," etc., and nothing more is pointless. It contributes nothing to a thread and just takes up space. If you like a deal (or not), that's what the ratings bar is for. These must be the same people that get all hung up in the MCR thread if someone doesn't post "RNBM."

Update: Glad to see the green has overtaken the red in the post I refer to above. There are a few sensible people on this board after all.


vsfoxe said: Do not INVENT acronyms. See the FAQ: Text. If the acronym is not there, don't use it. Perhaps consider submitting it for addition to the list. Everyone can refer to the list, but not everyone can GUESS what a new acronym is trying to convey.

OK, IHNI, I RTFM, WTH does RNBM mean? And what is this MCR thread? Link it up, or spell it out.

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OK, IHNI, I RTFM, WTH does RNBM mean? And what is this MCR thread? Link it up, or spell it out.

MCR= MyCokeRewards HERE

Q: I see RBM or RNBM posted all the time in this thread. What do they mean?

A: RBM = Redeemed By Me; RNBM = Redeemed, Not By Me

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Didn't scan the rest of the thread, but wanted to add this.

If you want to know grocery and drug store deals matched with coupons hit up <hotcouponworld.com>

They have stores by region, and a fantastic up to date, searchable coupon database. They are a huge community with hundreds of active members from all across the US. They are masters at saving on groceries and personal items.

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zman29817 said: how can i rec "our daily bread??????

I get mine off the tube.

Lots of different denominations.

Lots-Lots if you have cable!!!

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I love the guys giving green to every post for achievements. Someone should tell them that you don't get anything...

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good mournin im new here thanks for all the info

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Maybe they green you because they like your comment. Green! BTW, I earned my badges the hard way. But if you got any tricks for getting other badges, I'm all for it.

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Puff, did you find any new ways of getting new badges? never been greened before....

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rbraden said:   I love the guys giving green to every post for achievements. Someone should tell them that you don't get anything...

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Hello ~ looks like a lot of good stuff here!!!

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I never knew about the Welcome forum until yesterday, otherwise, I'd have posted to this thread long ago.

1) Don't just look for advertised specials. Advertised specials are great and all, but it is not uncommon for unadvertised specials to far exceed the advertised ones in terms of discount. I have noticed this happens alot with technology (Newegg, Staples, and Office Max are three that come to mind). If you're in the market for something, periodically dig through the merchant websites a little bit. Sorting by price makes deal finding much easier, but realize that sorting this way may not reveal rebates depending on the retailer, so further clicking may be required.

2) Rebates, especially those not widely advertised. Obviously the fine print is tricky, and they can be unreliable, but as long as one takes the necessary precautions, they can be awesome. maOf particular interest are those that are on manufacturer's websites because these are often not accounted for by retailers. So, for example, a store could heavily discount a product unaware that there is also a manufacturer's rebate on it. Also a retailer may offer a rebate, but only advertise it one week when it is valid for four. This provides a window to stack with another deal (see 3).

3) Stack, stack, stack. There are a couple of ways this can be great, but essentially it is taking advantage of multiple promotions on one product. In my opinion, this is the greatest way to score deals. One type of sale that always gets my attention is when there is an advertised deal for a general class of products (for example, $250 off any TV 50" or larger or $20 gift card with the purchase of any GPS, etc). I then look at advertised and unadvertised prices that could be used in conjunction with this promotion. The more deals you stack, the better the savings.

Here's an example. Staples annually(?) runs a printer recycling program that knocks $50 off the price of a printers whose regular price is over a certain price. The promo runs for many weeks (usually around 8). Staples also frequently has coupons, sales (or clearance), and sometimes rebates. So in theory, it would be possible to buy a printer that is on sale and has a rebate using a coupon and recycling a printer. That's four total discounts.

4) Be familiar with certain merchant tendencies. This ties in with 3) to an extent, but other tendencies can pop up. For example, Newegg has combo deals that can make it so that if you are buying Product A, buying B as well is very cheap, free, or even cheaper than buying A by itself. Rebates can play a large role here too, so be sure to account for those (again, they may not show up every time a product is listed).

5) Amazon marketplace can be awesome, especially if you are looking for CDs, DVDs, and games that are not recently released. When I first got my XBox 360, I was looking for ways to build a cheap library. Amazon marketplace allowed me to average about $5 a game brand new for a while. I also get movies in the $2-$4 range frequently. From experience, just be wary of fake imports...open and test the media immediately to verify the contents as being satisfactory. (In fairness, many sellers on AM don't realize they are selling goods of a lesser quality.)

6) Just be patient and shop for things you would be shopping for anyway. You will find something worth posting.

I hope this helps...and happy hunting.

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Is there anyone who can solve my problem easily

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imv

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If you have a smartphone, install the "Barcode Scanner" app. There will be times when you're in a B&M store, and you're curious how the sticker price stacks up against prices online. Naturally, the online reviews are helpful as well.

The barcode scanner app, especially when used in conjunction with the Amazon app, provides a fast and easy way to do this.

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DoctorDeals said:   I never knew about the Welcome forum until yesterday, otherwise, I'd have posted to this thread long ago.

1) Don't just look for advertised specials. Advertised specials are great and all, but it is not uncommon for unadvertised specials to far exceed the advertised ones in terms of discount. I have noticed this happens alot with technology (Newegg, Staples, and Office Max are three that come to mind). If you're in the market for something, periodically dig through the merchant websites a little bit. Sorting by price makes deal finding much easier, but realize that sorting this way may not reveal rebates depending on the retailer, so further clicking may be required.

2) Rebates, especially those not widely advertised. Obviously the fine print is tricky, and they can be unreliable, but as long as one takes the necessary precautions, they can be awesome. maOf particular interest are those that are on manufacturer's websites because these are often not accounted for by retailers. So, for example, a store could heavily discount a product unaware that there is also a manufacturer's rebate on it. Also a retailer may offer a rebate, but only advertise it one week when it is valid for four. This provides a window to stack with another deal (see 3).

3) Stack, stack, stack. There are a couple of ways this can be great, but essentially it is taking advantage of multiple promotions on one product. In my opinion, this is the greatest way to score deals. One type of sale that always gets my attention is when there is an advertised deal for a general class of products (for example, $250 off any TV 50" or larger or $20 gift card with the purchase of any GPS, etc). I then look at advertised and unadvertised prices that could be used in conjunction with this promotion. The more deals you stack, the better the savings.

Here's an example. Staples annually(?) runs a printer recycling program that knocks $50 off the price of a printers whose regular price is over a certain price. The promo runs for many weeks (usually around 8). Staples also frequently has coupons, sales (or clearance), and sometimes rebates. So in theory, it would be possible to buy a printer that is on sale and has a rebate using a coupon and recycling a printer. That's four total discounts.

4) Be familiar with certain merchant tendencies. This ties in with 3) to an extent, but other tendencies can pop up. For example, Newegg has combo deals that can make it so that if you are buying Product A, buying B as well is very cheap, free, or even cheaper than buying A by itself. Rebates can play a large role here too, so be sure to account for those (again, they may not show up every time a product is listed).

5) Amazon marketplace can be awesome, especially if you are looking for CDs, DVDs, and games that are not recently released. When I first got my XBox 360, I was looking for ways to build a cheap library. Amazon marketplace allowed me to average about $5 a game brand new for a while. I also get movies in the $2-$4 range frequently. From experience, just be wary of fake imports...open and test the media immediately to verify the contents as being satisfactory. (In fairness, many sellers on AM don't realize they are selling goods of a lesser quality.)

6) Just be patient and shop for things you would be shopping for anyway. You will find something worth posting.

I hope this helps...and happy hunting.


Good stuff. Thank you.

rated:
DoctorDeals said:   I never knew about the Welcome forum until yesterday, otherwise, I'd have posted to this thread long ago.

1) Don't just look for advertised specials. Advertised specials are great and all, but it is not uncommon for unadvertised specials to far exceed the advertised ones in terms of discount. I have noticed this happens alot with technology (Newegg, Staples, and Office Max are three that come to mind). If you're in the market for something, periodically dig through the merchant websites a little bit. Sorting by price makes deal finding much easier, but realize that sorting this way may not reveal rebates depending on the retailer, so further clicking may be required.

2) Rebates, especially those not widely advertised. Obviously the fine print is tricky, and they can be unreliable, but as long as one takes the necessary precautions, they can be awesome. maOf particular interest are those that are on manufacturer's websites because these are often not accounted for by retailers. So, for example, a store could heavily discount a product unaware that there is also a manufacturer's rebate on it. Also a retailer may offer a rebate, but only advertise it one week when it is valid for four. This provides a window to stack with another deal (see 3).

3) Stack, stack, stack. There are a couple of ways this can be great, but essentially it is taking advantage of multiple promotions on one product. In my opinion, this is the greatest way to score deals. One type of sale that always gets my attention is when there is an advertised deal for a general class of products (for example, $250 off any TV 50" or larger or $20 gift card with the purchase of any GPS, etc). I then look at advertised and unadvertised prices that could be used in conjunction with this promotion. The more deals you stack, the better the savings.

Here's an example. Staples annually(?) runs a printer recycling program that knocks $50 off the price of a printers whose regular price is over a certain price. The promo runs for many weeks (usually around 8). Staples also frequently has coupons, sales (or clearance), and sometimes rebates. So in theory, it would be possible to buy a printer that is on sale and has a rebate using a coupon and recycling a printer. That's four total discounts.

4) Be familiar with certain merchant tendencies. This ties in with 3) to an extent, but other tendencies can pop up. For example, Newegg has combo deals that can make it so that if you are buying Product A, buying B as well is very cheap, free, or even cheaper than buying A by itself. Rebates can play a large role here too, so be sure to account for those (again, they may not show up every time a product is listed).

5) Amazon marketplace can be awesome, especially if you are looking for CDs, DVDs, and games that are not recently released. When I first got my XBox 360, I was looking for ways to build a cheap library. Amazon marketplace allowed me to average about $5 a game brand new for a while. I also get movies in the $2-$4 range frequently. From experience, just be wary of fake imports...open and test the media immediately to verify the contents as being satisfactory. (In fairness, many sellers on AM don't realize they are selling goods of a lesser quality.)

6) Just be patient and shop for things you would be shopping for anyway. You will find something worth posting.

I hope this helps...and happy hunting.


Thanks, great tips.

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great info.. Thanks OP

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FeloniusMonkey said:   If you have a smartphone, install the "Barcode Scanner" app. There will be times when you're in a B&M store, and you're curious how the sticker price stacks up against prices online. Naturally, the online reviews are helpful as well.

The barcode scanner app, especially when used in conjunction with the Amazon app, provides a fast and easy way to do this.


thanks.

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frankiemuniz01 said:   Is there anyone who can solve my problem easily

Can you be more spefic on the nature of the issue?

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May I want to more about deal hunter. I have lots of interest in the deal hunter.

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  • See a good deal @ Amazon? Check with the Camel to see how prices were in the past.
  • Have a very specific product at a good price? Double check with froogle (Google's price comparison), you might find it cheaper elsewhere.
  • Use the search feature here @ FW. You might find that the deal you think is great, was actually posted a week ago for even less.

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If you discover a ridiculous deal that may be a price error. Put in a disclaimer "do not call".

Nothing kills deals faster than a flock of deal hunters calling to verify a price mistake.

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sdsendoh said:   If you discover a ridiculous deal that may be a price error. Put in a disclaimer "do not call".

Nothing kills deals faster than a flock of deal hunters calling to verify a price mistake.

Sometimes a price mistake will get cancelled anyway, as in the case of this thread:
http://www.fatwallet.com/forums/expired-deals/1239989/m17377981/...

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it seems deals are always better when you don't need them, and never there when you do.

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Nope!

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bittul said:   

  • See a good deal @ Amazon? Check with the Camel   to see how prices were in the past.


  
Expanding on bittul's post, you can use the Camel  to find new hot deals as well.  Click on the "Top Price Drops" option under the "Amazon Products" drop down then select the "Most recent Amazon price drops" search feature to discover new price drops before anyone else.  You can limit the search feature to a certain percentage in price drop but this is not recommended.  Remember that Amazon sometimes drops prices in small increments repeatedly, one right after another.  So the search feature might say that the price has only dropped something like 5% but it might be a much larger price drop with all the incremental price drops combined. Look for a product price drop that interests you and click on it.  The Camel  will tell you if price is a Good Deal (closest to lowest price on record) or the Best Price (lowest price on record).  Good Hunting!        

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jason1222 said:   I would say that in addition to this generally good advice (above) you should sit down and decide what it is exactly you want/need before online deal-hunting. Often, finding a good deal can overpower your ability to decide if you need a product or not. Just because you find a nice shirt on Overstock.com   for 80% off does not mean you need a new shirt. I have personally spent a lot of unnecessary time deal-hunting for the sake of deal-hunting and realize only later that if I'm not ever wearing that shirt than any price I paid for it was too much.
  

You are so right, I just purchased some pants, that now that I have them, I am wondering if I will ever wear them, and feel that return them is not worth the hassle.  I will probably give them away to a friend.  I liked the idea and looks of them, but, well, live and learn!

And I do appreciate all of the helpful hints here, and I am still reading them, but had to comment on this post.

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nice forums, just a personal shopping center

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