Epipen Discounts?

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Hello, I'm trying to find an Epipen for my bee allergy. I have a HDHP and HSA medical plan. The best I can get with that discount and the "$0 copay" offer through epipen is about $530. Any tips for getting the price down?

I also saw people selling their epipens on eBay. Is that even legal? Should I do that?

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The Epipen manufacturer is quickly rolling out their own "generic":

From an article published on August 29th:

"...drugmake... (more)

oppidum (Aug. 30, 2016 @ 12:51p) |

They have also expanded their "savings card" program -- details are in the linked article below.

One thing I saw was that... (more)

oppidum (Aug. 30, 2016 @ 12:58p) |

Mylan CEO defends drastic rise in cost of life-saving EpiPens to angry lawmakers

[Her salary was 18 million dollars last ... (more)

oppidum (Sep. 22, 2016 @ 12:45p) |

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You can use goodrx to get generic version (Dr must write epinephrine pen auto injector instead of EPIPEN) and the price varies from $141.47 and up at different Pharmacies.

Use Canadadrugs.com. You should be able to get a equivalent version for ~$100 for one pen. The 2 packs are a waste and the expiry is less than 1 year generally. You will need to send a copy of the prescription to them and it will take a few weeks to get your pen since it is an international delivery.

It is illegal to sell epipens or any prescription medication. The generic one mentioned prior is a less expensive option, though it was discouraged by my young son's doctor and described as not as straight forward/easy to use. I have never seen it so I can't comment on that. If you go to the epipen website they do offer a discount card, and depending on your insurance coverage it will pay for or discount the cost. Due to a high deductible I still end up paying $200 for the pen set. The pen buys you about 15 minutes of time. The second pen is in case EMS does not respond within the 15 minutes; in case there is a problem with the initial administration of the medication; or in case you are more than 15 minutes from your nearest hospital.

Epipen website: https://www.epipen.com/en/hcp/about-epipen/help-your-patients-sa...

Why does the government allow such an essential product that was invented in the 70s to be priced so high? The actual epinephrine costs only about 1 dollar.
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-09-23/how-marketing-...

The price has also been increased significantly in the last year. The following is from Wikipedia: "An autoinjector for anaphylaxis, as of 2015 in the United States, costs about 100 USD.[23] In 2016 this increased to about 600 USD.[24]"

I was told by multiple Epipen company salespeople that it can be used past the expiry date as long as the fluid is clear and not cloudy or discolored.

Unfortunately, an Epipen is something you use to save your life.  I have heard of people dying even with a nonexpired Epipen.  I would think twice before relying on an expired Epipen.  Maybe if you are sitting in the emergency room waiting to be seen you may want to risk your life on an outdated Epipen.  Otherwise, I would think twice.  

Also, recommendations from allergists are that if you use an Epipen for anaphylaxis, it should be follow-up by a trip to the emergency room for possible further treatment and cardiac monitoring for a few hours.  It's really unfair that drugs some people depend on suddenly increase in price.  Sometimes the reason is greed, but not always.

As someone mentioned above, you can opt for an epinephrine shot instead. epinephrine is generic and low cost, epipen is simply a company that put epinephrine in an easy to use pen sized applicator. Hopefully epipens greed will quickly get other companies to create their own applicator.

The problem with the shot is that the individual usually needs it instantly and doesn't have time to drive 10-15 minutes to an ER. Drug companies can sometimes renew their patents which drives the price back up. The same is true for Albuterol. I was paying $7 for it in 2007, and now it's $75. For what it's worth, I was also told by an allergist that an epipen can be used after the expiry date so long as the fluid remains clear.

jeffmd said:   As someone mentioned above, you can opt for an epinephrine shot instead. epinephrine is generic and low cost, epipen is simply a company that put epinephrine in an easy to use pen sized applicator. Hopefully epipens greed will quickly get other companies to create their own applicator.
  The CEO of the company that makes epipen is the daughter of a senator and has strong DC connections.  I'm sure this has some influence on the FDA rejecting a rival generic device created by Teva.  They hoped that the device would be approved in 2012, but now it will be 2017 or beyond before it gets approved.

Don't buy anyone's pen on eBay etc. -- there are lots of unscrupulous people out there, and unregulated factories in other countries making fakes of many things, and you wouldn't know what it was filled with.

If you haven't already done so, call every pharmacy in your local area --
I called about 15 different pharmacies in my area a couple of years ago about a medication, and I found that one pharmacy was selling it at half the price ($25 a month) of another ($50 a month) [the other pharmacies were at random price points in-between].
For a different medication, one pharmacy was selling it at $125 for a 24-day supply and another pharmacy in town was selling the same amount for $80.

You could try the generic, after researching how tricky to use, for adult patients, that it might be.

Probably smart to have 2 pens at a time, in case the first one malfunctions, or isn't injected properly due to stress/nerves, or you are more than 15 minutes away from professional help (which, obviously, is a common circumstance).

Another resource is Good Rx. It will ask your location and give you some prices for local sources. Also, in most states Costco will allow non members to purchase prescription things at member prices.

And this resource: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card


Program Name: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card
Provider: Mylan
Phone Number: 1-800-395-3376
Website: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/
How do I get the discount? Register online to download and print a card.
How much can I save? Your co-pay can be reduced to as little as $0 per fill, with a maximum savings of $100 per 2-Pak.
Do I need insurance? Yes. The program is for commercially insured patients only.
Number of uses: Unlimited.
Expiration: 12/31/16
Other notes: There is a limit of three 2-Paks per prescription.

vadeltachi said:   And this resource: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/
Program Name: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card
Provider: Mylan
Phone Number: 1-800-395-3376
Website: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/
How do I get the discount? Register online to download and print a card.
How much can I save? Your co-pay can be reduced to as little as $0 per fill, with a maximum savings of $100 per 2-Pak.
Do I need insurance? Yes. The program is for commercially insured patients only.
Number of uses: Unlimited.
Expiration: 12/31/16
Other notes: There is a limit of three 2-Paks per prescription.
 

  The OP mentioned in the OP that he/she has already checked into the $0 Epi-pen co-pay card, and still was going to be charged $530 for the medication after applying the Epi-pen offer.

One more option if available to you: Kaiser Permanente offers HDHP HSA plans with $100 deductibles and $5 prescription copays. Plans can be purchased through the exchanges or from KP directly. Kaiser-Permanente

oppidum said:   
vadeltachi said:   And this resource: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/ 
Program Name: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card
Provider: Mylan
Phone Number: 1-800-395-3376
Website: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/ 
How do I get the discount? Register online to download and print a card.
How much can I save? Your co-pay can be reduced to as little as $0 per fill, with a maximum savings of $100 per 2-Pak.
Do I need insurance? Yes. The program is for commercially insured patients only.
Number of uses: Unlimited.
Expiration: 12/31/16
Other notes: There is a limit of three 2-Paks per prescription.

  The OP mentioned in the OP that he/she has already checked into the $0 Epi-pen co-pay card, and still was going to be charged $530 for the medication after applying the Epi-pen offer.

  I sure didn't see the word card used. In any case, this resource may be of interest to others seeing this post.

If you live in a pro-benefits blue state and willing to play the income numbers game and jump through a couple of hoops, prescribed Epipens are free including $0 copay.

I wish the places that give them out also would take them back after expiration to recycle.  The system has waste.

I saw someone online complaining about how much epipens have gone up. There's a knock off called Adrenaclick that's cheaper but I think it's not quite as easy to use. It's suppose to be much cheaper though.

vadeltachi said:   
oppidum said:   
vadeltachi said:   And this resource: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/ 
Program Name: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card

  The OP mentioned in the OP that he/she has already checked into the $0 Epi-pen co-pay card, and still was going to be charged $530 for the medication after applying the Epi-pen offer.

  I sure didn't see the word card used. In any case, this resource may be of interest to others seeing this post.

He/she didn't use the word "card", but I assumed this was indicating the same thing: 
InFlamed said:   the "$0 copay" offer through epipen
 

https://www.epipen.com/copay-offer/
i have used this card before and saved money on epicene. If your check prices though there are vast differences between stores. Always make sure epicenter is good for at least a year .

oppidum said:   
vadeltachi said:   
oppidum said:   
vadeltachi said:   And this resource: https://www.activatethecard.com/epipen/ 
Program Name: EpiPen $0 Co-Pay Card

  The OP mentioned in the OP that he/she has already checked into the $0 Epi-pen co-pay card, and still was going to be charged $530 for the medication after applying the Epi-pen offer.

  I sure didn't see the word card used. In any case, this resource may be of interest to others seeing this post.

He/she didn't use the word "card", but I assumed this was indicating the same thing: 
InFlamed said:   the "$0 copay" offer through epipen

You assumed; I didn't.  More to the point, how to get the card for those who may find it of value is the point

Adrenaclick is another company's auto injector of epinephrine. It also offers a "coupon" to reduce your copay. The first question for the op is what is on your insurance formulary? That should be your best copay option when used in conjunction with company's coupon, card, whatever. For insight into the tremendous increase in price you might find the following article of interest. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-09-23/how-marketing-...
Unfortunately, this type of pricing is happening to pharmaceuticals on a daily basis and we the patients as the end consumers are paying the price.

thanks!  they said they will reimburse my copay from last month

Thanks for the reminder to refill my prescription...the copay for my Epipen Rx is $100 through Aetna, so it's free after copay assistance.

OP, what did you end up doing? Did you find it for less?


Just forgo Epipen completely and go "generic."  Epinephrine is epinephrine.  Epipen's epinephrine is no different than the "generic" version.  The only difference is the delivery system which prevents your Epipen RX from being filled generic.  You need a new Rx for Adrenaclick to get the generic below.

http://www.epinephrineautoinject.com/ 

They also have a $100 co pay offer
https://sservices.trialcard.com/Coupon/Epinephrine 

It's currently under $200 with goodrx if you forgo insurance completely.

Your pharmacy may not usually carry it but they should be able to order it by giving them the appropriate NDC code.  Both Walgreens and CVS was able to obtain it for next day.

I need three for my child (school, after school, home).  On HDHP, it is close to $600 per box x 3 for Epipen where the desired outcome at expiration is throwing it in the trash.  Throwing away 3 boxes @ $200/box for the generic injector is better than throwing away 3 boxes @ $600/box for EpiPen.

Mylan is definitely pushing the limits on pricing.  6 years ago, Epipen was about $250-$300 without insurance.

If I wasn't so disgusted with Mylan, I would have brought their stock.

I was reading the Consumerist site a minute ago (I had followed a Deal Discussion link there to read about Target's "Egyptian cotton" bedsheets refund program) and the newest article on that site was on the Epipen pricing issue -- explaining how the pharma company's CEO who has driven up the Epipen price is the daughter of a senator, and how she apparently knew that some officials at her former university had falsified her transcript to show that she'd graduated with an MBA, when apparently she hadn't. The university officials had to resign over the deception, but she kept her pharma job. https://consumerist.com/2016/08/24/6-things-you-should-know-abou...

The Epipen manufacturer is quickly rolling out their own "generic":

From an article published on August 29th:

"...drugmaker Mylan today announced it will introduce a generic version of the epinephrine auto-injector for half the current sticker price of the name-brand drug.

According to Mylan, the generic epinephrine shot will be listed at $300 for a pack of two. That’s still three times what the drug cost only eight years ago.

The generic will be identical in every way to EpiPen, says Mylan, and will be sold in two strengths (.15 mg and .30 mg) when it hits pharmacies within “several weeks.”

Rather than just slash the price on EpiPen, Mylan will sell both the generic and the name-brand version (for people who want to pay twice the price, apparently)."

https://consumerist.com/2016/08/29/mylan-to-sell-generic-epipen-...

They have also expanded their "savings card" program -- details are in the linked article below.

One thing I saw was that patients earning up to 4 times the "poverty level" income can get the Epipen for FREE (if I'm reading that right).

Also, for people who do have to pay full price, apparently there is a discount program that takes 1/2 off to make it $300 instead of $600.

https://consumerist.com/2016/08/25/under-fire-over-epipen-price-hike-mylan-expands-savings-card-program/

Mylan CEO defends drastic rise in cost of life-saving EpiPens to angry lawmakers

[Her salary was 18 million dollars last year]

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3799698/Mylan-CEO-set-de... 

"Outraged Republican and Democratic lawmakers on Wednesday grilled the head of pharmaceutical company Mylan about the significant cost increase of its life-saving EpiPens and the profits for a company with sales in excess of $11 billion.

Defending the company's business practices, Mylan CEO Heather Bresch told the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee that she wishes the company had 'better anticipated the magnitude and acceleration' of the rising prices for some families.

'We never intended this,' Bresch said, but maintained that her company doesn't make much profit from each emergency allergy shot.

The list price of EpiPens has grown to $608 for a two-pack, an increase of more than 500 percent since 2007.

Families who rely on multiple EpiPens to respond when their children have allergic reactions, whether at home or at sporting events, have lashed out at Mylan in growing public outcry.

House Oversight Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, said high executive pay at Mylan 'doesn't add up for a lot of people' as the EpiPen price has increased.

Chaffetz said executives for the company made $300 million over five years while the list price for a pair of the emergency allergy shots rose.

'Parents don't have a choice,' Chaffetz said. 'If your loved one needs this, it better darn well be in your backpack.'

Bresch, who displayed an EpiPen, said the company makes only $50 in profit on each EpiPen. But Chaffetz said he finds that 'a little hard to believe.'

The soft-spoken CEO patiently listened to criticism after criticism from lawmakers of both parties, but found no sympathy in the room.

In response to one question, Bresch acknowledged that she made $18 million in salary last year. 'Sounds like you're doing pretty well on this,' said Rep. John Mica, R-Fla.

When asked if she understood what the furor was about, she argued that the complexity of drug pricing is partially to blame. 'I truly believe the story got ahead of the facts,' Bresch said.

EpiPens are used in emergencies to stop anaphylaxis, the potentially fatal allergic reactions to insect bites and stings and foods like nuts and eggs.

People usually keep multiple EpiPens Handy at home, school or work, but the syringes, prefilled with the hormone epinephrine, expire after a year.

The company says it has made strides to more widely distribute the drug to schools and others and raised awareness of deadly allergies. That requires investment, Bresch said.

The Mylan executive has some familiarity with Capitol Hill — she is the daughter of Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va. But lawmakers so far haven't given any deference to her, and several other committees have called for investigations into the price increase.

Bresch noted that Mylan has said it will begin selling its generic version for $300 for a pair. That will still bring Mylan tens of millions of dollars in revenue while helping retain market share against current and future brand-name and generic competition.

Chaffetz said he was skeptical that the company will lose any money on the generic versions. 'This is why we don't believe you,' he said.

The company has also offered coupon cards and has doubled the limit for eligibility for its patient assistance program. But critics have said the coupons, discount cards and patient assistance programs aren't real solutions because many customers won't use them or won't qualify for them.

Republican Rep. Scott DesJarlais of Tennessee, a physician, told Bresch that she was 'trying to make us feel good' about the generic version and other programs, but that he doesn't feel good about it.

'A mother would cut off her right arm to get that drug. You chose to charge her $600 instead of cutting off her arm,' DesJarlais said. 'Lower the price so they can afford it.'

Last year, more than 3.6 million U.S. prescriptions for two-packs of EpiPens were filled, according to data firm IMS Health. That brought in sales of nearly $1.7 billion for Mylan, though the company says it only receives about $1.1 billion after rebates and fees paid to insurers, distributors and other health care businesses.

In the Senate, leaders of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs' investigations subcommittee said earlier this month that they have begun an inquiry into the company's pricing and competition practices. The Aging Committee requested briefings on the issue, and Iowa Sen. Chuck Grassley, the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, has written several letters to Mylan demanding answers."



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