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from:  https://consumerist.com/2016/08/12/some-editions-of-the-first-ha...

"You might want to take a close look at that hardcover copy of the first Harry Potter book, as some versions contain an error that makes them super rare, and pretty darn valuable.

There are about 500 first edition copies of Harry Potter and The Philosopher’s Stone (in U.S. editions, the boy wizard was paired with The Sorcerer’s Stone) that have the mistake: “1 wand” appears twice in Harry’s list of required supplies for Hogwarts on page 53.

There’s a copy of the 1997 book going up for sale in a November auction which is expected to sell for as much as £26,000 (about $33,600), as it’s in “excellent condition,” Matthew Haley, Bonhams’ Head of Books and Manuscripts, said in a press release...."

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I have an original Goblet of fire where James comes out after Lily which she corrected after first printing
How much is that worth.

And why list a super rare British novel on a USA website?

Gonna do this after I check all my coins for errors, dig for gold in the back yard, check the attic for mint condition 100 year old baseball cards, and spend my paycheck on powerball tickets.

forbin4040 said:   I have an original Goblet of fire where James comes out after Lily which she corrected after first printing
How much is that worth.

And why list a super rare British novel on a USA website?

I am not into the Harry Potter thing, in the slightest, myself, so I am blissfully unaware of what you are referring to about goblets of fire, Lily, etc.

I didn't realize that a novel that sold millions of copies worldwide could be "super rare".
The way people travel in modern times, and the way books are sold, shipped, traded, and moved all over the world, anyone anywhere in the world could have a copy of the 1997 first edition of this book....  one would think. 
I for one have many books that I bought in the UK which are with me in the US, and I've also sold many (as used books) to people resident in the US via Amazon. com.  And when I lived in the UK, I sold via Amazon. co.uk hundreds of the books that I had previously bought in the US.  Plus I buy books from bookstores in the UK and continental Europe and have them shipped here... there are so many ways that books can cross national borders.
Not to mention the British readers (now resident in the US) who read Fatwallet, such as the folks who have commented on the Brexit thread and my BBC recipe website thread and my BBC i-player thread...
there might be more Brits than we think amongst us 'septics' here, since they seem to mainly lurk (they have the right idea!) 

Consumer Reports' American website consumerist.com thought it was worthwhile to publish the article about this book which I quoted here, and I thought it was worthwhile to spend a moment to spread the story via this hardly-busy subforum of Fatwallet.  It could possibly lead to someone coming into a $30,000 windfall that they desperately need.  Stranger things have happened.

wvtalbot said:   Gonna do this after I check all my coins for errors, dig for gold in the back yard, check the attic for mint condition 100 year old baseball cards, and spend my paycheck on powerball tickets.
If a person knows that he/she owns a 1997 hardback copy of the first Harry Potter novel, how time-consuming would it be to check one page for one line of text, in order to possibly make $30,000 from it? 
It would probably him/her take less time than it took you to think up all those exaggerated examples in your comment.
 

oppidum said:   
wvtalbot said:   Gonna do this after I check all my coins for errors, dig for gold in the back yard, check the attic for mint condition 100 year old baseball cards, and spend my paycheck on powerball tickets.
If a person knows that he/she owns a 1997 hardback copy of the first Harry Potter novel, how time-consuming would it be to check one page for one line of text, in order to possibly make $30,000 from it? 
It would probably him/her take less time than it took you to think up all those exaggerated examples in your comment.

  

Because there were only 500 of these printed, 300 went to libraries, it was only published in London and 98% of them are accounted for.  This is a fluff peice to attract the attention of idiots.  It worked.  

wvtalbot said:   
oppidum said:   
wvtalbot said:   Gonna do this after I check all my coins for errors, dig for gold in the back yard, check the attic for mint condition 100 year old baseball cards, and spend my paycheck on powerball tickets.
If a person knows that he/she owns a 1997 hardback copy of the first Harry Potter novel, how time-consuming would it be to check one page for one line of text, in order to possibly make $30,000 from it? 
It would probably him/her take less time than it took you to think up all those exaggerated examples in your comment.

  

Because there were only 500 of these printed, 300 went to libraries, it was only published in London and 98% of them are accounted for.  This is a fluff peice to attract the attention of idiots.  It worked.  

  Suboptimal to refer to your compatriots as "idiots".

There's nothing wrong with what you posted, OP. It takes seconds to check the book for the error. It takes much longer to find and check coins for errors or digging for gold in the backyard, etc. It also has a much higher chance of paying off than digging for gold in the backyard or playing the lottery. It it's free, unlike the lottery.  And you'd already know if you have mint 100 year old baseball cards or not.

wvtalbot said:   
oppidum said:   
wvtalbot said:   Gonna do this after I check all my coins for errors, dig for gold in the back yard, check the attic for mint condition 100 year old baseball cards, and spend my paycheck on powerball tickets.
If a person knows that he/she owns a 1997 hardback copy of the first Harry Potter novel, how time-consuming would it be to check one page for one line of text, in order to possibly make $30,000 from it? 
It would probably him/her take less time than it took you to think up all those exaggerated examples in your comment.

  

Because there were only 500 of these printed, 300 went to libraries, it was only published in London and 98% of them are accounted for.  This is a fluff peice to attract the attention of idiots.  It worked.  

  What's a fluff peice?

Ralph Waldo Emerson said:“Life is a journey, not a destination.”
  If you were given a free lotto ticket would you throw it away or would you check the numbers?    I think of it this way.  The people with the hardcover copy have a free lottery ticket with odds of winning being substantially higher then playing the actual lotto.  I could have made more money doing something else then I have saved perusing these forums and responding.  There is a thrill in the chase.  People here do way more to save a buck then reading one sentence out of a book. 

To quote another smart man:
giqcass said:   Fatwallet is not a website but a way of life!

 


 

Time to rummage about some second hand bookstores.

Actually you probably have a higher chance of hitting the lottery.  

500 books produced.  All in London.  300 were given to libraries.  The vast majority of the others are accounted for.  Very very few crossed the pond and those that did were taken by people who knew exactly what they were. 

My guess is maybe one or two are out there to be found, and they are still in the UK.  So, good luck with that. 
 



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