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So we recently moved to Tulsa from Chicago (both city proper), and despite anecdotes to the contrary, we find that the cost of living for most things is actually higher in Tulsa than in Chicago.
Land/realty and gas are definitely cheaper here, but insurance (both auto and home), utility rates, and groceries appear more expensive.  In particular meat and dairy are significantly higher prices.

In any event, we have a "discount" grocery store just down the street from us that so far has had the best prices on meat and decent produce as well.
I do most of grocery shopping here at Target/WalMart/Sam's/Costco, but for meat, or something I just need to run out quick for I have been going to this discount place.
Well, last week the owners of this chain renovated and renamed the store (they have done this with a few of theirs) and apparently they have changed their pricing model to something known as "cost plus pricing" which I haven't really been familiar with before.

My wife ran out to buy some chocolate chips and they were marked $2 on the shelf, but when she went to check out they were marked up 10% to $2.20 and she was directed to a sign at the front of the store that outlined this practice.  She was (rightfully) a bit outraged (because we both feel this is a stupid tactic) - even though in reality the price was probably the same she would have paid here previously.  When she told me about this I looked it up and found this article describing what this chain is doing:

http://www.tulsaworld.com/business/consumer/three-warehouse-mark...

The article states:
article said: The cost-plus strategy will mean that shoppers at the three stores will see the cost the store paid for the goods on the price tag. A 10 percent markup will then be added at the register.
....
Cox sees his stores competing mostly with Wal-Mart for what he calls “discount-seekers.”
...
According to experts, advantages of cost-plus pricing are that it’s easy for business owners to calculate profits and it’s easier to justify price increases. However, on the flip side, the business may be leaving some margin of profit on the table because customers may be willing to pay more than the markup.


I just don't get any of this.  Firstly - I would hardly call this store a "discount store" regardless of what they want to call themselves.  They are a small chain grocery - but their overall prices are higher than the equivalent at WalMart Market (one of the bigger groceries out here).  The larger grocery chain proper out here is definitely pricier, but I'm not sure being cheaper than your one biggest competitor makes you "discount"

More importantly though, I don't understand how cost plus pricing makes it easier for the owners to "calculate profits."  This strategy would just seem to piss people off - as it did my wife.

I doubt the store paid $2.00 for their bag of chocolate chips - if they did, they clearly should be out of business.  They probably paid $1.30 or something (if that) - so this seems to be false advertising.  But even if they did pay $2.00 and want to sell it to the customer for 10% more, why can't the signs on the products state the actual selling price and then, if the customer wants to know how much the store (says they) paid, they can subtract 10%.

In the end, does any customer really care what the store paid?  They just want to know what they are paying - so why display prices that are otherwise.

Can anyone make any sense out of this - or the real reasons stores do it, and if there is really any benefit at all to the consumer?

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the inorganic milk has much more flavor.   Doesn't come from cows, plants, etc., in fact its non-carbon based.  Yummy!!

Mickie3 (Nov. 03, 2016 @ 6:44p) |

Wow - shipping really does kill the deal.

Edit to add:  This is the price we pay where people outnumber cows.

dcwilbur (Nov. 04, 2016 @ 12:31p) |

How is this in anyway legal? It's no different than bait and switch or false advertisement. When I see an item and a sig... (more)

justignoredem (Nov. 04, 2016 @ 2:57p) |

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I haven't ever seen that at a store. Seems like a pretty annoying policy. On the other hand its not too hard to add 10% to the prices.

If its truely their actual cost + 10% then you should be able to find items there that are cheaper. Maybe this isn't as true for grocery stores but usually merchants have some high margin items. At that store those items would not be high margin and likely cheaper than elsewhere.

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BenH said:     But even if they did pay $2.00 and want to sell it to the customer for 10% more, why can't the signs on the products state the actual selling price and then, if the customer wants to know how much the store (says they) paid, they can subtract 10%.
 

  
Well, for one, because that's not how math works. $2.20 - 2.20*0.10 = $1.98.

But I can see why you'd be frustrated by the store's tactics. If it's a problem, shop somewhere else.

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10% actually seems kind of low if that store is really only charging customers what the products cost them. Kroger made 26.6 billion in revenue and had 5.9 billion in gross profit last quarter. This means they had a 22% gross profit margin, which is much higher than the 10% gross profit margin this store is claiming to make. 

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I didn't ready the article you linked to, but cost plus pricing can be deceptive. The reason is that costs can be calculated in many different ways. I highly doubt they paid $2 for a bag of chips, but most likely they are considering their overhead, labor, advertising, administrative expenses, delivery, etc...  when considering what the item actually cost. They could even go so far as to factor in the costs of dealing with potential returns as part of the cost. All of this is accomplished via allocations.

I hope that gives you a little more insight into what's really going on. If you want an in-depth example, I can provide one. However, I'm going to assume this is enough.
~Ryan

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We have this in florida also. Its mostly competition for those other than w@lmart. You would be surprised at how many people think its "below" them to shop at w@lmart. Seems that the 10% stores usually take up residence in older piggly wiggly and tier 2 stores. I would imagine some people could relate to the 10% tithe concept.

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busyryan said:   I didn't ready the article you linked to, but cost plus pricing can be deceptive. The reason is that costs can be calculated in many different ways. I highly doubt they paid $2 for a bag of chips, but most likely they are considering their overhead, labor, advertising, administrative expenses, delivery, etc...  when considering what the item actually cost. They could even go so far as to factor in the costs of dealing with potential returns as part of the cost. All of this is accomplished via allocations.

I hope that gives you a little more insight into what's really going on. If you want an in-depth example, I can provide one. However, I'm going to assume this is enough.
~Ryan

  
Yes - this is likely true - that they factor in all costs related to the item.  Even then the margins seem small at 10%, meaning they are no doubt marking these prices up higher.  Otherwise they are basically saying they only make 10% margin on everything they sell - which likely isn't true.  They probably make 300% on some things and 1% on others.

What I'm still most confused about is the statement from the article:

"easy for business owners to calculate profits and it’s easier to justify price increases"

I don't see how it is easier for the owners just because the prices on the shelf reflect what they paid.  Let's say a $1 item ($1.10 to the customer) increases 50% in cost.  The display will now say $1.50 and you will actually pay $1.65 - so either way, how its marked or what you pay is still a price increase - I don't see how it hides anything other than to fool customers stupid enough to be fooled by a sign that says $10 when they have to actually pay $11 (even though they know it's 10% more they just don't do the math in their head).

So, what I'm getting at in the end here - is there truly a benefit for the business other than trying to "fool people" - it can't actually make any difference on the back end whether I display my prices at customer's cost, or 10% less and then mark it at the register.

I guess I'm saying it just seems shady - and unless someone can give me a valid reason, I guess I will consider to think so.

thx.
 

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BenH said:   But even if they did pay $2.00 and want to sell it to the customer for 10% more, why can't the signs on the products state the actual selling price and then,
 

  
The store's practice of adding a fee on top of the offered price is odd at the very least and would certainly violate consumer protection laws in at least some states. Perhaps a complaint to the state AG would be in order.

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castaline said:   We have this in florida also. Its mostly competition for those other than w@lmart. You would be surprised at how many people think its "below" them to shop at w@lmart. Seems that the 10% stores usually take up residence in older piggly wiggly and tier 2 stores. I would imagine some people could relate to the 10% tithe concept.
  
Its not "below me" -- I just don't like their business practices/model and want to make sure they always have a competitor.  Their markets don't really have a great selection either.  FWIW that cost plus model is how Sam's started.  It is also the system that was used in military commissaries, although that was changed due to competition issues in many domestic bases.  I tend to shop a wide variety of stores, from Asian and Hispanic markets to Whole Foods and BJs/Costco, plus the usual Aldi/Kroger/ect...  Protip, find a Hispanic/Latino serving meat market for good but cheap meat.  



I have found NC is fairly cheap other than health insurance options.  (not that I am staying, just on a contract)  Food isn't more expensive than Dallas, vehicle insurance is cheaper, vehicle registration is a little bit more due to personal property tax on the one vehicle I have local tags on.  Power is MUCH more expensive though, since Texas is deregulated in my area.  Rents are a bit higher (in Charlotte) than similar areas in Dallas, or so it seems.

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Its just another gimmick.  Just like 80% off jewelry at your local Mall Zales or Jared Jewelers.  If you don't like their prices, shop somewhere else
 

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RedWolfe01 said:   
FWIW that cost plus model is how Sam's started.  It is also the system that was used in military commissaries,...


What I'm interested in here is does a "cost plus" model necessarily mean that they display prices lower than what they charge at the register?

Or, does it simply mean that all items are sold at a fixed margin above cost?

I have no problem with the latter, it is the former that just seems really a really strange way to do business to me.
  

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RedWolfe01 said:   castaline said:   We have this in florida also. Its mostly competition for those other than w@lmart. You would be surprised at how many people think its "below" them to shop at w@lmart. Seems that the 10% stores usually take up residence in older piggly wiggly and tier 2 stores. I would imagine some people could relate to the 10% tithe concept.
  
Its not "below me" -- I just don't like their business practices/model and want to make sure they always have a competitor.  

Well when yoi boil it down, it's basically capitalism and economy of scale. it's not like they're forcing anyone out of business

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BenH said:   
busyryan said:   I didn't ready the article you linked to, but cost plus pricing can be deceptive. The reason is that costs can be calculated in many different ways. I highly doubt they paid $2 for a bag of chips, but most likely they are considering their overhead, labor, advertising, administrative expenses, delivery, etc...  when considering what the item actually cost. They could even go so far as to factor in the costs of dealing with potential returns as part of the cost. All of this is accomplished via allocations.

I hope that gives you a little more insight into what's really going on. If you want an in-depth example, I can provide one. However, I'm going to assume this is enough.
~Ryan

  
Yes - this is likely true - that they factor in all costs related to the item.  Even then the margins seem small at 10%, meaning they are no doubt marking these prices up higher.  Otherwise they are basically saying they only make 10% margin on everything they sell - which likely isn't true.  They probably make 300% on some things and 1% on others.

What I'm still most confused about is the statement from the article:

"easy for business owners to calculate profits and it’s easier to justify price increases"

I don't see how it is easier for the owners just because the prices on the shelf reflect what they paid.  Let's say a $1 item ($1.10 to the customer) increases 50% in cost.  The display will now say $1.50 and you will actually pay $1.65 - so either way, how its marked or what you pay is still a price increase - I don't see how it hides anything other than to fool customers stupid enough to be fooled by a sign that says $10 when they have to actually pay $11 (even though they know it's 10% more they just don't do the math in their head).

So, what I'm getting at in the end here - is there truly a benefit for the business other than trying to "fool people" - it can't actually make any difference on the back end whether I display my prices at customer's cost, or 10% less and then mark it at the register.

I guess I'm saying it just seems shady - and unless someone can give me a valid reason, I guess I will consider to think so.

thx.

  
Actually 10% isn't that bad for a grocery store - it is a low margin but high volume business.  They may have overhead hidden in their "cost" but I doubt it.  That is why so many grocery stores fail though, with a low margin they HAVE to have a certain volume to make costs. 

I would not be surprised if they looked at the total numbers and 10% or less was their average retail margin anyway.  The real issue is that it gets tricky to keep up with promotional price changes from suppliers on a per-shipment basis.  Particularly on things like chips and soda that are constantly in flux.

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I've seen this practice used in rural areas of East Coast states (PA and VA in particular) as "grocery outlets" but not in a metro area like Tulsa.

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BenH said:   In the end, does any customer really care what the store paid?  They just want to know what they are paying - so why display prices that are otherwise.
 

Don't know about grocery shoppers, but everybody here seems to want to know what a dealer paid for a car they are selling.

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We have a couple of those type of stores where we live in SW Missouri. Their "cost" is the price it takes to deliver the item to the shelf-- product cost, labor, overhead, etc... Then they tack a flat 10% on to your total when you checkout. I have not been in one in a long time. I figure it all comes out in the end and they're just targeting the people who think they are getting a deal. Just a big game of mind tricks...

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Avalon, one thing you aren't accounting for is the profit from the pharmacy that most Kroger's have but pure procedure stores lack.

At Wal-Mart pharmacies add about 20% of the total store profit and have some of the highest margin items in the store. Generic zyrtec was 96% margin. Even basic peroxide was 50%.

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BenH said:   
busyryan said:   I didn't ready the article you linked to, but cost plus pricing can be deceptive. The reason is that costs can be calculated in many different ways. I highly doubt they paid $2 for a bag of chips, but most likely they are considering their overhead, labor, advertising, administrative expenses, delivery, etc...  when considering what the item actually cost. They could even go so far as to factor in the costs of dealing with potential returns as part of the cost. All of this is accomplished via allocations.

I hope that gives you a little more insight into what's really going on. If you want an in-depth example, I can provide one. However, I'm going to assume this is enough.
~Ryan

  
Yes - this is likely true - that they factor in all costs related to the item.  Even then the margins seem small at 10%, meaning they are no doubt marking these prices up higher.  Otherwise they are basically saying they only make 10% margin on everything they sell - which likely isn't true.  They probably make 300% on some things and 1% on others.

What I'm still most confused about is the statement from the article:

"easy for business owners to calculate profits and it’s easier to justify price increases"

I don't see how it is easier for the owners just because the prices on the shelf reflect what they paid.  Let's say a $1 item ($1.10 to the customer) increases 50% in cost.  The display will now say $1.50 and you will actually pay $1.65 - so either way, how its marked or what you pay is still a price increase - I don't see how it hides anything other than to fool customers stupid enough to be fooled by a sign that says $10 when they have to actually pay $11 (even though they know it's 10% more they just don't do the math in their head).

So, what I'm getting at in the end here - is there truly a benefit for the business other than trying to "fool people" - it can't actually make any difference on the back end whether I display my prices at customer's cost, or 10% less and then mark it at the register.

I guess I'm saying it just seems shady - and unless someone can give me a valid reason, I guess I will consider to think so.

thx.

  
If the "cost" includes everything (overhead, labor, etc), then it is indeed easier to calculate profit - it's 10% of the total sale. It's also easier to explain any increase to the customers by saying it's due to things outside of their control (e.g. higher fuel cost) rather than greed.

In the end it's just a mind trick designed to make customers feel they're supporting an honest business that's making a small profit of 10% for providing the service.

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I wonder what the resolution is on their overhead costs? I would expect a higher overhead with perishables, heavier and larger items, when compared to Boxed items located in the center of the store. I am sure the overhead baked into each item is not to the exact resolution of that item; in fact, I bet they have one or two fixed overhead cost factors they pass onto the price of the good being purchased - and I bet it's a value or factor that favors the store, not the consumer. This is how I would increase profits if I owned such a store, then I'd give everything a +10% at the register to make people think we're an honest company.

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You mean the real price on everything is 10% higher than the price it's marked with?

Well, that sucks. (he says as he walks out of the store, leaving behind a full cart)

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Consumerist story about this from 2008.

https://consumerist.com/2008/10/10/supermarket-chain-adds-10-at-register-but-only-in-some-stores/

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In the Atlanta area, there is chain of stores called "Food Depot" that follows this pricing model. Maybe consumers are so used to % in price tags subconsciously being associated with discounts, that most consumers won't realize the % is actually a markup till they get home and review the receipt? In any case, I have found shelf prices at Food Depot to be higher than other stores (and on top you pay a 10% markup).

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Having lived in various parts of the country: TN, WV, OK, San Francisco and Los Angeles. LA has the cheapest food prices if you are go to Mexican markets.  Chinese food is cheapest and easily the best tasting in LA than all those places mentioned. I am not sure Chinese food taste in NY. Housing price is expensive but I guess you can turn it in your favor. Each year the housing price in LA in good areas go up $100K a year. Property investors, fix flippers are making killings. 

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ach1199 said:   Consumerist story about this from 2008.

https://consumerist.com/2008/10/10/supermarket-chain-adds-10-at-...
 

  
We only do this in stores with price sensitive clientele, in order to fool them into thinking our prices are cheaper than they actually are...

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We have a few of these in my area (Louisville) that are former Winn-Dixie stores, from when they left our market (along with leaving behind probably 20-30 vacant stores) about 10 years ago. Most got converted to this, Save-a-Lot, or one of those "daily flea market" stores (I lucked out since the one near me was the one and only store in the city that was a more modern one, and the store was in good enough shape and did good enough business that Kroger actually ended up buying it and took over, which was an upgrade). Then again, many of the stores they left behind here are still vacant and deteriorating a decade later, so it's better than nothing.

Anyway, I do shop in there from time-to-time. It isn't a place I'd do all my regular daily grocery shopping, but some nice deals CAN be found at times, particularly on things like meat and produce. I've found packaged foods don't fare so well, although they do have some store-brands (usually the Best Choice ones, which can be found at all sorts of IGA stores) that are decent and reasonably priced. But for the most part, I'd avoid it unless they have something special that you like in their ad and you happen to be in the area.

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ach1199 said:   Consumerist story about this from 2008.

https://consumerist.com/2008/10/10/supermarket-chain-adds-10-at-...

  
Thanks - that clearly shows I'm not the only one who thinks this is strange.  It seems that the retailer, like quite a few responses in this thread also can't seem to answer the simple question that was posed here:
consumerist said: Question 9: Wouldn’t it be more honest/up front to just add 10 percent to the price of all of the products—so that people can see the actual price on the shelf and on the sticker?

Answer: The grocery industry is extremely competitive. Stores vie for customers. Customer loyalty is highly valued. Given the need to attract and retain customers, our stores cannot afford to alienate its customers by charging unexplained fees or unanticipated mark-ups. Our pricing is attracting customers—rather than losing them–demonstrating that the pricing policy is in fact fair, obvious, and well-understood by our shoppers.


?? How does that answer the question other than to state that you are attempting to attract customers by displaying a lower price on shelves and flyers to pull them in and then up charge 10%?
"Unexplained fees, unanticipated mark-ups" - that has nothing to do with stating $2.00 or $2.20 on the shelf.  Any additional cost that the retailer has will still increase that $2 bottom line in any event.

Whatever - between the input here and the articles mentioned it is clear that this is more of a marketing ploy Target at the uneducated more than anything else.  I think it is crappy, but alas it won't stop me from buying my meat there if they continue to have the best prices in the area (after the 10% markup).

Thanks again FWF
 

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Despite what the retailer wants you to think, this is NOT "cost plus," it's really "shelf price plus."  As mentioned earlier, it's a gimmick designed to compete w/ WM, Aldi, et al.  I would not expect it to be widely adopted.

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I live in Oklahoma as well, we just had one of these show up in my town (OKC Area). We just smile and go to Target /WalMart /other grocery. To much of a PIA to deal with pricing like this.

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taxmantoo said:   You mean the real price on everything is 10% higher than the price it's marked with?

Well, that sucks. (he says as he walks out of the store, leaving behind a full cart)

I wouldn't shop at a place like this on principle, I'm surprised enough people would put up with this to let the store stay in business.

Does the store have a circulating ad that says, Chocolate chips $2* (and then at the bottom adds *plus 10%)? 

I think I will try this the next time I bill a patient. I know I said that hour would cost $300, but that was just my cost. It'll be $330, please.

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Ridiculous gimmick, and it doesn't even reflect how grocers price goods anyway.  There are plenty of loss leaders in grocery stores to get you in the store - weekly meat and seafood specials, in-season produce sold at near zero margin, dairy and other quick-to-spoil items priced at lower margin than dry goods, etc., not to mention the amount of waste in produce, meat, bakery, etc., due to food that never gets sold.  Variability in utility and labor costs also factors in, as well as seasonality.  I can't see how all that could possibly be priced into every possible item on the shelves.

If this appeals to a consumer who thinks that the store makes a nice "honest" profit of 10%, then consumers should know that the typical margin at large grocery stores hovers right around 1%.  If these stores are making 10% profit, then the consumer can't possibly be getting a good deal.

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psychtobe said:   
I wouldn't shop at a place like this on principle, I'm surprised enough people would put up with this to let the store stay in business.

 


Well, we'll see how they do. Apparently the owner owns ~20 groceries in the greater area, and this is the 3rd or 4th converted over to the different name that uses this pricing.
I think if they advertise the 10% markup well enough, there isn't a problem with it - but obviously they didn't because my wife made it all the way to the register without realizing it.
If they can't make the most distracted and/or stupidest people (my wife may have been the former ) see what they are doing, then I don't think its clear enough.

That being said - if I can get the best meat prices there (and I'm talking more than pennies) I'll still shop. And, it is literally < 2 minute drive so it is probably still going to get some of my emergency business.
dcwilbur said:   Ridiculous gimmick, and it doesn't even reflect how grocers price goods anyway...

Yeah, well there are apparently a lot of strange pricing practices out here I've never seen before.

They price skim milk the cheapest and each additional % on top of that they charge like an extra 10-15 cents for.
So if skim is $2.89, then whole milk might be $3.25 (fixed). Sure, it takes more work to take the fat out of milk - but they are using that fat for creams, etc.
I've never lived anywhere else where milk was priced that way.

I've also lost all faith in those studies that determine cost of living by analyzing cost of grocery goods.
In Chicago (the city) I could buy whole milk for $2.50 at Target or across the street at the Supermarket - one of those places always had it for that price - sometimes even cheaper.
According to these articles, milk in Chicago is $3.35 - which is closer to what most places sell it for out here in Tulsa.
You can get it for closer to $2.80 at places like ALDI or maybe Target, but clearly there are more cows in Illinois.

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BenH said:   
 
They price skim milk the cheapest and each additional % on top of that they charge like an extra 10-15 cents for.
So if skim is $2.89, then whole milk might be $2.25. Sure, it takes more work to take the fat out of milk - but they are using that fat for creams, etc.
I've never lived anywhere else where milk was priced that way.

 

  typo?

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I wouldn't shop at a place like this on principle, I'm surprised enough people would put up with this to let the store stay in business.
Well mom and pop stores have marked up prices for the same product as well. How is this any different? Nobody is forcing you to shop there and sometimes it's more about convenience than the price.

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When I was in suburban Chicago not more than 6 months ago... Milk $1.34 at Aldi.

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I am assuming this is mostly a psychological ploy along the lines of pricing something $9.99 instead of $10.00 or displaying the 'Cash-only' price at a gas station. What people SEE is the lower price. Then they have to THINK about the real price. So initial reaction of the customer ( when most grocery purchase decisions are made ) is based on that lower price.

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kb2120 said:   I am assuming this is mostly a psychological ploy along the lines of pricing something $9.99 instead of $10.00 or displaying the 'Cash-only' price at a gas station. What people SEE is the lower price. Then they have to THINK about the real price. So initial reaction of the customer ( when most grocery purchase decisions are made ) is based on that lower price.
9.99 or cash only gas or requiring (free) reward card still end up with that price.

the surcharge means the actual price is higher.

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kb2120 said:   I am assuming this is mostly a psychological ploy along the lines of pricing something $9.99 instead of $10.00 or displaying the 'Cash-only' price at a gas station. What people SEE is the lower price. Then they have to THINK about the real price. So initial reaction of the customer ( when most grocery purchase decisions are made ) is based on that lower price.
  There's a gas station right near me that displays a sign with the "standard" 3 prices.  Except the prices listed, from top to bottom, are for Regular (when you buy a car wash), Regular, and Premium.  The Regular with car wash pricing is always cheaper than the gas station on the other corner, but the Regular price is always higher than the other gas station.  I can't even imagine how many people go in there, swipe their card, and pump a tank of gas at the higher Regular price without even noticing.

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cruisencode said:   
kb2120 said:   I am assuming this is mostly a psychological ploy along the lines of pricing something $9.99 instead of $10.00 or displaying the 'Cash-only' price at a gas station. What people SEE is the lower price. Then they have to THINK about the real price. So initial reaction of the customer ( when most grocery purchase decisions are made ) is based on that lower price.
  There's a gas station right near me that displays a sign with the "standard" 3 prices.  Except the prices listed, from top to bottom, are for Regular (when you buy a car wash), Regular, and Premium.  The Regular with car wash pricing is always cheaper than the gas station on the other corner, but the Regular price is always higher than the other gas station.  I can't even imagine how many people go in there, swipe their card, and pump a tank of gas at the higher Regular price without even noticing.

 well presumably they would be asked if they want carwash or not ?

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rufflesinc said:   
cruisencode said:   
kb2120 said:   I am assuming this is mostly a psychological ploy along the lines of pricing something $9.99 instead of $10.00 or displaying the 'Cash-only' price at a gas station. What people SEE is the lower price. Then they have to THINK about the real price. So initial reaction of the customer ( when most grocery purchase decisions are made ) is based on that lower price.
  There's a gas station right near me that displays a sign with the "standard" 3 prices.  Except the prices listed, from top to bottom, are for Regular (when you buy a car wash), Regular, and Premium.  The Regular with car wash pricing is always cheaper than the gas station on the other corner, but the Regular price is always higher than the other gas station.  I can't even imagine how many people go in there, swipe their card, and pump a tank of gas at the higher Regular price without even noticing.

 well presumably they would be asked if they want carwash or not ?

  This is true.  But if you don't read the sign carefully, you wouldn't know that you had to buy that car wash in order to get the cheaper gas price.

Skipping 44 Messages...
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How is this in anyway legal? It's no different than bait and switch or false advertisement. When I see an item and a sign below it with an amount - It can safely be assumed that that is the amount you (as the customer) are expected to pay to receive that item. Why not just make it something hard for people to calculate the total like 8.547420%? Where do you draw the line with this BS?

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