• filter:
  • Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
  • Search this Topic »
rated:

Member Summary
Final clearance sales will begin on Monday, January 9, and run for approximately eight to 12 weeks.Here's a list of the closures:

  • Greenwood, Bowling Green, KY (124,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 63 associates)
  • Carolina Place, Pineville, NC (151,000 square feet; opened in 1993; 69 associates)
  • Douglaston, Douglaston, NY (158,000 square feet; opened in 1981; 144 associates)
  • Downtown Portland, Portland, OR (246,000 square feet; opened in 2007; 85 associates)
  • Lancaster Mall, Salem, OR (67,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 53 associates)
  • Oakwood Mall, Eau Claire, WI (104,000 square feet; opened in 1991; 55 associates)
  • Mission Valley Apparel, San Diego, CA (385,000 square feet; opened in 1961; 140 associates)
  • Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, CA (141,000 square feet; opened in 1990; 77 associates)
  • Lakeland Square, Lakeland, FL (101,000 square feet; opened in 1995; 68 associates)
  • Oviedo Marketplace, Oviedo, FL (195,000 square feet; opened in 2000; 83 associates)
  • Sarasota Square, Sarasota, FL (143,000 square feet; opened in 1977; 86 associates)
  • University Square, Tampa, FL (140,000 square feet; opened in 1974; 73 associates)
  • CityPlace, West Palm Beach, FL (108,000 square feet; opened in 2000; 72 associates)
  • Georgia Square, Athens, GA (121,000 square feet; opened in 1981; 69 associates)
  • Nampa Gateway Center, Nampa, ID (104,000, square feet; opened in 2009; 57 associates)
  • Alton Square, Alton, IL (180,000 square feet; opened in 1978; 54 associates)
  • Stratford Square, Bloomingdale, IL (149,000 square feet; opened in 1981; 87 associates)
  • Eastland, Bloomington, IL (154,000 square feet; opened in 1999; 55 associates)
  • Jefferson, Louisville, KY (157,000 square feet; opened in 1979; 52 associates)
  • Esplanade, Kenner, LA (188,000 square feet; opened in 2008; 101 associates)
  • Bangor, Bangor, ME (143,000 square feet; opened in 1998; 65 associates)
  • Westgate, Brockton, MA (144,000 square feet; opened in 2003; 79 associates)
  • Silver City Galleria, Taunton, MA (152,000 square feet; opened in 1992; 82 associates)
  • Lakeview Square Mall, Battle Creek, MI (102,000 square feet: opened 1983; 51 associates)
  • Eastland Center, Harper Woods, MI (433,000 square feet; opened in 1957; 121 associates)
  • Lansing, Lansing, MI (103,000 square feet; opened in 1979; 57 associates)
  • Westland, Westland, MI (334,000 square feet; opened in 1965; 106 associates)
  • Minneapolis Downtown, Minneapolis, MN (1,276,000 square feet; opened in 1902; 280 associates)
  • Northgate, Durham, NC (187,000 square feet; opened in 1994; 72 associates)
  • Columbia, Grand Forks, ND (99,000 square feet; opened in 1978; 53 associates)
  • Moorestown, Moorestown, NJ (200,000 square feet; opened in 1999; 107 associates)
  • Voorhees Town Center, Voorhees, NJ (224,000 square feet; opened in 1970; 77 associates)
  • Preakness, Wayne, NJ (81,000 square feet; opened in 1963; 72 associates)
  • Cottonwood, Albuquerque, NM (173,000 square feet; opened in 1996; 56 associates)
  • Las Vegas Boulevard, Las Vegas, NV (178,000 square feet; opened in 1966; 84 associates)
  • Great Northern, Clay, NY (88,000 square feet; opened in 1989; 55 associates)
  • Oakdale Mall, Johnson City, NY (140,000 square feet; opened in 2000; 58 associates)
  • The Marketplace, Rochester, NY (149,000 square feet; opened in 1982; 77 associates)
  • Eastland, Columbus, OH (121,000 square feet; opened in 2006; 73 associates)
  • Sandusky, Sandusky, OH (133,000 square feet; opened in 1979; 61 associates)
  • Fort Steuben, Steubenville, OH (132,000 square feet; opened in 1974; 59 associates)
  • Promenade, Tulsa, OK (180,000 square feet; opened in 1996; 58 associates)
  • Neshaminy, Bensalem, PA (211,000 square feet; opened in 1968; 89 associates)
  • Shenango Valley, Hermitage, PA (106,000 square feet; opened in 1976; 69 associates)
  • Beaver Valley, Monaca, PA (203,000 square feet; opened in 1987; 78 associates)
  • Lycoming, Muncy, PA (120,000 square feet; opened in 1995; 61 associates)
  • Plymouth Meeting, Plymouth Meeting, PA (214,000 square feet; opened in 1966; 74 associates)
  • Washington Crown Center, Washington, PA (148,000 square feet; opened in 1999; 67 associates)
  • Parkdale, Beaumont, TX (171,000 square feet; opened in 2002; 67 associates)
  • Southwest Center, Dallas, TX (148,000 square feet; opened in 1975; 68 associates)
  • Sunland Park, El Paso, TX (105,000 square feet; opened in 2004; 71 associates)
  • Greenspoint, Houston, TX (314,000 square feet; opened in 1976; 70 associates)
  • West Oaks Mall, Houston, TX (244,000 square feet; opened in 1982; 135 associates)
  • Pasadena Town Square, Pasadena, TX (209,000 square feet; opened in 1962; 78 associates)
  • Collin Creek, Plano, TX (199,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 103 associates)
  • Broadway Square, Tyler, TX (100,000 square feet; opened in 1981; 65 associates)
  • Layton Hills, Layton, UT (162,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 72 associates)
  • Cottonwood, Salt Lake City, UT (200,000 square feet; opened in 1962; 88 associates)
  • Landmark, Alexandria, VA (201,000 square feet; opened in 1965; 119 associates)
  • River Ridge, Lynchburg, VA (144,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 60 associates)
  • Everett, Everett, WA (133,000 square feet; opened in 1977; 109 associates)
  • Three Rivers, Kelso, WA (51,000 square feet; opened in 1987; 57 associates)
  • Valley View, La Crosse, WI (101,000 square feet; opened in 1980; 57 associates)
  • Simi Valley Town Center (men's/home/kids), Simi Valley, CA (190,000 square feet; opened in 2006; 105 associates)
  • Mall at Tuttle Crossing (furniture/home/kids/men's), Dublin, OH (227,000 square feet; opened in 2003; 52 associates)

Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

rated:
Macy's is leaving four Philadelphia-area malls that are struggling, as determined by the Philly Business Journal. That will leave eight in the Delaware Valley tri-state region.

rated:
I'm shocked they are only closing one in GA.  There are several that are ghost towns pretty much every day.

rated:
Are there any pattern in these closings?

rated:
The problem Macy's has is that they've bought way too many different stores with different identities over the years and tried to make them all one big happy chain with an identity that is hard to figure out. I've known a lot of not-so-wealthy people look at Macy's as a high end department store (and in many of these cities where they're located these days, it probably is the highest end department store you'll find). I've also known a lot of wealthy people who look at Macy's as something very low end along the lines of Sears. I honestly don't know what to think of it, so I don't even bother shopping there personally (though I DID buy an Apple Watch there recently due to having Plenti points to use and since Macy's gift cards can be obtained cheaply online).

They're basically alienating everybody, I think. They were too aggressive in their quest to make Macy's a national chain, so they started slapping the word Macy's on chains like L.S. Ayres, Marshall Field's, Famous-Barr, Lazarus, Rich's, etc. without realizing that people actually liked the distinct identities of those chains and felt more connected to them.

(By the way, on that last note, you'll find Macy's sells tote bags and t-shirts on their website with logos of those stores they killed off... it's apparently something that their lawyers suggested to win a trademark lawsuit a year or so ago. It's a rather interesting story.)

rated:
This will not stand....President Trump will threaten to take his men's suits and Ivanka's shoes if they
don't reverse this decision...that will teach them.

rated:
WorkerAnt said:   Are there any pattern in these closings?
  

guessing stores Macy's ID'ed as low performing units. otherwise on the surface, no, large cities and smaller towns seem to affected about equally.

rated:
Looks like one store is near me. Decent mall with what appears to be decent foot traffic. I do admit when I visit I rarely if ever actually go into the Macy's store. Also had a Sports Authority in the same mall close down. Oh and thanks for reminding me of L.S. Ayres and Lazarus brand....I'd forgotten about them.

rated:
I believe Macy's was the first to dump the Trump brand.. I guess he won't be calling to save these jobs.(probably laughing right now). Good Job Macy's.. shot yourself in the foot...

rated:
Maphatlal said:   I believe Macy's was the first to dump the Trump brand.. I guess he won't be calling to save these jobs.(probably laughing right now). Good Job Macy's. . shot yourself in the foot...
  Yes, I'm sure that made difference.

rated:
sdskees said:   The problem Macy's has is that they've bought way too many different stores with different identities over the years and tried to make them all one big happy chain with an identity that is hard to figure out. I've known a lot of not-so-wealthy people look at Macy's as a high end department store (and in many of these cities where they're located these days, it probably is the highest end department store you'll find). I've also known a lot of wealthy people who look at Macy's as something very low end along the lines of Sears. I honestly don't know what to think of it, so I don't even bother shopping there personally (though I DID buy an Apple Watch there recently due to having Plenti points to use and since Macy's gift cards can be obtained cheaply online).
 This is really, really well said. 

I come from a relatively small town (~80,000), and that's how Macy's is perceived here -- it's sort of a "higher-end" store. I think the problem lies primarily in the fact that they have a very gimmicky pricing scheme. At Macy's, you see a lot of items marked at a very high price (say, a collared shirt for $90) that's perpetually "discounted" at 75% to $22.50.

Actually, as I'm typing this up, it just occurred to me I was in Macy's a couple days ago returning a fleece blanket I got for Christmas. The blanket was nothing special, the type of thing you routinely see on sale for $5-10 via sites like FW. Well, the sticker price for the blanket at Macy's was $60. My cousin (she bought it for me) paid $16. Even the cashier, who had to look up the transaction in the computer, remarked, "wow -- she really got a good deal on this. This is $60 regular price!" 

Their "sales" feel very gimmicky to me. I know it's a common tactic -- you know, creating the illusion that something is heavily discounted and is a "can't-miss" sale -- but it definitely creates a perception of a store being expensive, and I think that for sure scares some people off. 

rated:
I guess they need to sock away some money for the price fixing suit they're facing, (ie..your $60 blanket example.)

http://legalinsurrection.com/2016/12/city-of-los-angeles-sues-jc... 

  • Quick Reply:  Have something quick to contribute? Just reply below and you're done! hide Quick Reply
     
    Click here for full-featured reply.


Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2017