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I've noticed ever since eBay and Paypal separated that if I process a partial refund for a buyer (without an eBay case opened) it is reflected in the sold listing page but never reflects in my invoice as a final valuation credit.  Obviously eBay knows about the adjustment or it would never be reflected anywhere in the sold listing page.  I've had to call everytime it happens and explain the situation to get my credit processed.

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I haven't sold anything in a really long time, unfortunately.

There are all kinds of laws protecting active duty military... (more)

scripta (Jan. 24, 2017 @ 9:20p) |

But is it as simple as "not refunding money when due?" It sounds like the guy gets his refunds. Do the terms and conditi... (more)

meade18 (Jan. 26, 2017 @ 8:55a) |

^^^ I disagree with you on both points, but I think it's pointless to argue the details.

scripta (Jan. 26, 2017 @ 6:24p) |

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rated:
Sorry I'm having a hard time following that.

Can you illustrate an example with specifics? Whats the financial impact to you from this exactly? If this doesn't cost you money then I can't see why there'd be a lawsuit. Does the problem impact the fee eBay charges you?

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It affects anyone that sells on eBay and gives a partial refund to a buyer but in turn never receives the final valuation credit from eBay automatically.

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Example:
I sell a toy to a buyer on eBay. Buyer messages me saying there is a defect and I offer a partial refund and they keep the toy. I go to paypal and initiate a partial refund. The adjustment/refund shows up on the sold listing page on eBay, proving eBay has access to refund transactions on paypal. I go to check my invoice and I am still charged the full final valuation fee with no credit for the partial refund.

P.S. If the buyer opens a case I always see the partial credit of the final valuation fee but cases negatively affect a seller.

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Partial refunds have never given final value fee credits I believe.

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mastroadam said:   Example:
I sell a toy to a buyer on eBay.  Buyer messages me saying there is a defect and I offer a partial refund and they keep the toy. 

  How about just not selling defective toys?

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scoutconnor said:   Partial refunds have never given final value fee credits I believe.
  Incorrect, if a buyer opens a case through eBay you can offer a partial refund and eBay will automatically refund the prorated fees.

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Why did this get moved to deal discussion? This is a financial matter.

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eBay is only supposed to refund the FMV if you issue a full refund:
http://pages.ebay.com/help/sell/insertion-fee.html#fvf
You might have been lucky to get the partial credits manually.

As for your other question, there's a reason why people look elsewhere for deals.
At least your threads aren't "magically" censored like mine often are.

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DeGlass said:   eBay is only supposed to refund the FMV if you issue a full refund:
http://pages.ebay.com/help/sell/insertion-fee.html#fvf 
You might have been lucky to get the partial credits manually.

As for your other question, there's a reason why people look elsewhere for deals.
At least your threads aren't "magically" censored like mine often are.

  http://pages.ebay.com/help/sell/credits.html

"You resolve a transaction issue and refund the buyer "

A refund is a refund whether it is partial or full.

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As far as I know, it has always been called a Final Value Fee credit, not "final valuation" credit.

You could try suing, but are the amounts really worth it to you? It's 10% of the refund, right?

Is it a problem to ask the customer to open a case each time? I haven't sold anything in a while.

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scripta said:   As far as I know, it has always been called a Final Value Fee credit, not "final valuation" credit.

You could try suing, but are the amounts really worth it to you? It's 10% of the refund, right?

Is it a problem to ask the customer to open a case each time? I haven't sold anything in a while.

  Yes it's a small amount each time, that's the reason for a class action.  Yes it's a problem for the customer to open a case, it hurts the sellers detailed ratings (which can lead to lower search ranking and taking away the 20% discount on fees)

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There is similar shadiness going on with eBay bucks & gift cards & eBay/paypal fees on them for the seller. I contacted a law firm that advertised class actions, some low level rep called me to capture more details and said they'd forward it to the law firm - heard nothing back either way.

Also, if eBay removes your listing because of a "suspicious bidder" as they say it, they don't credit you the FVF for some reason even though they will refund the paypal account.

I think the eBay/paypal split was probably set up just perfectly for them to separate fees and claim that they aren't related so don't need to do credits/fees in conjunction with each - even though eBay/paypal are so tightly integrated into the sales process.

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I understand what you are describing and I see why it stinks, but I don't see how you get from "This eBay/Paypal policy stinks," to "They have violated a contract and I can recover damages by suing them." You say when this happens and you call, you get the credit. Just because you had to call and it doesn't happen automatically, doesn't mean you have been wronged. It's nice to point this out to people who didn't know about it and advise them to call to get the credit, but I just don't see how it rises to a lawsuit when eBay has no problem issuing the credit when you call and ask for it.

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meade18 said:   I understand what you are describing and I see why it stinks, but I don't see how you get from "This eBay /Paypal policy stinks," to "They have violated a contract and I can recover damages by suing them." You say when this happens and you call, you get the credit. Just because you had to call and it doesn't happen automatically, doesn't mean you have been wronged. It's nice to point this out to people who didn't know about it and advise them to call to get the credit, but I just don't see how it rises to a lawsuit when eBay has no problem issuing the credit when you call and ask for it.Are you a legal expert? Because to me, (1) not refunding money when due and (2) knowing about the problem but not doing anything about it for years does rise to the level of class action. The only thing I question is whether the FVF refund is out of the goodness of their heart. They could just change the T&C to say "no FVF refunds" and I don't think anyone would be able to do anything about it. eBay can be evil and do whatever they want, and everyone will bend over and take it, because there's no real competition.

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scripta said:   
meade18 said:   I understand what you are describing and I see why it stinks, but I don't see how you get from "This eBay /Paypal policy stinks," to "They have violated a contract and I can recover damages by suing them." You say when this happens and you call, you get the credit. Just because you had to call and it doesn't happen automatically, doesn't mean you have been wronged. It's nice to point this out to people who didn't know about it and advise them to call to get the credit, but I just don't see how it rises to a lawsuit when eBay has no problem issuing the credit when you call and ask for it.
Are you a legal expert? Because to me, (1) not refunding money when due and (2) knowing about the problem but not doing anything about it for years does rise to the level of class action. The only thing I question is whether the FVF refund is out of the goodness of their heart. They could just change the T&C to say "no FVF refunds" and I don't think anyone would be able to do anything about it. eBay can be evil and do whatever they want, and everyone will bend over and take it, because there's no real competition.

  

Even if they change there terms it still does not change their culpability from past indiscretions.   

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Just got off the phone with a lawyer and due to the arbitration clause there is little to no hope for a class action.

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mastroadam said:   Just got off the phone with a lawyer and due to the arbitration clause there is little to no hope for a class action.I opted out (option to opt out was given in October of 2012). Why didn't you?!
Also as you said it doesn't exclude them from past indiscretions. I believe the arbitration provision was added in 2012.

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scripta said:   
mastroadam said:   Just got off the phone with a lawyer and due to the arbitration clause there is little to no hope for a class action.
I opted out (option to opt out was given in October of 2012). Why didn't you?!
Also as you said it doesn't exclude them from past indiscretions. I believe the arbitration provision was added in 2012.

  Honesty I was active duty military in 2012 and eBay was just a blip on the radar back then.  I would encourage you to pursue this if you opted out,  I just like to see wrongs righted in this world.

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I haven't sold anything in a really long time, unfortunately.

There are all kinds of laws protecting active duty military. I wonder if failure to respond to a time-sensitive letter like "change in terms" due to this is something you can pursue

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scripta said:   
meade18 said:   I understand what you are describing and I see why it stinks, but I don't see how you get from "This eBay /Paypal policy stinks," to "They have violated a contract and I can recover damages by suing them." You say when this happens and you call, you get the credit. Just because you had to call and it doesn't happen automatically, doesn't mean you have been wronged. It's nice to point this out to people who didn't know about it and advise them to call to get the credit, but I just don't see how it rises to a lawsuit when eBay has no problem issuing the credit when you call and ask for it.
Are you a legal expert? Because to me, (1) not refunding money when due and (2) knowing about the problem but not doing anything about it for years does rise to the level of class action. The only thing I question is whether the FVF refund is out of the goodness of their heart. They could just change the T&C to say "no FVF refunds" and I don't think anyone would be able to do anything about it. eBay can be evil and do whatever they want, and everyone will bend over and take it, because there's no real competition.

  
But is it as simple as "not refunding money when due?" It sounds like the guy gets his refunds. Do the terms and conditions specify how this is supposed to work? I have no idea. Maybe they are violating them, maybe not. But without that claim (the OP didn't make that claim), where is the lawsuit?

Keep in mind, you can get your refund automatically if a case is opened. eBay may have structured their terms and conditions in a way that makes receiving a refund more difficuly if you try to avoid opening cases. That makes sense because if a seller is constantly providing refunds or discounts for shoddy products or services, yet cases are never opened, its harder to know how crappy the seller is and the eBay community as a whole is being harmed.

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^^^ I disagree with you on both points, but I think it's pointless to argue the details.

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