Car tool set or multi/universal tool set deal?

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Can anybody suggest a good tool set which i could use for Home, Car and motorcycle? Are power tools better? 

200+ piece ones I found - Cresent, Stanley, Dewalts...I see mixed reviews on them. Some say it is good home use but not garage use but is there one brand/set/kit that might be universal?

thanks in advance!  

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http://thesweethome.com/reviews/the-best-tools-and-toolbox/

Most sets have a mix of useful stuff and junk you won't use and isn't worth paying for. Above article should suit you well for home. That site does a decent job finding best bang for buck, and then denoting an upgrade pick and a budget pick. A hammer, a crescent wrench, screwdriver, and pliers should do you to start. Add rest over time as needed/budget allows.

For car/motorcycle work, what do you want to do? Occasional oil change/tire rotation? Engine maintenance? Major stuff? A good socket set from any reputable company should be a good starting point, along with the screw drivers and whatnot from the household tools. Metric vs Standard is a consideration (check what your car/bike use).

As for power tools, a battery powered kit (Lithium Ion only) from a reputable brand with a drill and 1-2 more tools (e.g. circular saw, etc) should serve you well for occasional household duty. Ryobi is a good value, not high end but good for the home-gamer. Dewalt or other name brands cost more and are better tools, but you're unlikely to notice it with light household duty.

jarfykk said:   http://thesweethome.com/reviews/the-best-tools-and-toolbox/ 

Most sets have a mix of useful stuff and junk you won't use and isn't worth paying for. Above article should suit you well for home. That site does a decent job finding best bang for buck, and then denoting an upgrade pick and a budget pick. A hammer, a crescent wrench, screwdriver, and pliers should do you to start. Add rest over time as needed/budget allows.

For car/motorcycle work, what do you want to do? Occasional oil change/tire rotation? Engine maintenance? Major stuff? A good socket set from any reputable company should be a good starting point, along with the screw drivers and whatnot from the household tools. Metric vs Standard is a consideration (check what your car/bike use).

As for power tools, a battery powered kit (Lithium Ion only) from a reputable brand with a drill and 1-2 more tools (e.g. circular saw, etc) should serve you well for occasional household duty. Ryobi is a good value, not high end but good for the home-gamer. Dewalt or other name brands cost more and are better tools, but you're unlikely to notice it with light household duty.

  
Appreciate your response. Home use might be low compared to car/motorcycle fix ups. I do have some random tools for home use. I was considering if there is a all in one or universal set. For a automobile, pretty much don't have anything. Might be doing oil changes and tire rotations to begin and the next big thing I wanna try is the brake job and shocks. 

There is no such 'universal' set because especially in cars, a lot of tools are car specific.
Even Oil Changes can need special equipment.

Find a large set and then buy the extra parts you need as you need them.

The sets are intriguing but some of the items will be useless (wrong sizes for your purpose, etc).

I have a mishmosh of hand tools for the house, primarily Sears Craftsman, Snap-On and a Gearwrench set. Certain tools that I have bought have been donated because they don't work for me eg strap wrenches. I keep a tool box for standard tools and a separate tool bag for infrequently used and plumbing-specific tools. My most frequently used item is a Bosch cordless drill that I use with screwdriver bits. It's an older model and heavy but does the job.

For the car I really don't have any tools since the car was purchased new and until recently has been under extended service contract. For simple repairs like wiper replacement, etc. no tools are required.

Rather than making the big investment, first check in your city or county to see if they have a tool lending library. It's cool! You can borrow tools that you may only need once and you can try out ones that you might want to buy yourself.

If you want to learn some basic auto repair, I highly recommend a local community college course if possible. Works wonders getting down basics.

Another one is Youtube videos. Some of the best is ChrisFix, https://www.youtube.com/user/PaintballOO7, whose videos are simple and easy to understand. The description usually links to the parts/tools required and/or he shows in video. You'll quickly see that what you need varies by car, but if all you're looking at it oil changes and tire rotations, pretty simple stuff tool-wise (for most cars, some are ungodly complex).

Brake job also pretty straightforward, recommend having someone who knows what they're doing help you with it the first time though...or your car might become undriveable with a brake job half-done and require a tow to mechanic to fix. Not very Fatwallet. Watch the below video...if you think you're Handy enough to do it, up to you. Not hard, but one level harder than tire rotations.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6RQ9UabOIPg



@ jarfykk I'm finding that site very interesting. TY. I'm reviewing the picks there. Maybe I can replace my 40lbs+ of emergency trunk tools with far fewer & lighten the load & free up some space. A few years ago I got rid of some tools cause they were STD & never needed.



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