Regenerative Braking in Hybrid Car

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I'm not extremely knowledgeable about cars, but have been looking into buying a Prius (hybrid, not plug-in). I understand there is a concept of regenerative braking where braking actually charges the battery. Would I be able to power my car solely on regenerative braking (i.e. never having to go to the gas station?). 

My commute is about 5 miles one way (not sure if that helps in determining whether regenerative braking alone is feasible for driving)--and I'm looking to purchase a used prius.

Any other details on how regenerative braking works would be appreciated. TIA.

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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regenerative_brake
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/auto-parts/brakes/brake-types/rege...

The answer to your questions is "No." The regenerative braking captures just a small (but useful) fraction of the energy you're expending to move the 3,000 pound vehicle.

Prius plug in owner here.

You would not, and the reason is simple physics. Regenerative braking captures less than 100% of the original power to get the car moving (battery or gas) so you dont capture all of the energy back into the battery.

if you truly never want to go to gas station, i would recommend the plug in. You get roughly 10 miles on battery alone so your commute would be on only battery but you would have to plug it in at the end of the day.

Genetics said:   Prius plug in owner here.

You would not, and the reason is simple physics. Regenerative braking captures less than 100% of the original power to get the car moving (battery or gas) so you dont capture all of the energy back into the battery.

if you truly never want to go to gas station, i would recommend the plug in. You get roughly 10 miles on battery alone so your commute would be on only battery but you would have to plug it in at the end of the day.

  
For a 5 mile commute I would just get a small scooter or even a moped and not worry about gas.  That is what I did in Charlotte.

You may be able to live completely on regenerative braking if you started at the top of the mountain and made a one way trip from the mountain top to the bottom and kept braking as soon as the car had some velocity. How do you get back to the top of the mountain in order to repeat this process is the classical dilemma of perpetual motion machines.

coupons2828 said:   I'm not extremely knowledgeable about cars, but have been looking into buying a Prius (hybrid, not plug-in). I understand there is a concept of regenerative braking where braking actually charges the battery. Would I be able to power my car solely on regenerative braking (i.e. never having to go to the gas station?). 

My commute is about 5 miles one way (not sure if that helps in determining whether regenerative braking alone is feasible for driving)--and I'm looking to purchase a used prius.

Any other details on how regenerative braking works would be appreciated. TIA.

What is your budget for the prius? If it's for a used car, buy a cheap used electric car like a Smart ED or Fiat 500e. They cost around $4000-$6000. Use the money you save on gas and maintenance on a rental car when you need to travel far. You need to have access to a 120v outlet to charge.

RedWolfe01 said:   <edit> 
For a 5 mile commute I would just get a small scooter or even a moped and not worry about gas.  That is what I did in Charlotte.
 

  In Charlotte?  You're brave.  A scooter in Nascar town. 

coupons2828 said:   I'm not extremely knowledgeable about cars, but have been looking into buying a Prius (hybrid, not plug-in). I understand there is a concept of regenerative braking where braking actually charges the battery. Would I be able to power my car solely on regenerative braking (i.e. never having to go to the gas station?). 

My commute is about 5 miles one way (not sure if that helps in determining whether regenerative braking alone is feasible for driving)--and I'm looking to purchase a used prius.

Any other details on how regenerative braking works would be appreciated. TIA.

  Why Prius though?

honkinggoose said:   
RedWolfe01 said:   <edit> 
For a 5 mile commute I would just get a small scooter or even a moped and not worry about gas.  That is what I did in Charlotte.

  In Charlotte?  You're brave.  A scooter in Nascar town. 

  
My 400cc scooter ran up to 105MPH...  My 650cc one has a #$%# governor that kicks in around 115 -- dunno WHAT BMW was thinking with THAT one....

Buy a Plug-In-Hybrid.

The 2013/2014 C-Max ENERGI Model can be had for <$10k at auctions. Find a Broker. 20 Mile electric range. Blows The Prius away in everything except highway MPGs. How do I know, I have both. If you want a sedan, the Ford Fusion Energi is the same drive-train, but more $$$.

I believe the C-Max and Fusion Energi models are some of the most under appreciated and best bang for the buck [used] cars in this country. I wish they marketed them more. 
 

RedWolfe01 said:   
Genetics said:   Prius plug in owner here.

You would not, and the reason is simple physics. Regenerative braking captures less than 100% of the original power to get the car moving (battery or gas) so you dont capture all of the energy back into the battery.

if you truly never want to go to gas station, i would recommend the plug in. You get roughly 10 miles on battery alone so your commute would be on only battery but you would have to plug it in at the end of the day.

  
For a 5 mile commute I would just get a small scooter or even a moped and not worry about gas.  That is what I did in Charlotte.

  Not much fun when it's raining, when it's 90 degrees with 90% humidity, when it's 20 degrees with 0 degrees wind chill.

Why is this question being asked on a Finance forum? There are a million car-related forums/message boards where it's more appropriate to ask this, and you'll get better answers.

because, physics

5 miles?

Get a bicycle. 

Your legs will regenerate some energy when you brake, and be ready to pedal when you need to accelerate again. 

No, you can not run a car solely on regenerative braking. If you put a wind turbine on the roof, though....

(No. Still no)

For a 5 mile commute, you will likely never recoup the cost premium for a hybrid vehicle. A traditional small or mid-sized car driven that few miles per year will still consume far less gasoline (and produce fewer emissions) than a Prius on a longer, more average daily commute. Plus, you will not have toxic chemical batteries and exotic electric equipment, which has its own significant environmental impact.

NEDeals said:   A traditional small or mid-sized car
 

  
You mean a Crown Vic, right?

Plugin electric and see if your company has free charging station or outlet you can plug in. That way, you won't pay for gas or electricity.

Everyone here is technically incorrect. The answer to your question is a definitive 'yes'.

That is, with one very small assumption. Your commute is 100% downhill in both directions.

Yes, it's possible if your commute is downhill both ways.

Mr0ffic3r said:   Buy a Plug-In-Hybrid.

The 2013/2014 C-Max ENERGI Model can be had for <$10k at auctions. Find a Broker. 20 Mile electric range. Blows The Prius away in everything except highway MPGs. How do I know, I have both. If you want a sedan, the Ford Fusion Energi is the same drive-train, but more $$$.

I believe the C-Max and Fusion Energi models are some of the most under appreciated and best bang for the buck [used] cars in this country. I wish they marketed them more. 

  Couldnt agree more. I had a 2013 Cmax Energi with a similar commute and I filled gas maybe once every 2 months.

coupons2828 said:   I'm not extremely knowledgeable about cars, but have been looking into buying a Prius (hybrid, not plug-in). I understand there is a concept of regenerative braking where braking actually charges the battery. Would I be able to power my car solely on regenerative braking (i.e. never having to go to the gas station?). 

My commute is about 5 miles one way (not sure if that helps in determining whether regenerative braking alone is feasible for driving)--and I'm looking to purchase a used prius.

Any other details on how regenerative braking works would be appreciated. TIA.

  
What you're referring to is a perpetual motion machine.  The laws of thermodynamics make this impossible, yet lay-people continually try to patent bogus products that claim to do so.  It's so common that the patent office outright rejects any patents involving perpetual motion machines.
https://www.uspto.gov/web/offices/pac/mpep/s608.html#d0e50532

If you REALLY want to try out and not pay too much get the Fiat 500e used. Those are going for less than 8k. Of course no gas engine so short trips only. It has that 'regenerative' braking you are looking for.

American school system... sigh...

If the $3 a week in gas to go 5 miles 10 times is a deal breaker you might not want to buy a car

If you are in California there's a new law that will increase gas by 15 cents...again




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