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Dell has the Dell Inspiron Desktop w/  Intel Core i7, 16GB RAM, 2TB HDD  on sale for $899.00 - $320 Off w/ Coupon Code "DELLDT579" = $579.00 with free shipping


  • Intel Core i7-4790 Quad Core (Up to 4GHz, 8M Cache)
  • Intel HD Graphics
  • 16GB Dual Channel DDR3 1600MHz (8GBx2)
  • 2TB 7200 RPM Hard Drive
  • Windows 7 Home Premium 64-Bit



Reviews:


Compare at Amazon from $799.00. 

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
Can't get the coupon to work.  Any tricks?

dacrew55 (Jul. 21, 2016 @ 12:18p) |

Just wait for them to post the deal/sale again... it will happen again.

slappycakes (Jul. 21, 2016 @ 6:36p) |

Can you do a clean install of Windows 10 with what they give you?

john99 (Jul. 29, 2016 @ 6:21p) |

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it's ok.... having a relatively newer i7 with 16gb of ram is pointless on a regular old hard drive.... without an SSD you'll be waiting for the harddrive in anything tasking

Computer builder here, at this price not even worth the price to build this from the ground up.

If you can spare $50 and get SSD this thing will fly.

What's the reasonably priced recommended graphics card for gaming now a days?

OP, you put up reviews that aren't even for this model. Those are for i3 systems. I'm sure most reviews of this model would be significantly different.

diswes said:   Computer builder here, at this price not even worth the price to build this from the ground up.
  Most fully assembled systems from a major manufacturer are like that. That DOES NOT mean it's necessarily a good value. It all depends what you need it for.
The individual component cost is immaterial if the overall package is so nerfed that you can't make good use of the capabilities:

1) Dell  includes a crappy 260-300W power supply, and a video card with minimal capability. You need to upgrade both to use this system for high-powered gaming
2) The connections between the motherboard and PSU are usually proprietary on a Dell. The PSU bay dimensions may also be non-standard. How will you upgrade the PSU?
3) The BIOS on a Dell has minimal settings, designed for the home user with little knowledge of computers. Overclocking is not possible. Manually controlling fan speeds may also not be possible. The case and motherboard is not designed for aftermarket coolers. 

None of the above matters if you're just surfing the web with this machine, but unless you like throwing money down the toilet, why would you buy an i7 for internet surfing? You can get a fully capable used i5 machine on eBay for approx $130 (I just bought one, that's how I know) that will more than fulfill all your average home user needs, and wouldn't be one bit slower for those applications.

Why spend an extra $400+ for this Dell unless you have a high-end use for it? If high-end gaming is not an option, and you're not using it for calculation-intensive databases, I just don't see any value.

Get a cheap $100-$150 i3 or i5 used computer, and use some of the cash you saved to add an SSD. That system will be far faster for the average user than this Dell
 

jschuman said:   What's the reasonably priced recommended graphics card for gaming now a days?
That's like asking" What's the reasonably priced recommended sports car nowadays?
There is no good answer since the choice depends completely on your needs. One person's 'reasonably priced' is another person's 'massive overkill'. Many people would gag at spending $200 on a video card when you can get an entire computer for less than that. Basic gaming can even be done with the i7's built-in graphics capability. No need for a card at all.

You can spend anywhere from $100 to $1000 on the card alone, and then add all sorts of fancy cooling on top to allow CPU and GPU overclocking. It all depends on what type of gaming you're doing.

One thing is for sure though: This Dell 's PSU won't support any higher-end card, which is a critical weakness of the system.

I'm looking to get this for my church. Just need to drive a couple wall mounted monitors. Will this be good enough.

acrowming said:   I'm looking to get this for my church. Just need to drive a couple wall mounted monitors. Will this be good enough.
  "I/O Ports
Front - (2) USB 3.0, 5:1 Multi-Card Reader, (1)Audio Combo Jack
Rear - Line in/out and Microphone Port, (1) VGA, (1) HDMI out, (4) USB 2.0, Network Port, DC power"

only 2 display outputs. 

acrowming said:   I'm looking to get this for my church. Just need to drive a couple wall mounted monitors. Will this be good enough.
  WAY overkill for that...

This is just a glorified desktop, lots of power but no use for it really, like stated above. Doesn't matter if you have an i7 with 16GB of ram if your using a spinning hard drive.

"DELLDT579" = $579.00 using code DELLDT579
However not getting it to work, still says 899
Is this deal still alive?

Thanks guys

Good price.

CPU alone costs $305
16 Gb RAM: $65
entry level motherboard: $40
good price for 2 Gb HD: $50
good price for DVD drive: $10
power supply: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
case: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
Windows license: $100 (I'm being generous with good price & assuming reputable dealer)

That's $570 right there so yes you can beat $579, but assumes rebates, good prices, and free shipping for everything listed and ignores the cost of time to assemble and assumes Dell tech support, warranty, keyboard, mouse are worth $0 to you. It also ignores that you can get 5% cash back if you join free Dell Advantage program before ordering:
http://www.dell.com/en-us/member/learn/finance-and-rewards/rewar...
and ignores that you can get $25 off the cost of this PC if you first join Dell Advantage (I assume anyway - I recently joined Dell Advantage AFTER registering a Dell PC I bought several months ago but finally setup and got this email):
$25 in Starter Rewards*
• Free 2nd business day shipping*
• 5% back in rewards* on all purchases
• 10% back in rewards* when you finance with Dell Preferred Account™ Δ
• Exclusive access to special offers and presale events

As for the question of lack of upgradeability on Dells, I can only speak with my experience on my Inspiron 3000 purchased last Dec for the killer price of $199 (with Windows PRO license):
https://www.fatwallet.com/forums/expired-deals/1474156/?start=0
I upgraded EVERYTHING except the motherboard and case:
i3 > i7
8Gb > 16Gb
300 watt PS > 600 watt PS
GTX 750 TI single slot video card
1 Tb HD > 480 Gb SSD + 2 Tb secondary drive
DVDRW > BDRW + BDROM

CPU and RAM I had to buy, everything else was transplanted upgrades from a 2007 Q6600 PC it will be replacing (I also had a spare unopened power supply I got free after rebate sometime last year). Also took advantage of the free Windows 7 to Windows 10 upgrade. If I upgrade the video card to GTX 1070 or 1080, I'll be ready for virtual reality hardware.

So with this system from OP, assuming it's just as upgradeable as mine, just slap a power supply (which you can get free after rebate if you wait for a deal) and high end video card in there and you've got yourself and very high performance system ready for VR. If you don't already own a SSD you can transfer into this Dell, then you won't be missing out on anything you don't already have and you can always buy one later. Meanwhile, you're high-spec on everything else.

Very hard to build your own with specs like the one in OP and come out cheaper unless you already own multiple components to build from. So do I get an achievement for sounding like a Dell shill or what?

jschuman said:   What's the reasonably priced recommended graphics card for gaming now a days?
 

  I'm not expert on graphics cards, but if I was looking for a gaming card that's good enough for VR but probably not good enough for 4k resolution gaming going forward, I think I'd be looking at this GTX 1060 for $249:
http://www.pcworld.com/article/3092193/components-graphics/nvidi...
http://www.geforce.com/hardware/10series/geforce-gtx-1060

Don't know the power supply in this Dell, but it will likely need an upgraded one that has a 6-pin cable to plug into the video card. Your next step down without having to upgrade the power supply looks to be this:
http://www.evga.com/articles/00990/evga-geforce-gtx-950-low-powe...
or by another maker (pay attention to get a model without 6-pin power requirement)
 

Looks good, however still can't get the price after putting in the code DELLDT579
Anyone have any luck with this? - thanks

not that good of a deal. yeah the cpu is $300 but thats about it.

Fathead said:   "DELLDT579" = $579.00 using code DELLDT579
However not getting it to work, still says 899
Is this deal still alive?

Thanks guys

  Friend tried yesterday and got message that discount was no longer valid.

I just ordered one and got the discount, try again.

If the SSD is so good and a fairly economical upgrade why are desktop PCs coming with SSD?

Some of you are saying this system is overkill. Don't they always say that when you're buying a PC and then turns out it was a good idea as in a long lasting system?

rickster9 said:   If the SSD is so good and a fairly economical upgrade why are desktop PCs coming with SSD?

Some of you are saying this system is overkill. Don't they always say that when you're buying a PC and then turns out it was a good idea as in a long lasting system?

  You mean "why are PC's NOT coming with an SSD?" If that is what you mean, good question. My guess is that the average unsophisticated consumer doesn't understand the benefits, so they won't pay for it.

This system is not overkill for business use, which is what Dell is selling it for.

This system is overkill, and more importantly, unbalanced, for home use. It's like putting a Ferrari engine in a lawnmower. The i7 is way too much power. The power supply is way underpowered. The graphics is way underpowered (for home use). That means it will become obsolete SOONER than many cheaper (but balanced and upgradeable) computers. You will never be able to use the power of the i7 for home applications, even 10 years from now, because the other parts of the computer don't allow you to, and most likely cannot be upgraded.

If you have the means to build, build it. It may cost more but you don't get piece of crap parts that noramlly fail in the first year that you get from pre-built. This PC is for people who have no clue how to build or are pretty ignorant about PC's. I have no clue why they would stick an i7 in a PC that will be used for surfing the Internet. It's like they went top heavy and skimped the rest.

SinCityBlitz said:   If you have the means to build, build it. It may cost more but you don't get piece of crap parts that noramlly fail in the first year that you get from pre-built. This PC is for people who have no clue how to build or are pretty ignorant about PC's. I have no clue why they would stick an i7 in a PC that will be used for surfing the Internet. It's like they went top heavy and skimped the rest.
  The computer is aimed at business use, not home use. In that context, it makes sense since calculation-heavy programs need an i7. The problem is that FW members are confusing the two and assuming that a small business PC is good for home use. It's not. The apps are totally different (unless the business user is a slacker who surfs the net all day!)

Picked on up too. good price, can get a small SSD hdd as the main & slave this larger drive. add a little ram to max it out.
Didn't work on the 13th, working now. plus 2% rebate

rickster9 said:   If the SSD is so good and a fairly economical upgrade why are desktop PCs coming with SSD?

Some of you are saying this system is overkill. Don't they always say that when you're buying a PC and then turns out it was a good idea as in a long lasting system?

  Because manufacturers have too much capital equipment designed to make HDDs and can still profit beyond their variable costs, and because theres a ton of inventory out there that they need to soak up.

Dell puts them in everything because they get a sweetheart deal from the MFG.

Save another $50 if you have this deal on your Amex card
$50 statement credit on purchases $299+

https://www.fatwallet.com/forums/hot-deals/1513669/

Evander said:   Good price.

CPU alone costs $305
16 Gb RAM: $65
entry level motherboard: $40
good price for 2 Gb HD: $50
good price for DVD drive: $10
power supply: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
case: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
Windows license: $100 (I'm being generous with good price & assuming reputable dealer)

That's $570 right there so yes you can beat $579, but assumes rebates, good prices, and free shipping for everything listed and ignores the cost of time to assemble and assumes Dell tech support, warranty, keyboard, mouse are worth $0 to you.
It also ignores that you can get 5% cash back if you join free Dell Advantage program before ordering:
...

  
I totally disagree. I'm with canoeguy1 on this...

Your stated value of components on this system:
CPU alone costs $305
16 Gb RAM: $65
entry level motherboard: $40
good price for 2 Gb HD: $50
good price for DVD drive: $10
power supply: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
case: $0 (I'll be generous and say you can get free after rebate)
Windows license: $100 (I'm being generous with good price & assuming reputable dealer)

It *may* be a good value if you're using all of the parts once you set it up to your liking. Most likely it won't be to your liking out of the box. It's not a great config overall: it's overspec'ed CPU wise and underspec'ed HDD-wise and 3D-graphics/2D-display capability-wise.

You're pretty much on the hook for an SSD, if you want to enjoy using this system. Nice thing is you can use the 2TB hard drive to store photos or videos or whatever.
SSD: +$50 at least

Additionally if you wanted to use this for gaming:
Graphics card: $200+ (assuming it has a PCIe x16 slot that can be configured for primary display.)
PSU for power (comes with 300W supply): $50+ (assuming it will work with the current motherboard)

If regular PSUs are not compatible with the Dell mainboard, then you have to upgrade it, which will cost money, and will likely invalidate the Windows license and pretty much make this deal as cold as ice.

Overall, it's just not a good balance of components and the upgrade paths are unclear. If you want to drive two digital displays you can't even do it given it only has one HDMI out and 1 VGA out. 

In almost all cases, it's not worth it since it's a poorly balanced system. We've had good enough systems for years now, and they're available much cheaper than this...

It's an entry level system with a good CPU and lots of RAM. These old marketing tricks shouldn't work anymore...
 

jschuman said:   What's the reasonably priced recommended graphics card for gaming now a days?
This system comes with a 300W power supply according to that PC Verge review.
Most likely you won't be able to upgrade the graphics to today's levels with that power supply.

SinCityBlitz said:   If you have the means to build, build it. It may cost more but you don't get piece of crap parts that noramlly fail in the first year that you get from pre-built. This PC is for people who have no clue how to build or are pretty ignorant about PC's. I have no clue why they would stick an i7 in a PC that will be used for surfing the Internet. It's like they went top heavy and skimped the rest.
  Complete rubbish.  

Does Dell really still use proprietary power supplies and the like? You think that would be more trouble (and expense) than it is worth as it limits the potential suppliers to Dell. Seems like a flashback to the nineties.

canoeguy1 said:   
rickster9 said:   If the SSD is so good and a fairly economical upgrade why are desktop PCs coming with SSD?

Some of you are saying this system is overkill. Don't they always say that when you're buying a PC and then turns out it was a good idea as in a long lasting system?

  You mean "why are PC's NOT coming with an SSD?" If that is what you mean, good question. My guess is that the average unsophisticated consumer doesn't understand the benefits, so they won't pay for it.

...
 

  

And to point out the obvious to people who don't know...  SSDs cost a lot more.

I'd assume Dell can get a 2TB HDD for ~$50-75.      2TB of SSD space would probably cost $500-750

It would be best to configure such systems with a 2TB HDD for storage plus a ~100 GB SSD for boot drive.   But that still adds $50-75 to the system cost for the small SSD.    Thats not as good since most of your storage isn't as fast but its a lot better since you can get the SSD speed for boot, OS and most of your apps.

Basically, again, people don't understand the value of SSD drives enough to want to pay for it.

 

Dell doesn't feel an i7 is worthy of Wifi AC.

WalterGuy said:   Does Dell really still use proprietary power supplies and the like? You think that would be more trouble (and expense) than it is worth as it limits the potential suppliers to Dell. Seems like a flashback to the nineties.
 
The Dell Inspiron I bought Dec 2015 used a standard power supply and I upgraded it to 600w unit w/o problems.

etee said:   
 

It *may* be a good value if you're using all of the parts once you set it up to your liking. Most likely it won't be to your liking out of the box. It's not a great config overall: it's overspec'ed CPU wise and underspec'ed HDD-wise and 3D-graphics/2D-display capability-wise.

You're pretty much on the hook for an SSD, if you want to enjoy using this system. Nice thing is you can use the 2TB hard drive to store photos or videos or whatever.
SSD: +$50 at least

Additionally if you wanted to use this for gaming:
Graphics card: $200+ (assuming it has a PCIe x16 slot that can be configured for primary display.)
PSU for power (comes with 300W supply): $50+ (assuming it will work with the current motherboard)


 

  
Try looking at it from the perspective of someone using an old system (like my Q6600) who can upgrade to a new one like this Dell that is better in every way. And that can be upgraded should the need arise w/ SSD, GPU, PS. Someone without a SSD now won't be missing out on anything they don't already have if they bought this, but if they really want one an entry level 120Gb drive goes for $36. High end gamers probably already own a PS they can transplant into here. Mid level gamers can use the existing Dell Power Supply and slap a GTX 950 I linked to earlier (or the earlier GTX 750 TI which I transplanted from my Q6600) and can upgrade to higher end later if they want, keeping an eye an free after rebate power supplies in the meantime.

In short, this PC is great for people looking to replace an older PC with specs superior in every way to their current one and/or people who desire a beefy PC now with good upgrade path for later.
Feel free to post a deal for a new PC w/ Windows license + SSD + lower end CPU as a lower cost but still speedy alternative.

This motherboard takes a proprietary power connector most likely. Dell does that sort of thing. The last pre-made desktop computer that was purchased on my behalf was a HP Pavilion Pentium 200 way back in the day. I was pissed I couldn't upgrade that system either. If it's not the power supply, it's the SBIOS that limits you or some other crap. I'm done with those limitations.

Basically, if you want to upgrade this system to a gaming system, you're SOL. You might be able to upgrade to an SSD or low power GPU (likely the PS doesn't have any 6-8 pin PCIe connectors.)

Read that PC Verge review...this is essentially an upgraded entry level system...I wouldn't pay $580 for an entry level system in 2016. Also, I know is that if I'm acquiring a new system I won't allocate $305+ to the budget for the processor when a less expensive even from a few years ago will do. And it sure as hell should be upgradable graphics-wise unlike this system.

Most new systems don't come with SSD because they cost more and the consumer may not value them properly. My 13 year old nephew knows more GBs is better...on a smart phone. He doesn't know much about overall storage system performance. I'm afraid for desktops people still think more TBs is better than a faster storage system, so these OEMs will continue to provide these huge slow inexpensive hard drives.

If you really want a new upgradeable desktop, I'm sorry I don't know who sells those. Usually you'd buy a well-speced desktop directly otherwise, they'll cut corners on the power supply since they couldn't care less about your upgrade options. They never advertise those... New computer warranties don't really give me the warm fuzzies...they should seriously outlast whatever warranty they provide.

By the way, what you're asking for is restrictive and unrealistic...a new system with entry/mid-range processor and SSD is unheard of today.
Wait here is one: http://us-store.acer.com/revo-one-rl85-ur41


This is fatwallet not let's buy compromised entry-level packaged solutions that were overpriced to begin with the moment they're available on discount because there's money burning a hole in my wallet.com.

Check out http://www.pcmag.com/article2/0,2817,2372609,00.asp for desktop recommendations. Get something cheap or expensive...they're all pretty much good enough today.

My current recommendation is to buy a used business class laptop, pop in an SSD and get a docking station if you want that desktop like experience. Windows 10 is nice, so get something that includes a free license.

etee said:   
Read that PC Verge review...this is essentially an upgraded entry level system...I wouldn't pay $580 for an entry level system in 2016. 


This is fatwallet not let's buy compromised entry-level packaged solutions that were overpriced to begin with the moment they're available on discount because there's money burning a hole in my wallet.com.


 

  
The PC Verge review you referenced linked in the OP is for an i3 processor.

"entry-level"?  I don't think that word means what you think it means.  An i7 processor is nobody's "entry-level" PC.  

phutureprimative said:   
etee said:   
Read that PC Verge review...this is essentially an upgraded entry level system...I wouldn't pay $580 for an entry level system in 2016. 


This is fatwallet not let's buy compromised entry-level packaged solutions that were overpriced to begin with the moment they're available on discount because there's money burning a hole in my wallet.com.


 

  
The PC Verge review you referenced linked in the OP is for an i3 processor.

"entry-level"?  I don't think that word means what you think it means.  An i7 processor is nobody's "entry-level" PC.  

  
Additionally, the link in OP has a different CPU than listed in the OP's description. Actual CPU:
Catalog Number:
   4 CAI3650W7PB223

 Module  Description Show Details
Processor 6th Generation Intel® Core™ i7-6700 Processor (8M Cache, up to 4.00 GHz)

 
And even though I'm not buying one, I tried adding this to the cart, and it shows $899 even after trying to apply the coupon. So either OP's link is wrong and/or description is wrong or deal is dead. Coupon didn't apply whether or not I was logged into Dell Advantage
 

I am looking for a cheaper Dell laptop for my brother. Please suggest me configuration for it.

canoeguy1 said:   
SinCityBlitz said:   If you have the means to build, build it. It may cost more but you don't get piece of crap parts that noramlly fail in the first year that you get from pre-built. This PC is for people who have no clue how to build or are pretty ignorant about PC's. I have no clue why they would stick an i7 in a PC that will be used for surfing the Internet. It's like they went top heavy and skimped the rest.
  The computer is aimed at business use, not home use. In that context, it makes sense since calculation-heavy programs need an i7. The problem is that FW members are confusing the two and assuming that a small business PC is good for home use. It's not. The apps are totally different (unless the business user is a slacker who surfs the net all day!)

  
Actually its not, its an i7 entry level machine for consumers.  (Inspiron is their "normal" consumer line -- Optiplex/Vostro and Lattitude are business quality systems)  There was a pretty decent mid-tier (XPS) machine at Costco that would be a better choice.

Generally Dell does have standard power connectors, though, unless its an odd shaped unit like a NUC or AIO.  Upgraded them before with no issues. 
jcshuman said: What's the reasonably priced recommended graphics card for gaming now a days?

Pretty much as the other poster said, the nVidia 10 line, how high up it you go is based on how much you want to spend.  They are brand new GPUs, easily the best at the moment -- totally upset the market based on power/price ratio and nobody has caught up yet.
acrowming said: I'm looking to get this for my church. Just need to drive a couple wall mounted monitors. Will this be good enough.

This is a job for a pair of stick or minibox PCs that plug into a HDMI port.  (you can also go Fire or Android sticks too)  The PCs are usually cheaper than you can buy a copy of Windows anyway. 

---
Its pretty common these days to pair a smaller (64 to 256GB) SSD with a HD.  In fact they are already making hybrids that consolidate the two technologies.  Its easy to add it to a PC, but a pain to migrate the active partition and re-allocate the old HD unless you know what you are doing.

Others in the thread are correct though, once you are in this range if you CARE about the PC you might as well build it or have it built.  The only reason store PCs are cheaper than building them is that the big guys like Dell don't have to pay for the OS.  If you have a copy of an older OS that can be upgraded for free (not much longer for that offer, but everyone expects them to extend it) then you can come really close to their pricing -- you can BEAT it if you have other components that you can re-use like case/Power Supply and HDD.  (rarely can you reuse RAM/CPU/MB since that is what upgrades the most -- pins change on CPUs every generation) 

I build my own by choice, but I upgrade friends and family PCs all the time and they tend to be off-the-shelf.

RedWolfe01 said:   ... The only reason store PCs are cheaper than building them is that the big guys like Dell don't have to pay for the OS. ..
 

  
What makes you think they don't pay?    They get OEM pricing.   The rates aren't published but AFAIK its not free. 

Theres exceptions like the promo pricing for tablets:
http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-much-does-microsoft-make-from-p...

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