Ti 84 plus graphing calculator $85 (109.99 -$25 visa checkout -$10 rebate) at staples

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ti 84 graphing calculator is already reduced $10 instant savings=109.99 + $9 tax
use visa checkout to get $25 off $100 offer so around $95
and finally $10 easy rebate around $85 
its a great deal for this calculator

http://www.staples.com/Texas-Instruments-TI-84-Plus-Graphing-Cal...

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I very much hope you're wrong! Imagine if only 0.1% of students became chemists, physicists, accountants, finance majors... (more)

canoeguy1 (Jul. 19, 2016 @ 12:19p) |

I was born and raised outside the US and calculators were not allowed there even in high school - only log tables at the... (more)

amhidogha (Jul. 19, 2016 @ 5:33p) |

Glad I found this thread. TI-84 CE is a better deal from my opinion. I price matched to WalMart for a final price $83 be... (more)

jolapo (Jul. 25, 2016 @ 10:33a) |

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Why does every single other electronic device come down in price and these cost exactly the same as they did 15 years ago when I was in high school?

you can get android phones for practically free these days, and TIs with 30 year old technology still cost $100? wow... talk about a monopoly.

Myers215 said:   Why does every single other electronic device come down in price and these cost exactly the same as they did 15 years ago when I was in high school?
  Well, there is inflation. The same calculator should cost $115 today, so it's still a decent price drop.
Also that the calculator market is pretty much flat. No competition, since demand for these types of calculators is anemic.


Myers215 said:   Why does every single other electronic device come down in price and these cost exactly the same as they did 15 years ago when I was in high school?
  
For the same reason that supposedly every kid in America can't learn math without these. These calculators have nothing to do with education, they have to do with Texas Instruments making  a half a billion dollars a year. They have a monopoly on the graphing calculator industry, so why should they reduce their price. And most of their buyers are schools themselves, which means taxpayer money is paying for it and probably paying full retail price.

Two other things:  1) Most people who learned math 20 years ago without a graphing calculator probably know it better than kids today who use the calculator.  2)  I challenge anyone to name a single thing that the graphing calculator is used for that is useful to 99% of the population in their daily life?

This is not to put down OP's post, this is a great price for the TI calculator because pretty much every school forces you to buy it.


canoeguy1 said:   
Myers215 said:   Why does every single other electronic device come down in price and these cost exactly the same as they did 15 years ago when I was in high school?
  Well, there is inflation. The same calculator should cost $115 today, so it's still a decent price drop.
Also that the calculator market is pretty much flat. No competition, since demand for these types of calculators is anemic.

  
Except TI has done nothing significant to the calculator to make it worth more. Any Android phone is capable of just about anything a TI can do. Now probably a ton easier on a device designed for math, but it isn't like they are in a lab coming up with new math formulas. I was going to say that the only thing they added is a color screen, but I just looked and that hasn't even happened. SMH. How many years are they away from touch screen? 

Most calculators can't communicate wirelessly with other calcs, so teachers probably prefer for the cheating aspect, as I can't see them enjoying the parent complaints on the cost of these, nor would they want to pull out there slim wallets for an overpriced piece of tech. 

you can get a crappy laptop for $100, and your kid will probably learn more. 

let the kids cheat if they want, they will only be putting them selves behind. just like making pot legal. the dumb ones & lazy will naturally get left behind

edit: I guess they make a color screen model, glad they found the 2000's.

any reason for the negative? you like supporting monopoly's. i'd rather give that $100 to the teacher

DeGlass said:   https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat/taking-the-test/calculator-policy
  These exams / tests rules are the only reason other substitutes (phone apps) are not allowed, unless they can find a way to ensure the phones can be made to behave with crippled functionality during exams - a task seems very uphill

What they overlook is even just with these calculators having so much memory are used as a cheat sheet to load up large amounts for formulae and other data/texts

or install an emulator on your phone for free.

Besides the standardized test requirements, consider also the merit of every student and teacher having the same platform across multiple grades and classes. One student/teacher can easily help another learn how to do something. I'm not saying that said platform *should* be the the TI graphing calculators, but inertia helps keep it so.

They are, at least in my experience, very durable and if you power your two decade-old model on, there's a good chance it will work.

Just another point, I had a an exchange student from the Ukraine in my class last year who told me that in her home school, calculators were not allowed to be used ever. Her math skills were phenomenal. If I personally had a high school aged kid, I would make sure that they learned how to do math without a calculator. 

Myers215 said:   Why does every single other electronic device come down in price and these cost exactly the same as they did 15 years ago when I was in high school?
  
My Casio fx-7000G was ~$300 26 years ago! I still have it somewhere... it has some funny Engrish.

exactly,,i bought these for over $100 about 20+ years ago,,,there is something really sinister here....there must be...

I have seen many graphic calculators in Goodwill stores and pawn shops. They sell from $5.00 to $30.00, they were older models but depending on condition you may want to buy a used one instead.

guys. do you not remember that these could get the "snake" game installed on them. that alone made it worth the price.

anorexicwallet said:   guys. do you not remember that these could get the "snake" game installed on them. that alone made it worth the price.
  
bump up to the TI-89 (~2001) and you could have been playing Mario 

jpessin3 said:   Just another point, I had a an exchange student from the Ukraine in my class last year who told me that in her home school, calculators were not allowed to be used ever. Her math skills were phenomenal. If I personally had a high school aged kid, I would make sure that they learned how to do math without a calculator. 
  I'm sure they would be. Now imagine if engineers weren't allowed to use calculators, and had to do excel spreadsheet calculations in their head? Their math skills would be incredible.

Is either scenario very practical? No. You learn basic math very well, but don't have time to concentrate on the new material that you're trying to learn. If you're still doing long division, and square roots by hand, when you're trying to learn calculus and physics, you will either be doing 5 hours of homework a night, or falling behind the class.

You need to know the procedure for doing basic math skills, to understand how it works. Just like you need to know the theory behind calculus. That doesn't mean you need to do this stuff by hand every time.
I doubt that many engineers have done long division by hand in years, but their job performance doesn't suffer because of it. 

Who said that you need to do stuff by hand every time? And who said that an engineer can't use a calculator or a computer? We are talking about high school students, 99.9% of them who are never going to end up using anything except for basic arithmetic and basic algebra in their life.

The key is to learn the basic skills without a calculator. Unfortunately, the calculators are thrown into schools at such a young age that kids never fully learn basic arithmetic, which is the most important math that you need in life. As much as knowing how to do a linear regression on your graphing calculator is neat, it is worthless to the general population in real life. On the other hand, being able to estimate in your head the approximate cost of your groceries is a skill that is important to every member of the public. (unless you want to trust that your supermarket never makes a mistake.)

An excellent book for reading is "The Math Myth" by Andrew Hacker, a professor at Queens College in New York.

Anyway, I still think the price is too expensive.

Regarding OP. I thing 25% back in rewards in-store would be better using your rewards to reduce tax and (yes 25% rewards also) but the $100 minimum is not required.

BTW, just realized this is the older model. The TI-84 Plus is from 2004. It's not even a Silver Edition.

The TI 84 CE is $109 also after $15 easy rebate and $5 instant rebate.
TI-84 CE  

seems like a good deal w/ visa checkout or maybe kiosk order using 25% rewards back ($124-31 rewards back= 93 -15 visa=$78   or $124-25 visa check out = $99 - $4.95 rewards back for Premier members = $94.05- $15 visa= 79.05 and don't forget to go through ebates for an extra 2% back)

jpessin3 said:   Who said that you need to do stuff by hand every time? And who said that an engineer can't use a calculator or a computer? We are talking about high school students, 99.9% of them who are never going to end up using anything except for basic arithmetic and basic algebra in their life.

The key is to learn the basic skills without a calculator. Unfortunately, the calculators are thrown into schools at such a young age that kids never fully learn basic arithmetic, which is the most important math that you need in life. As much as knowing how to do a linear regression on your graphing calculator is neat, it is worthless to the general population in real life. On the other hand, being able to estimate in your head the approximate cost of your groceries is a skill that is important to every member of the public. (unless you want to trust that your supermarket never makes a mistake.)

An excellent book for reading is "The Math Myth" by Andrew Hacker, a professor at Queens College in New York.

  I very much hope you're wrong! Imagine if only 0.1% of students became chemists, physicists, accountants, finance majors or engineers? What if nobody understood statistics, could do software programming, or could work on computer modelling? We'd be back in the 1700's.

At least half of students need advanced skills. Really anyone who wants to get a college degree, and needs to pass standardized testing, needs them.

Grade school and Middle school is where kids should be doing math homework without calculators. Not High school! If you can't add up your groceries before Grade 10, your schooling has serious deficiencies.
By then they absolutely need to have mastered basic skills if they want to have any chance at a college degree that leads to a well-paying job 

jpessin3 said:   Just another point, I had a an exchange student from the Ukraine in my class last year who told me that in her home school, calculators were not allowed to be used ever. Her math skills were phenomenal. If I personally had a high school aged kid, I would make sure that they learned how to do math without a calculator. 
 I was born and raised outside the US and calculators were not allowed there even in high school - only log tables at the most. Even during engineering, only basic basic scientific calculators, no graphing and/or programmable ones. That makes your understanding and use of math so strong! To use a calculator was sort of a taboo!

My dad had then bought me the top-of-the-line Casio FX-9700G (with a printer, cassette interface)  that I became adept at at programming, but nonetheless could not use it for the exams. Still have it here with me in mint condition after all these years. Had rigged it with an external 9V battery instead of the three 3V coin batteries. BTW, TI calculators seem to be popular (or more of a monopoly) in the US, elsewhere it's Casio or others.
 

wwinters said:   The TI 84 CE is $109 also after $15 easy rebate and $5 instant rebate.
TI-84 CE  

seems like a good deal w/ visa checkout or maybe kiosk order using 25% rewards back ($124-31 rewards back= 93 -15 visa=$78   or $124-25 visa check out = $99 - $4.95 rewards back for Premier members = $94.05- $15 visa= 79.05 and don't forget to go through ebates for an extra 2% back)

  Glad I found this thread. TI-84 CE is a better deal from my opinion. I price matched to WalMart for a final price $83 before $15 ESR, and then used my discounted Staples gc.



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