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HP 510-p024 Pavilion Desktop: I7-6700T, 8GB DDR4, 2TB HDD
$489.99 w/ VISA Checkout
http://www.bestbuy.com/site/hp-pavilion-desktop-intel-core-i7-8gb-memory-2tb-hard-drive-hp-finish-in-twinkle-black/5481602.p?id=bb5481602&skuId=5481602

Work or game at incredible speeds with this HP Pavilion desktop, featuring a 6th generation Intel Core i7 processor to keep up with your computing demands. DDR4 RAM lets you multitask across several windows without slowing down, and this HP Pavilion desktop comes with Windows 10 Home for immediate startup.

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HP 510-p024 Pavilion Desktop: I7-6700T, 8GB DDR4, 2TB HDD
Thanks Neilium
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Pretty nice, good processor

Really nice processor and RAM. You can go far with it.

Integrated graphics capabilities can be compared to video cards from 2010-2011: AMD Radeon HD 7570 or Nvidia GeForce 830A (a mobile processor typically used for All-in-one PCs). This is definitely not a computer you want to attempt to play any recent games on. You could get away with non-intensive games like The Sims 4 or Age of Empires III. You will not be able to play Star Citizen, that's for sure. 

Not a bad PC. I recommend purchasing a video card and SSD to boost it's speed and give it an edge for PC gaming. Give this chart a look for graphics cards that have good value for their price. 

Great product, very fast it helps when writing estimate for my customers and not waiting for it to load to other screens.

Great product

Himahana said:   Really nice processor and RAM. You can go far with it.

Integrated graphics capabilities can be compared to video cards from 2010-2011: AMD Radeon HD 7570 or Nvidia GeForce 830A (a mobile processor typically used for All-in-one PCs). This is definitely not a computer you want to attempt to play any recent games on. You could get away with non-intensive games like The Sims 4 or Age of Empires III. You will not be able to play Star Citizen, that's for sure. 

Not a bad PC. I recommend purchasing a video card and SSD to boost it's speed and give it an edge for PC gaming. Give this chart a look for graphics cards that have good value for their price. 

  And this is the achilles heel of all these big box PC's. The stuff that ISN'T advertised is usually very poor quality, and the cheapest they can get away with. The power supply is one of those items. They're usually in the 250-280W range, and a non-name brand made in China.

You simply can't run any decent video card with such a PSU, so adding a decent card usually means replacing the PSU. Add another $60-$80 to the cost, and quite a bit of tinkering that many people won't want to do (and will probably void your warranty!)

Even worse, the connection between the motherboard and PSU may be proprietary, as in many Dell's, and the PSU form factor may be non-standard. 

Unless you know for sure that you're able to change the PSU, I wouldn't buy this computer with gaming in mind.

Which brings me to my final point: Why pay out the wazoo for an i7 if you're not gaming? No home-use app can make use of it. You can get an i3 or i5 computer for approx half the price that will work just as well for surfing the net. Spend the extra cash on an SSD!

I just bought one due to my main PC dying (either the CPU or MOBO) -- you cannot add a video card to this PC without removing the DVD burner. I think you may be able to replace the PSU, but no point. I would rather buy an all-in-one or a laptop versus this - since you are stuck with onboard graphics anyway.

Its pretty hard to find an I5 in the range of this if you are just surfing. Be aware that its not got a ton of USB but it DOES have Bluetooth which is uncommon at this price. FWIW the CPU in this machine is $300 by itself, so I thought I could make it work but I am going to have to take it back. My Video card cost more than this box and it won't fit, and the VR headset needs that card.

Its going to cost me more to replace the components in my old deck, but I know they will work.

I got a used Acer  i5 3rd gen with 8 GB, 1 TB HDD, Wifi, Bluetooth and mid-tower case on eBay for $99!! That was just over a month ago, when you could still upgrade the machine to Win 10 for free.
So, I have a fully functional surfing machine with not a scratch on it for just over a hundred bucks with shipping.

That beats this 'deal' by a mile. Big box  i3 and i5 computers that are coming off-lease are dirt cheap, and perfectly fine for almost any home use except gaming. Just add an SSD and you have a very capable and fast system.
I don't understand why people spend $500 for a machine like this, unless they just don't understand what they really need and just go for a top-of-the-line CPU to be sure.

canoeguy1 said:   
Himahana said:   Really nice processor and RAM. You can go far with it.

Integrated graphics capabilities can be compared to video cards from 2010-2011: AMD Radeon HD 7570 or Nvidia GeForce 830A (a mobile processor typically used for All-in-one PCs). This is definitely not a computer you want to attempt to play any recent games on. You could get away with non-intensive games like The Sims 4 or Age of Empires III. You will not be able to play Star Citizen, that's for sure. 

Not a bad PC. I recommend purchasing a video card and SSD to boost it's speed and give it an edge for PC gaming. Give this chart a look for graphics cards that have good value for their price. 

  And this is the achilles heel of all these big box PC's. The stuff that ISN'T advertised is usually very poor quality, and the cheapest they can get away with. The power supply is one of those items. They're usually in the 250-280W range, and a non-name brand made in China.

You simply can't run any decent video card with such a PSU, so adding a decent card usually means replacing the PSU. Add another $60-$80 to the cost, and quite a bit of tinkering that many people won't want to do (and will probably void your warranty!)

Even worse, the connection between the motherboard and PSU may be proprietary, as in many Dell 's, and the PSU form factor may be non-standard. 

Unless you know for sure that you're able to change the PSU, I wouldn't buy this computer with gaming in mind.

Which brings me to my final point: Why pay out the wazoo for an i7 if you're not gaming? No home-use app can make use of it. You can get an i3 or i5 computer for approx half the price that will work just as well for surfing the net. Spend the extra cash on an SSD!

  You make a good point. I didn't consider the power supply or other components. 

canoeguy1 said:   I got a used Acer  i5 3rd gen with 8 GB, 1 TB HDD, Wifi, Bluetooth and mid-tower case on eBay for $99!! That was just over a month ago, when you could still upgrade the machine to Win 10 for free.
So, I have a fully functional surfing machine with not a scratch on it for just over a hundred bucks with shipping.

That beats this 'deal' by a mile. Big box  i3 and i5 computers that are coming off-lease are dirt cheap, and perfectly fine for almost any home use except gaming. Just add an SSD and you have a very capable and fast system.
I don't understand why people spend $500 for a machine like this, unless they just don't understand what they really need and just go for a top-of-the-line CPU to be sure.

  
Yeah, 3rd generation is pretty cheap.  If you are doing anything beyond web browsing or even have a bigger screen than 2560x1440 then you had better add a video card.  (to be fair most of them have a card, because the onboard was aimed at laptop low res screens)  Not everyone is comfortable with used machines.

The one that died on me was a 3 year old 4th Generation so that is an old platform.

You can't compare a 6th Gen to a 3rd Gen for power and heat management, much less video.  This is a $900 machine for $500 -- its a very good deal for someone that isn't computer comfortable and wants HP support and a new machine with warranty.  If it was expandable I would keep it, but I am not willing to move it to a new case to make it work when I can buy a new MB for $120.  Even if I have to buy a new CPU (if the MB isn't the issue after all) I will keep it as the new one has wifi and BT4.0 integrated and its also a microATX so I can eventually change to a smaller form case.  Its a hobby to me, the HP was an attempt to not have to wait on shipping times that I lost.

To put it in plainer terms:  CPU $299 (same one as in this), cooler $20, cheapest MB with these features is $90, 2TB drive $80, RAM $35, DVD slimline burner $80  (its a burner and those are not cheap), case $50, OS $100 -- that is what a similar machine would cost to build.  Its cheaper than its PARTS.  I know it sounds backwards to defend the price when I am returning it - but for many people its a very solid PC.  However I think you might as well buy a laptop given the lack of expansion capability, similar pricing on clearance machines at Staples.  (its easier to find clearance high end laptops versus desktops)  

The HP 510-p024 has a 180-watt power supply according to HP. As long as it's a standard size power supply, upgrading should be easy. If the power supply is proprietary, that's a whole new ball game.

Specs:

http://support.hp.com/in-en/document/c05221017

RedWolfe01 said:   
canoeguy1 said:   I got a used Acer  i5 3rd gen with 8 GB, 1 TB HDD, Wifi, Bluetooth and mid-tower case on eBay for $99!! That was just over a month ago, when you could still upgrade the machine to Win 10 for free.
So, I have a fully functional surfing machine with not a scratch on it for just over a hundred bucks with shipping.

That beats this 'deal' by a mile. Big box  i3 and i5 computers that are coming off-lease are dirt cheap, and perfectly fine for almost any home use except gaming. Just add an SSD and you have a very capable and fast system.
I don't understand why people spend $500 for a machine like this, unless they just don't understand what they really need and just go for a top-of-the-line CPU to be sure.

  
Yeah, 3rd generation is pretty cheap.  If you are doing anything beyond web browsing or even have a bigger screen than 2560x1440 then you had better add a video card.  (to be fair most of them have a card, because the onboard was aimed at laptop low res screens)  Not everyone is comfortable with used machines.

The one that died on me was a 3 year old 4th Generation so that is an old platform.

You can't compare a 6th Gen to a 3rd Gen for power and heat management, much less video.  This is a $900 machine for $500 -- its a very good deal for someone that isn't computer comfortable and wants HP support and a new machine with warranty.  If it was expandable I would keep it, but I am not willing to move it to a new case to make it work when I can buy a new MB for $120.  Even if I have to buy a new CPU (if the MB isn't the issue after all) I will keep it as the new one has wifi and BT4.0 integrated and its also a microATX so I can eventually change to a smaller form case.  Its a hobby to me, the HP was an attempt to not have to wait on shipping times that I lost.

To put it in plainer terms:  CPU $299 (same one as in this), cooler $20, cheapest MB with these features is $90, 2TB drive $80, RAM $35, DVD slimline burner $80  (its a burner and those are not cheap), case $50, OS $100 -- that is what a similar machine would cost to build.  Its cheaper than its PARTS.  I know it sounds backwards to defend the price when I am returning it - but for many people its a very solid PC.  However I think you might as well buy a laptop given the lack of expansion capability, similar pricing on clearance machines at Staples.  (its easier to find clearance high end laptops versus desktops)  

  A couple of thoughts:
1) Off on a tangent a bit: How do you know that your MB or CPU are the root cause of your computer's problems? Unless you're overclocking your CPU to its smoking limit, electronic components like that rarely die, particularly if they've been running for years. ie they die straightaway, or never (unless the caps go bad, and you can visually check for that).
 I would suspect that your PSU may be the issue. A failing PSU can take other parts of your computer with it. You could end up killing a brand new MB and CPU if you reuse the old PSU.
This is why I only buy a top-of-the-line PSU brand, like Seasonic, when building an expensive system. The extra $20-$30 is absolutely worth it.

2) Heat and power management improvements are maybe on the order of 20-30% or so between 3rd and 6th gen. For a laptop, this is significant. For a desktop, it's completely immaterial, particularly since the computer is idling much of the time. It's not worth spending even $50 extra, never mind $300+ extra.

3) A 3-year old desktop is not 'old'! A decade ago, PC's were obsolete in 3 years. Those days are long gone. I still use an 8 year old Pentium PC for internet surfing and Microsoft Office, and with an SSD it's almost as fast as a 3rd gen i5. 
The difference between 3rd gen and 6 gen in terms of speed cannot even be measured for web surfing, looking at pictures/video, or Office use.
For gaming, the  performance improvement (25% or so) might be noticeable, but ONLY if the CPU is the bottleneck. Usually the video card is, not the CPU.

What other home-use app would benefit from the improvements between 3rd and 6th gen? I can't think of any.
 

blueribb said:   The HP 510-p024 has a 180-watt power supply according to HP. As long as it's a standard size power supply, upgrading should be easy. If the power supply is proprietary, that's a whole new ball game.

Specs:

http://support.hp.com/in-en/document/c05221017

  That's actually incredibly bad specs. I've rarely heard of any PSU below 230W in a desktop. I guess they're exploiting the low-power requirements of the newest generation of CPU to it's max and completely cheaping out on the PSU.
I don't think you could add any video card at all to this system, even low-power ones, without risking PSU failure (which would likely turn your new computer into a doorstop, and probably also void your warranty).
 

canoeguy1 said:   
blueribb said:   The HP 510-p024 has a 180-watt power supply according to HP. As long as it's a standard size power supply, upgrading should be easy. If the power supply is proprietary, that's a whole new ball game.

Specs:

http://support.hp.com/in-en/document/c05221017

  That's actually incredibly bad specs. I've rarely heard of any PSU below 230W in a desktop. I guess they're exploiting the low-power requirements of the newest generation of CPU to it's max and completely cheaping out on the PSU.
I don't think you could add any video card at all to this system, even low-power ones, without risking PSU failure (which would likely turn your new computer into a doorstop, and probably also void your warranty).


The i3 and maybe the i5 version by HP actually has a 180-watt external power supply. For comparison, the older Dell Inspiron 660's and such always used a standard 300-watt power supply.

canoeguy1 said:   
RedWolfe01 said:   
canoeguy1 said:   I got a used Acer  i5 3rd gen with 8 GB, 1 TB HDD, Wifi, Bluetooth and mid-tower case on eBay for $99!! That was just over a month ago, when you could still upgrade the machine to Win 10 for free.
So, I have a fully functional surfing machine with not a scratch on it for just over a hundred bucks with shipping.

That beats this 'deal' by a mile. Big box  i3 and i5 computers that are coming off-lease are dirt cheap, and perfectly fine for almost any home use except gaming. Just add an SSD and you have a very capable and fast system.
I don't understand why people spend $500 for a machine like this, unless they just don't understand what they really need and just go for a top-of-the-line CPU to be sure.

  
Yeah, 3rd generation is pretty cheap.  If you are doing anything beyond web browsing or even have a bigger screen than 2560x1440 then you had better add a video card.  (to be fair most of them have a card, because the onboard was aimed at laptop low res screens)  Not everyone is comfortable with used machines.

The one that died on me was a 3 year old 4th Generation so that is an old platform.

You can't compare a 6th Gen to a 3rd Gen for power and heat management, much less video.  This is a $900 machine for $500 -- its a very good deal for someone that isn't computer comfortable and wants HP support and a new machine with warranty.  If it was expandable I would keep it, but I am not willing to move it to a new case to make it work when I can buy a new MB for $120.  Even if I have to buy a new CPU (if the MB isn't the issue after all) I will keep it as the new one has wifi and BT4.0 integrated and its also a microATX so I can eventually change to a smaller form case.  Its a hobby to me, the HP was an attempt to not have to wait on shipping times that I lost.

To put it in plainer terms:  CPU $299 (same one as in this), cooler $20, cheapest MB with these features is $90, 2TB drive $80, RAM $35, DVD slimline burner $80  (its a burner and those are not cheap), case $50, OS $100 -- that is what a similar machine would cost to build.  Its cheaper than its PARTS.  I know it sounds backwards to defend the price when I am returning it - but for many people its a very solid PC.  However I think you might as well buy a laptop given the lack of expansion capability, similar pricing on clearance machines at Staples.  (its easier to find clearance high end laptops versus desktops)  

  A couple of thoughts:
1) Off on a tangent a bit: How do you know that your MB or CPU are the root cause of your computer's problems? Unless you're overclocking your CPU to its smoking limit, electronic components like that rarely die, particularly if they've been running for years. ie they die straightaway, or never (unless the caps go bad, and you can visually check for that).
 I would suspect that your PSU may be the issue. A failing PSU can take other parts of your computer with it. You could end up killing a brand new MB and CPU if you reuse the old PSU.
This is why I only buy a top-of-the-line PSU brand, like Seasonic, when building an expensive system. The extra $20-$30 is absolutely worth it.

2) Heat and power management improvements are maybe on the order of 20-30% or so between 3rd and 6th gen. For a laptop, this is significant. For a desktop, it's completely immaterial, particularly since the computer is idling much of the time. It's not worth spending even $50 extra, never mind $300+ extra.

3) A 3-year old desktop is not 'old'! A decade ago, PC's were obsolete in 3 years. Those days are long gone. I still use an 8 year old Pentium PC for internet surfing and Microsoft Office, and with an SSD it's almost as fast as a 3rd gen i5. 
The difference between 3rd gen and 6 gen in terms of speed cannot even be measured for web surfing, looking at pictures/video, or Office use.
For gaming, the  performance improvement (25% or so) might be noticeable, but ONLY if the CPU is the bottleneck. Usually the video card is, not the CPU.

What other home-use app would benefit from the improvements between 3rd and 6th gen? I can't think of any.

  
1) I breadboarded it and tested it with 2 different PSU.  (the second one I bought locally, and returned since It wasn't the issue -- I thought it was likely the PSU myself)  My PSU was replaced about 6 months ago when I rebuilt my rig for heat issues and wanted less cables so went modular.   Both the old supply and the new modular were upper tier Corsair's -- I agree with you on cheap supplies.  I use the auto-overclock built into the system.  (my overheating issue was GPU, and I finally switched from ATI to NVidia - ATI really didn't like Witcher 3 at all)  The issue ended up being the MB, BTW.  I have an A+ and have done IT hardware support before between better jobs.

2) how much heat is a problem is dependent on your case and cooling.  Also the onboard video between 3rd and 6th Gen is pretty significant.  One is 4K capable...  the other one barely can do Full HD.  (at the same refresh)  Again, you are comparing a used to a new PC, so just pure $$$ factor isn't the only concern.  In the range of $500 and less a LOT of people would rather have the new one.  

3) 3 years old for the 4th gen I was talking about.  3rd gen would possibly be older.  (it was introduced in 2012 if it was Ivy Bridge)  I believe that 4th Gen was when DDR3 was introduced, as well.  (which was when they moved to the 1150 pin package)  Minor issues but they all add up.  

Then again I am an "enthusiast" who spent $100 to replace a power supply just to have a lot less cables.  (the old one is still in storage against future needs, I am just not in the same state at the moment and have no access anything other than Best Buy -- no Fry's or Microcenters here.

Anyway, a new Gigabyte Mini-ITX board and a new cooler and its all working.  I need to take it back apart and work on the cable routing, but it booted fine.  First time I have used a mini format board, it looks funny inside the tower.
---

RE crappy PS:

I sorta planned on replacing the power supply anyway, I expected that the stock one would not have the 6+8 power lead needed -- but having to completely rebuild it into another case was more than I was willing to do.   It did look like a standard PSU in size.

This isn't a box designed for any upgrades anyway.  The Burner completely blocks everything, its directly above the MB.  Given that the small PSU almost make sense, might as well use less power too.   I suspect they use this exact same MB in other case layouts where you can do more.

For anyone having power issues, ensure that the red slider by the power jack on the computer is on 115. I had the same issues as others with this not turning on. The power supply was set for European voltage instead of the 115 Volts that is used in the U.S.

ok what?

First this processor is the lower end 6700 processor..

there is the T the plain 6700 and the 6700k .. the K is the fast one
the the PassMark Score on this is pretty sad

http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu.php?cpu=Intel+Core+i7-6700T+%40+... 


Second it has 8g ram .. i am guessing its filling 2 banks with 4g so if you want to upgrade to a more useable 16gb for the 6th gen chips it means tossing what you get and buying new... so you are looking at $70 on ram

The 2TB drive is basically a throw away.. what can you do with it today?

A 5TB segate costs $100

so you are adding $170 out of box to get started

Windows 10 Home is great for some people but a lot of people are going to want Pro or Win7 Pro

If you are one of them add another $100

As others have said expansion is not easy

and its going to be $499 for most people.... not using visa checkout...

this is an ok computer

but because of its under powered processor, small drive, less ram, proprietary hardware


I see no mouse or Keyboard listed so add another $40 for generic wireless M/KB


I got to say this is not a great deal.. not even close to a reasonable deal.. its not a full on suck deal but for a lot of people they are going to be getting less than they should for the money....

Most likely you are going to have

$500 Initial purchase
$ 40 Keyboard Mouse
$ 70 Ram
$120 5TB drive

$730 Starting

and that is a reasonable computer today...

the specs I suggest are not gaming specs
they are basic specs for a general use home computer.

If you sold the 2tb drive and ram you could pay for the 5 Hard Drive maybe

That is my perspective as someone seriously looking for a 6gen system for general home use not gaming just a bit of photoshop and video processing.

I personally wouldn't get it

if you're someone that is considering it..
I think the pricepoint should be about $395 to $425 for this system if they are marketing it as on sale.. normal price I would say $500 would be max on normal price for someone willing to be screwed because they need it immediately but ....


Computer specs are not following through .. this should be considered INFLATION.. when they give you a 2tb drive they know will need replacement or an addon in a short period of time.. when they give you 8gb ram and processors at this level need 16 and gamers need 32.. .. when I don't see a keyboard or mouse? and they probably pay less than $5 for them at wholesale.. basically throw them in just because they have so many blocking the warehouse...

nah.. this is another way around inflation.. its like giving you half sized loafs of bread .. charging you 10 cents less and calling it a sale... nah sorry.. not out to make china rich with a bad initial purchase that I try to fix with many more patch work purchases...

The deal is still on. Why is this in the expired section?

A K model CPU is an "Enthusiast" unlocked clock part. There is absolutely no reason for 99% of users to use one. Without a MB with overclocking ability its going to run stock anyway. Its hardly an "underpowered" processor. Except for "extreme" and "enthusiast" parts this is about the fastest consumer grade processor on the market. It also has decent (for Integrated) graphics.

This PC has a single DDR4 module slotted and one empty slot. It has a wired keyboard and mouse like every other HP desktop. (I have one that is going back)

Can you tell me where I can sell a 2TB drive for enough to buy a 5TB drive AND RAM sticks?

---
2TB is too small for you? Really? I haven't filled the 1TB SSD drive I have and that is my gaming machine with at least 20+ installed games, some of which are huge. Unless you are ripping movies or DLing pirated ones you don't need 5TB drives.

If you are the type to want discrete graphics then no, its not the PC for you. It was a good deal for what it was, and who it was built for. i7s are usually quite a bit more than this -- $500 is the price range for i3/i5s.



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