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TCL 55" 4k Ultra HD 2160p 120Hz Roku Smart LED TV - Black (55US5800)
$386.99 in-store p/u
http://www.target.com/p/tcl-55-4k-ultra-hd-2160p-120hz-roku-smart-led-tv-black-55us5800/-/A-50480469

55" TCL 55US5800 4k Ultra HD Roku Smart LED HDTV on sale for $386.99 after 10% Off discount when you select free store pickup (price reflected in cart).

More deals in the official Target clearance thread.
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rated:
Does an enhanced remote work with this model?

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I jumped on this yesterday and picked it up from my local Target to replace a 32" Vizio that is just too small for our current room (we moved - and I can't setup my projector in this space).

I was iffy on if I needed a 4K at this point, as my HTPC (one of two main sources) doesn't support it yet through the video card.
Roku has some 4K content - if you have a Roku 4... so if you are going to try out the 4K, having the Roku built-in is really a must since it is native to the TV (and you can just use ARC to return the audio back through the receiver).

In most respects, at < $400 this is a great TV, but there is one huge flaw that will most likely see me returning this over the next couple of weeks (and hopefully find another deal).

The issue is with the refresh rate and the "Soap Opera effect." The TV is advertised at 120Hz, but technically it native 60Hz and only achieves 120Hz through generated frames using what they call ClearMotion (effective 120Hz). Because it is native 60Hz, you would *think* that you wouldn't get the "soap opera effect." And, indeed it is still relatively minor (akin to my Vizio's "motion smoothing" on the lowest settings - but not off). However, there is no way to control this "ClearMotion" option - it can't be turned off. It seemingly just intelligently decides how to insert them.
Again, it seems to do a pretty good job with this, but if you are very sensitive to the motion smoothing (as I am), this isn't the TV for you.

Stick with 60Hz, or ensure that the model you are getting allows the motion smoothing (and any other post-processing options) to be disabled entirely.

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Why can't they say it's 60Hz, fudged up to 120Hz or something?  It's amazing that you can't force it to drop to native mode. I really don't like the games.

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BenH said:   I jumped on this yesterday and picked it up from my local Target to replace a 32" Vizio that is just too small for our current room (we moved - and I can't setup my projector in this space).

I was iffy on if I needed a 4K at this point, as my HTPC (one of two main sources) doesn't support it yet through the video card.
Roku has some 4K content - if you have a Roku 4... so if you are going to try out the 4K, having the Roku built-in is really a must since it is native to the TV (and you can just use ARC to return the audio back through the receiver).

In most respects, at < $400 this is a great TV, but there is one huge flaw that will most likely see me returning this over the next couple of weeks (and hopefully find another deal).

The issue is with the refresh rate and the "Soap Opera effect." The TV is advertised at 120Hz, but technically it native 60Hz and only achieves 120Hz through generated frames using what they call ClearMotion (effective 120Hz). Because it is native 60Hz, you would *think* that you wouldn't get the "soap opera effect." And, indeed it is still relatively minor (akin to my Vizio's "motion smoothing" on the lowest settings - but not off). However, there is no way to control this "ClearMotion" option - it can't be turned off. It seemingly just intelligently decides how to insert them.
Again, it seems to do a pretty good job with this, but if you are very sensitive to the motion smoothing (as I am), this isn't the TV for you.

Stick with 60Hz, or ensure that the model you are getting allows the motion smoothing (and any other post-processing options) to be disabled entirely.

   
owners of the site don't like you

JK Target doesn't have an affiliate program, JK they do; but because of you I just refrained from buying one

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tinkleondabeach said:   
BenH said:   I jumped on this yesterday and picked it up from my local Target to replace a 32" Vizio that is just too small for our current room (we moved - and I can't setup my projector in this space).

I was iffy on if I needed a 4K at this point, as my HTPC (one of two main sources) doesn't support it yet through the video card.
Roku has some 4K content - if you have a Roku 4... so if you are going to try out the 4K, having the Roku built-in is really a must since it is native to the TV (and you can just use ARC to return the audio back through the receiver).

In most respects, at < $400 this is a great TV, but there is one huge flaw that will most likely see me returning this over the next couple of weeks (and hopefully find another deal).

The issue is with the refresh rate and the "Soap Opera effect." The TV is advertised at 120Hz, but technically it native 60Hz and only achieves 120Hz through generated frames using what they call ClearMotion (effective 120Hz). Because it is native 60Hz, you would *think* that you wouldn't get the "soap opera effect." And, indeed it is still relatively minor (akin to my Vizio's "motion smoothing" on the lowest settings - but not off). However, there is no way to control this "ClearMotion" option - it can't be turned off. It seemingly just intelligently decides how to insert them.
Again, it seems to do a pretty good job with this, but if you are very sensitive to the motion smoothing (as I am), this isn't the TV for you.

Stick with 60Hz, or ensure that the model you are getting allows the motion smoothing (and any other post-processing options) to be disabled entirely.

   
owners of the site don't like you

JK Target doesn't have an affiliate program, JK they do; but because of you I just refrained from buying one

Could you please write in plain, simple language what you meant to say? Thanks. 

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So did anyone else end up buying this TV? Or owns one (or a similar TCL) from before?

After another day with it, and my wife saying she can't notice the soap-opera effect (which she also definitely knows what it is, but is slightly less sensitive to it than I am) - I was reconsidering keeping it. I was going to hook up my other TV side by side and set its motion smoothing to different levels to see how the TCL compares.

However, today I just noticed some semi-circular banding emanating from the bottom of the screen. I have a feeling it is the backlight arrays or something inside the unit but unless you are staring at the TV head-on and eye-level I am able to tell these things are there.
I'm not sure if I got a bad unit or this is how the model is - so if anyone else has one let me know and I can be more specific how to detect these lines.

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I've got a similar model from WalMart https://www.walmart.com/ip/55-TCL-4K-UHD-Roku-Smart-LED-TV/53320694 for $50 more. I absolutely love it. The inclusion of RokuTV makes other Smart TVs, Dumb TVs. What I like the most is the seamless integration between the TV tuner/HDTV OTA channels and the Internet Apps/Channels. I play XBOX 360 on it, watch OTA channels, IPTV, and some Roku Apps like Smithsonian TV.

According to http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/comparison/8f985732 there is not much difference between TCL 55US57 (WalMart ) and TCL 55US5800 (Target ).

BTW, I also own a 6 years old 40" TCL LED TV and it's going strong.

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Most TVs with the soap opera effect have a way to turn it off.

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cuil said:   I've got a similar model from WalMart https://www.walmart.com/ip/55-TCL-4K-UHD-Roku-Smart-LED-TV/53320694 for $50 more. I absolutely love it. The inclusion of RokuTV makes other Smart TVs, Dumb TVs. What I like the most is the seamless integration between the TV tuner/HDTV OTA channels and the Internet Apps/Channels. I play XBOX 360 on it, watch OTA channels, IPTV, and some Roku Apps like Smithsonian TV.

According to http://www.displayspecifications.com/en/comparison/8f985732 there is not much difference between TCL 55US57 (WalMart ) and TCL 55US5800 (Target ).

BTW, I also own a 6 years old 40" TCL LED TV and it's going strong.


And you don't notice any of this semicircular banding emanating from the bottom of the screen going up about 6-8 inches?
I notice it easiest when I'm standing above the TV looking down (like if you were standing up playing Wii), and it can also be noticed when viewing from an angle (say 50 degrees off center like from a side couch). 
I plan to call TCL tech support to see if they have any idea what I am seeing or if they say "oh no it shouldn't do that" - even if they say that though I have a feeling they would just be blowing smoke and a replacement would do the same.  I suppose it is possible I got a bad one, but I have a feeling this is a flaw of the model.

Again, when watching head on at eye level this is hardly noticeable - even if you are trying to find it, but there are multiple angles from which a set will be viewed over time, and I'm not sure I should keep it when my eye will always be drawn to this now that I know it is there.
 

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Stubtify said:   Most TVs with the soap opera effect have a way to turn it off.
  
Most <> All

I agree it is ridiculous for them to not offer an option.  My mid-end Vizio not only has on/off but 2 distinct settings with multiple levels to control this.
The problem with the TCL is they try to dumb down the smart interface as much as possible so there aren't a lot of settings to control, even in the advanced.
You basically have brightness, hue, contrast, and the various color saturations.  As above, I plan to call their tech support and ask them this question.

I think they kind of decided: Well we aren't really 120, we just use Clearmotion, so because it won't produce a blatant soap opera effect we won't even bother the ability to turn it off.
I have a feeling this "clearmotion" tech is so tightly tied up with their whole display algorithm that turning it off would produce poor quality picture all around.

Again - as a < $400 TV it is still nice with all these issues - I just feel I should either pay a bit more for something better, or less for a dumb 60hz model that doesn't try to fool you.

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head on (142.61kB)
Disclaimer
Here are some pics that show the issue.

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I bought a 4k tv last year, and barely notice a difference vs 1080p. Everything I have read says HDR will be more noticable than 4k, so I will not buy another TV unless it is HDR compatable. Besides missing HDR, this is a decent deal, but I'll pass.

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Download the " Target KidsWish" app for Target and get a 10% off coupon that stacks with the 10% store pickup promo.

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I think they kind of decided: Well we aren't really 120, we just use Clearmotion, so because it won't produce a blatant soap opera effect we won't even bother the ability to turn it off.
I have a feeling this "clearmotion" tech is so tightly tied up with their whole display algorithm that turning it off would produce poor quality picture all around.  


Don't confuse 120Hz for soap opera effect. i just recently learned that doubling the refresh frequency is also used to improve color depth. That is, if you have 7-bit native color LCD, by blinking appropriately the pixels you can bring that to 8-bit color. Prepare to see more of that with HDR TVs, because 10-bit-native LCD panels are not something affordable, so as cost-control measure manufacturers will be using time and spacial dithering to raise the extra 2 bits. Even Samsung had to admit last year they "made a mistake" about high-end TV by claiming it's 10-bit native when the panel is in fact 8-bit. Frequencies beyond 60Hz are not perceivable by the human eye anyway (point can be made >30Hz are not).

   

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EnTerr said:   
I think they kind of decided: Well we aren't really 120, we just use Clearmotion, so because it won't produce a blatant soap opera effect we won't even bother the ability to turn it off.
I have a feeling this "clearmotion" tech is so tightly tied up with their whole display algorithm that turning it off would produce poor quality picture all around.  


Don't confuse 120Hz for soap opera effect. i just recently learned that doubling the refresh frequency is also used to improve color depth. That is, if you have 7-bit native color LCD, by blinking appropriately the pixels you can bring that to 8-bit color. Prepare to see more of that with HDR TVs, because 10-bit-native LCD panels are not something affordable, so as cost-control measure manufacturers will be using time and spacial dithering to raise the extra 2 bits. Even Samsung had to admit last year they "made a mistake" about high-end TV by claiming it's 10-bit native when the panel is in fact 8-bit. Frequencies beyond 60Hz are not perceivable by the human eye anyway (point can be made >30Hz are not).

   

  
Yes - I realize they are not the same (I posted some more info on another forum, but didn't go into as much detail here due to just discussing the nature of the "deal").
Fact is though, I have never seen a pure 60Hz TV display any sort of soap opera effect.

Seems the manufacturers only correlate their various motion smoothing technologies with the same technologies that are used at rates 120Hz or above - whether those are true native 120Hz, or 60Hz trying to simulate higher using things like this "ClearMotion"

No one ever talked about the SOE before 120Hz came out.  Additionally, just because I turn off the "motion smoothing" on my Vizio doesn't make it into a 60Hz native TV - it is still 120Hz.
So, you're correct in theory - but for most intents and purposes you only need to worry about SOE at *effective* 120Hz and above.  To my knowledge no manufacturer has incorporated a processing filter into 60Hz sets that cause it.

And as far as not being able to see past 30Hz, that's what they say - but optics is a very difficult science to prove, and many people can tell up to and sometimes past 60Hz.  Even if you can't tell, there are fatigue symptoms and other artifacts that I do believe can contribute to speeds above 60Hz still having some merit.

TBH, I'm very on the fence between just buying a solid 60Hz 1080p TV instead of +60Hz 4K because at this juncture I just don't see much of a difference and the content isn't really there yet anyway.
But, it is tough to even find the 1080p sets at a price that's really much lower than the 4K.

Until HDR becomes true HDR and affordable on most sets, and the content catches up, it just doesn't seem like analyzing them much beyond commodities, especially in the budget range.
 

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