3TB Hitachi Ultrastar 7K4000 HUS724030ALE641 64MB Cache Internal HDD (Refurbished) $47.20 at ebay.com

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3TB Hitachi Ultrastar 7K4000 HUS724030ALE641 64MB Cache Internal HDD (Refurbished) $47.20 at ebay.com
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3TB Hitachi Ultrastar 7K4000 HUS724030ALE641 64MB Cache Internal HDD (Refurbished)
$47.20
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hitachi-Ultrastar-7K4000-HUS724030ALE641-3TB-64MB-cache-Internal-Hard-Drive-/272404141771

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This drive is one of the more reliable Hard drives out in the market now. I had no issues with a few I have for the last few years. Most of these drives have a date of 2013, before or after the Thailand flood a few years back?

A refurbished hard drive! Talk about your data having one foot in the grave and the other on a banana peel!

I agree with buying a Hitachi Ultrastar, but only new. These are $70 new at Amazon, and worth it.

I found this HDD at Amazon  (the same as the OP and it's selling for $69.95 & FREE Shipping).

This Amazon page says: "Enterprise Internal Hard Drive (Certified Refurbished)"

It is not a new hard drive!

nobody refurbishes hard drives... its just a used drive

The reviews are few. Who can tell me about its details? Does it work well?

tonglu1 said:   I found this HDD at Amazon  (the same as the OP and it's selling for $69.95 & FREE Shipping).

This Amazon page says: "Enterprise Internal Hard Drive (Certified Refurbished)"

It is not a new hard drive!

  
OP's title clearly states this is a refurbished drive, and this drive is one of the most reliable drives on the market. I have been waiting for a great deal on this drive! I just bought 9GB for under $150! Wow! Get it while you can! My Plex server is going to love it! 

ganjagadget said:   
tonglu1 said:   I found this HDD at Amazon  (the same as the OP and it's selling for $69.95 & FREE Shipping).

This Amazon page says: "Enterprise Internal Hard Drive (Certified Refurbished)"

It is not a new hard drive!

  
OP's title clearly states this is a refurbished drive, and this drive is one of the most reliable drives on the market. I have been waiting for a great deal on this drive! I just bought 9GB for under $150! Wow! Get it while you can! My Plex server is going to love it! 

  Please re-read the thread - there isn't really such thing as a refurbished hard drive. Hard drives are complex mechanical devices. They WILL wear and they WILL fail. Just a matter of time.

No HDD company refurbishes HDDs once they leave the factory the first time. It would cost more than making a new one.
"refurbished" means either:
(1) it was returned as a failed unit, but tested OK - meaning it is a used HDD that wasn't actually broken (so its just a used HDD), or it is an HDD with an intermittent problem (which is really bad).
(2) it was returned as a failed unit, but it was the electronic card that had problems, so it was repaired by switching the failed card with a used card from a drive with a mechanical failure - meaning it is a used, failed, and repaired-with-used-and-likely-overstressed-parts hard drive (worse yet)
(3) it is just a used hard drive that somebody is calling "refurbished" because people are gullible.

The only thing used HDDs are good for (imho) is as temporary storage devices where data loss won't matter (pretty rare usage case). Other than that, you are just buying a used HDD with a shortened life and potentially putting your data at risk (how good are your backups?). If you do choose to buy a used HDD, first thing you should do is check its SMART statistics to see how many hours it has been run, bad sectors, etc.

HDDs are just one of those things people really shouldn't buy on the used market (along with toilet paper and condoms, to name some more common examples).

 

sumduude said:   nobody refurbishes hard drives... its just a used drive
15- 20 years ago, Western Digital described its refurbishment process as replacing about every mechanical component except the main aluminum casting, and that part was stripped of its internal nonstick coating and a new one applied.  Now their refurbishment process just means rejecting any drive that had run for more than a certain amount of time (they would only say it was less than 25,000 hours) and checking out the remaining drives.  Many resellers reset the log showing the hours, number of start/stop cycles, and number of defects, but some don't do a thorough job, and a diagnostic like GSmartControl may show the actuual information in the SMART log.

OneStepAhead said:   I agree with buying a Hitachi Ultrastar, but only new. These are $70 new at Amazon, and worth it.
  Link?  I only see refurbs at that price.

For such a super reliable drive (According to Backblaze) , why are there so many refurbs?

forbin4040 said:   For such a super reliable drive (According to Backblaze) , why are there so many refurbs?
  
These are Enterprise drives, so they almost certainly were running in a datacenter. In the last couple of years, the big companies have been doing massive rounds of equipment replacement, flooding the market with a lot of used server equipment. When they do this large scale equipment replacement, it's actually more cost effective for them to just send everything to be refurbished than to pick out the stuff that's still working
 

forbin4040 said:   For such a super reliable drive (According to Backblaze) , why are there so many refurbs?
Remember that these are mostly 4 year old drives. Hitachi made many millions of these drives, but they only have about a 5 year life.
In addition to what twalk6 said, Many companies just replace disk drive storage on a regular cycle (rather than waiting for them to actually fail), so lots of used drives are coming on the market that have likely been used hard. Plus the failure rates will have been climbing as they approach the end of service life, so there will be lots more drives that are just worn out/starting to have problems.

If you look at the curve of HDD failures, it looks like a bathtub (which is what we used to call it - the bathtub curve). For a "normal" drive program, drives tend to fail at a high rate (still low single digit %) in the first few weeks after shipment (mfg defects, mostly), then the failure rate drops a lot (near zero) for several years, then it trends back up as the drives reach the end of their design life (3-5 years, depending on type). For a 2013 Enterprise drive program, we should expect the failure rate to start climbing the "back" of the bathtub curve about now.
So, because only the naive buy used hard drives, there will be a lot of them coming on the market waiting to "get" the unsuspecting buyer looking for a "bargain" that likely won't last very long.

One perversity of the disk drive business is that the "bleeding edge" drive of a few years ago (when a 3TB Enterprise drive cost $350+) still looks competitive when sold at a huge discount (like $50 for a used one) against "mainline" drives today (3TB cost about $100) - but current bleeding edge drives still cost $350+ (but now at about 8-10TB, helium filled, etc).

One way to think about it - Suppose you need to buy a car today, but you had to agree that if anything breaks on the car, you have to scrap it and everything in it when it fails. Your choices are (1) a brand new Toyota/Honda/Ford/Chevy (whatever your bias says) or (2) a top of the line 2002 Mercedes or Lexus with 500,000 miles at a price that looks really good compared to the brand new car.
Which car would you buy?

 

Years ago, WD did a lot more "repair/refurb" than most other HDD companies. They were the "bottom feeder" of the industry. Their quality was so bad they had to repair/salvage a lot just to stay in business (they did a LOT of reuse of parts from failed drives). Better companies did some repair, but if build quality was high, the business case to do "deep" repair just didn't pencil out.

Keep in mind that WD problems got so bad at that time that they actually had to license designs in from IBM just to be able to produce a product that would qualify at their key customers (money maker for IBM, almost put WD under). Obviously WD has gotten somewhat better (and they now own the IBM design teams that were sold to Hitachi in 2002). Unfortunately, company culture at WD is "cheaper and don't worry much about quality", so it will be interesting to see how they do now that they are allowed to fully integrate Hitachi operations. From what I hear, they are pushing out lots of Hitachi people who have the bad habit of pushing for quality and reliability - but time will tell.

Luckily for WD, Seagate is also struggling. Seagate was phenomenal back in the day, but when they went private and then IPOd, they made a lot of millionaires in the company who started retiring in droves several years ago, so the "new" management team doesn't have the experience of the "old bulls". Technically, Seagate will probably end up on top again, but they need to "shake out" a bit.

The underdog in all this is Toshiba. They make good drives (to get antitrust approval for the deal, Hitachi had to sell its desktop business to Toshiba when it sold the rest of its operations to WD). Toshiba has been in the business for decades, and has excellent technology (TDK makes 100% of Toshiba's recording heads - and WD and Seagate buy TDK heads for their highest end, most demanding  products). Personally, I have several Toshiba hdds running and I have been very happy with them.

whyme1 said:   This drive is one of the more reliable Hard drives out in the market now. I had no issues with a few I have for the last few years. Most of these drives have a date of 2013, before or after the Thailand flood a few years back?
The flooding in Thailand didn't really affect Hitachi operations. WD and Seagate factories are located near each other north of Bangkok where there was lots of flooding. the Hitachi factories were located south and east of Bangkok (Chon Buri and Prachin Buri).  Hitachi made a LOT of money from the flooding because they were the only major HDD company that wasn't affected (proving once again that it is often better to be lucky...)

yahoot said:   
forbin4040 said:   For such a super reliable drive (According to Backblaze) , why are there so many refurbs?
 For a 2013 Enterprise drive program, we should expect the failure rate to start climbing the "back" of the bathtub curve about now.

Do you have a reference for that? Not challenging you, just curious about published info on how long the "bottom of the bathtub"
actually is for these type drives.
One way to think about it - Suppose you need to buy a car today, but you had to agree that if anything breaks on the car,
you have to scrap it and everything in it when it fails. Your choices are (1) a brand new Toyota/Honda/Ford/Chevy (whatever your
bias says) or (2) a top of the line 2002 Mercedes or Lexus with 500,000 miles at a price that looks really good compared to the
brand new car.
Which car would you buy?

If *anything* breaks?  Easy -- the old one. Little things break on new cars all the time -- the front end of the tub.  Why pay more for that risk?  I see your point, but this is not the best of analogies.
 

ganjagadget said:   
tonglu1 said:   I found this HDD at Amazon  (the same as the OP and it's selling for $69.95 & FREE Shipping).

This Amazon page says: "Enterprise Internal Hard Drive (Certified Refurbished)"

It is not a new hard drive!

  
OP's title clearly states this is a refurbished drive, and this drive is one of the most reliable drives on the market. I have been waiting for a great deal on this drive! I just bought 9GB for under $150! Wow! Get it while you can! My Plex server is going to love it! 

I was not being critical about the OP's post re "Refurbished" drive. Although I didn't quote it, my comments was referring to the one just prior to mine (by OneStepAhead) where a claim was made to the effect that one could buy a brand new drive (same model as OP) at Amazon for $70.

Last year, I bought a few of 2TB Hitachi "refurbished" HDDs for doing my backup/restore operations, and I have been very pleased with them. They are quite reliable for my purpose.
 

OneStepAhead said:   I agree with buying a Hitachi Ultrastar, but only new. These are $70 new at Amazon, and worth it.
 

Please show me where I can I buy a TRULY brand new 3TB Hitachi Ultrastar for $70.  I see some on Amazon for around $70 that are listed as new OEM drives (so no manufacturer's warranty), but based on the reviews the drives appear to have been used -- sometimes with the SMARTS data wiped clean (and sometimes not).  Either way, they only come with the seller's 30-90 day warranty.  So those $70ish drives aren't any different than these $50ish ones.
 

OneStepAhead said:   I agree with buying a Hitachi Ultrastar, but only new. These are $70 new at Amazon, and worth it.
Amazon 's search system for hard drives doesn't work right and lists used drives even if you specify only new drives.  

The cheapest price for a new 3TB HGST UltrasStar with 5-year factory warranty is probably $195, from Fry's, and that's about $50 cheaper than anyone else.  The model Fry's lists for that is the 7K4000, but they often substitute the newer 7K6000.  

 

Perfect time - in for 1.



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