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My landlord is very particular about how I pay rent. She doesn't accept mailed checks. She also doesn't accept any of the new online payment services like Wells Fargo SurePay or Chase QuickPay. Her instructions are that I need to electronically put the money into her account. She provided her bank info and routing/account numbers. Are there any banks that currently let you send money via monthly auto-pay to another person's account via specifying a routing and account number? Both of my current banks (Chase and Wells Fargo) will only mail a physical check, or direct me to SurePay/QuickPay.

Thanks!

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Mail paper check or billpay to her bank payable to:
BANKNAME/LANDLORDNAME/AC:ACCOUNTNUMBER

DWooley (Aug. 08, 2016 @ 12:44p) |

JW10 (Aug. 17, 2016 @ 9:44p) |

I second Ally with PopMoney. You can enter routing/account number and it sends via ACH. $5K/mo limit.

Chill99 (Aug. 17, 2016 @ 11:23p) |

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Almost all of them.  You will probably have to do trial deposits and have the landlord verify the amounts.

I think that's only for sending money between accounts that I own. (It makes me check a box attesting that all accounts are mine.) I'm looking for something that would be classified as "Bill Pay", as opposed to "Transfers".

No autopay to account is subject to restrictions of the Bank Secrecy Act. You will have to manually order the money transfers. Restriction is to prevent "skimming" of rental payments been in place since the 1980's. Since it involves real property you also have some loose ends from FIRREA hanging on also.

If she has a particular system that she has used in the past, and she insists that you use it, but your two banks don't offer the method that she requires, can you ask your landlord to tell you the names of the specific banks (and the names of the payment methods) which have allowed her past/other tenants to pay her in this fashion?

I am not sure this is really legal, but maybe if this is in the contract, you are stuck.

I think clearxchange via Chase/BofA/WF is the best legal P2P way without much hassle. Landlord will need to give you a registered/connected mobile or email.

Otherwise, you can deposit a check (not cash) at the landlord's bank (any branch) using the provided account number.

It is disappointing to see someone makes it so difficult when check deposit via mobile has become so easy.

Rasheed

My bank, Capital (not Capital One) allows me to do this for free. It is like a Bill Pay, but we have given the bank information to the processor so they send it electronically instead of mailing a check. You could also see if she'd expect PaylPal, checking account to checking account.

If the landlord wants a special payment system, then she needs to provide it. Tell the landlord your account info and request she debits it. Of course use a special account loaded only with monthly rent money.

Or use your bank's bill pay. Sure it will send a check, but the first one will have directions for payee to set up electronic payments at their convenience.

Also ask the state/local agency overseeing tenant law and ask what you should do. Not accepting checks would be a landlord violation in many places, especially tenant friendly places like CA NY MA WA etc.

I'd be really leery of setting up something special and if anything goes wrong, it's your problem. Don't let landlord scare you into doing something that is difficult, not customary, not legally required, or could bite you.

NEDeals , you need to stay clear of FIRREA on real estate lease payments. Maybe you are not old enough to remember some of the skimming that went on with rental proceeds in the Lincoln Savings debacle.  Regardless of what the states may say, Bill Pay isn't an approved method of payment yet when a statutory security interest attaches to the rental proceeds of a piece of real estate. Article VI paragraph 2 of the US constitution always supersedes the state law.

nsdp said:   NEDeals , you need to stay clear of FIRREA on real estate lease payments. Maybe you are not old enough to remember some of the skimming that went on with rental proceeds in the Lincoln Savings debacle.  Regardless of what the states may say, Bill Pay isn't an approved method of payment yet when a statutory security interest attaches to the rental proceeds of a piece of real estate. Article VI paragraph 2 of the US constitution always supersedes the state law.
  
FIRREA...really?  Maybe you press a random statue button, powered by javascript.    Hint: It's fine.  Bill pay today is another term for sending a check in the mail, or making an ACH payment.  I used bill pay when I was a tenant, no problems, no lawsuits, no Constitutional scholars lurking in the shadows claiming otherwise. 

ps.  "anything in the Constitution or laws of any State to the contrary notwithstanding."

rasheedb said:   It is disappointing to see someone makes it so difficult when check deposit via mobile has become so easy.

Rasheed

  Why would anyone want to deposit a bunch of checks instead of checking the banana stand then kicking back and relaxing?

USAA can do this

NEDeals , you had a bank and landlord willing to play ball and run the legal risks. OP has a landlord who won't waive her rights. When you are down in front of the judge for DUI, you can waive your rights to a trial by jury, to confront the witnesses against you, and other due process rights. One right in a DUI case that a court will not allow you to waive is representation by counsel. The court will appoint you a lawyer whether you like it or not. You may not like it and elect to proceed pro se but the lawyer is still there as "stand by counsel" and that prevents you from suffering "buyers remorse" later and appealing under Gideon vs Wainwright later on. Waiver of constitutional rights in your DUI case is voluntary as your example is a voluntary waiver of banking rules.

Here we have a land lord who won't voluntarily waive her rights. OP has no recourse and you fail to understand the distinction between a voluntary waiver of rights and enforcement of rights.

nsdp said:   NEDeals , you had a bank and landlord willing to play ball and run the legal risks. OP has a landlord who won't waive her rights. When you are down in front of the judge for DUI, you can waive your rights to a trial by jury, to confront the witnesses against you, and other due process rights. One right in a DUI case that a court will not allow you to waive is representation by counsel. The court will appoint you a lawyer whether you like it or not. You may not like it and elect to proceed pro se but the lawyer is still there as "stand by counsel" and that prevents you from suffering "buyers remorse" later and appealing under Gideon vs Wainwright later on. Waiver of constitutional rights in your DUI case is voluntary as your example is a voluntary waiver of banking rules.

Here we have a land lord who won't voluntarily waive her rights. OP has no recourse and you fail to understand the distinction between a voluntary waiver of rights and enforcement of rights.

  

Recourse for what? You are comparing routine paying of rent with a check to DUI criminal cases. LoL. 

myperson1985 said:   My landlord is very particular about how I pay rent. She doesn't accept mailed checks.Put a check in an envelope under/through her door.

NEDeals said:   Not accepting checks would be a landlord violation in many places, especially tenant friendly places like CA NY MA WA etc.The landlord accepts checks, just not by mail.

xoneinax said:   
NEDeals said:   Not accepting checks would be a landlord violation in many places, especially tenant friendly places like CA NY MA WA etc.
The landlord accepts checks, just not by mail.

  
Interesting development.  Earlier the OP said, "[Landlord's instructions] are that I need to electronically put the money into her account."

We have a free savings account with a local bank for this purpose. So far, all tenants are making the deposits through this bank, either transfers from their own accounts at the same bank or using our deposit slips at a branch. Is your landlord's account with a bank that has somewhat convenient branches for you?

Huntington Bank allows ACH billpay to any personal account with routing and account numbers.
They don't operate in every state, and I don't know if they will allow twelve payments to be scheduled a year in advance.
 

What about Bill Pay?
As part of the extra20 routine, I've been pushing money from Alliant to Santander thru ACH, and pushing the money back out thru Santander's billpay using my Alliant a/c# (with the mail banking address as the payee; no routing number needed).

You can easily do this using Ally pop money payment. I was in a similar situation and contacted my banks. Ally works perfectly well.

NEdeals , I apologize; I apparently assumed a level of logic and intelligence beyond your ability. The point is this the landlord has NO LEGAL obligation to accept BillPay or any other electronic form of payment. Neither God nor the federal government allow this requirement to be placed on the landlord. To the extent that California may have law, that is superseded by the enactment of FIRREA based on the facts present in this case, Article VI para 2 of the US Constitution. The federal law is used to prevent the electronic diversion of rental proceeds subject to a first mortgage lien on the rental property and rental proceeds from that property. Is this explanation simple enough for you to understand.

I apologize for giving you credit for having more intelligence than you have.

I do this with my rent checks

I use my bank's online bill-pay to send a physical check to my landlord's bank address.  Check is made out to "Bank Name FBO Landlords Name" (ex: "Chase Bank FBO John Doe").  I put the landlords account number in the memo.  

FBO stands for "for benefit only".  This is commonly done when individuals switch banks for their retirement accounts.  This is so individuals do not have to claim a distribution.
I did a test check for $1 first to make sure it would work.

 Original post edited thank you taxmantoo for catching my mistake.

wire.

nsdp said:   NEdeals , I apologize; I apparently assumed a level of logic and intelligence beyond your ability. The point is this the landlord has NO LEGAL obligation to accept BillPay or any other electronic form of payment. Neither God nor the federal government allow this requirement to be placed on the landlord. To the extent that California may have law, that is superseded by the enactment of FIRREA based on the facts present in this case, Article VI para 2 of the US Constitution. The federal law is used to prevent the electronic diversion of rental proceeds subject to a first mortgage lien on the rental property and rental proceeds from that property. Is this explanation simple enough for you to understand.

I apologize for giving you credit for having more intelligence than you have.

  
When you have to resort to childish ad hominem attacks/fallacies to make your "point," you didn't have much of a point at all. Hint: Re-read the OP and learn the issue being discussed and the landlord is requiring. Your post demonstrates you missed it completely.

grp2c said:   I do this with my rent checks

I use my bank's online bill-pay to send a physical check to my landlord's bank address.  Check is made out to "Bank Name FOB Landlords Name" (ex: "Chase Bank FOB John Doe").  I put the landlords account number in the memo.  

FOB stands for "for benefit only".  This is commonly done when individuals switch banks for their retirement accounts.  This is so individuals do not have to claim a distribution.
I did a test check for $1 first to make sure it would work.

 

  
Actually, FBO means For Benefit Only, FOB means Free On Board.

For example, if something is priced FOB port of entry and comes in through Los Angeles, transportation from Port of Los Angeles to your destination is on you.

Microscoping in even deeper to things that don't matter: FBO is actually "For (the) benefit of"

OP: Please billpay to: Chase Bank, NA FBO DebentureBoy I'll make sure the landlord gets the money

find LL's bank's 'bank by mail' address.

i send mine from my USAA billpay (or plastiq, since i'm doing signup bonuses) to a wells fargo bank by mail address in portland, addressed to the landlord with account # in the address. probably not ideal, but nobody seems to mind. the money gets there.

unfortunately if the landlord does not authorize it, bank by mail is not an option if the property has a federally regulated loan loan on it. That choice is the landlord's not yours. If a landlord requires EFT or SWIFT wire you are stuck.

nsdp said:   unfortunately if the landlord does not authorize it, bank by mail is not an option if the property has a federally regulated loan loan on it. That choice is the landlord's not yours. If a landlord requires EFT or SWIFT wire you are stuck.
  
There is what is the letter of the law, and then there is the way it really works.  The teller processing the autopay checks (which are printed checks generally drawn on a bank and not the individual) isn't going to out-sort potential issues that will then create MORE work if they are wrong and even MORE than that if they are right.  

They swipe the MICR or feed it into a scanner, 10-key the Target account and move on.

Hi. Thanks for the feedback. To clarify, I'm happy to work with my landlord's instructions. I just wanted to know if any banks supports ACH sending to a routing/account number via automated bill pay. (I've previously been cashing a check into my landlord's account by visiting Chase bank in person, and Chase tells me that they don't support another way.) It sounds like USAA, Huntington, Capital (not Capital One), Ally might all be good options. Do you know if any of the big banks (Bank of America, Citi, etc) also permit this?

You can do it with BofA, but they will charge you a $3 fee to do it directly to the bank account.

Alternatively, you can send a payment to a mobile number or email and that is free. The person clicks on the link in the text msg or email and enters their account info and then the funds are deposited into the bank account. I believe the person only has to set up their account info once, though I haven't had a need to use the feature myself.

Actually some banks that use Popmoney do allow you to send money to a specific account and routing number. Suntrust is one bank that I know allows this.

If I were you, I'd contact Popmoney - https://www.popmoney.com/help.html#contact-us and ask them which banks allow customers to use Popmoney to transfer money via only account & routing number.

I just wanted to add that US Bank appears to support ACH (account number and routing) P2P transfers for free when not in a rush.

https://www.usbank.com/online-banking/pay-a-person-faqs.html

The reason why this came up is US Bank has also joined BofA, Capital One, Wells Fargo and Chase as owners in ClearXchange. It wasn't clear to me before, but it definitely appears that this group was specifically designed to bypass any of the existing slow ACH/FedWire/whatever they are called services to transfer money. Any bank or CU can become a member. It is all about instant transfer and eventually, instant payment.

The banks must run some sort of ledger to deal with the money balancing at their level without the need to have a bunch of ACHs buzzing around. Further, with these mega banks, they likely end up processing many transactions in-house (the to/from are in the same bank) with neither party having to know that detail (security).

I stick with my original comment that using a ClearXchange method (phone or email linked) is the best option.  They have a free option for all other bank holders (via ACH) which I think is a game changer, but removes the instant part of this service.

Someone else mentioned Popmoney (which is trying to solve the same problem).  Citi chose that option.  I would consider these as competitors.  I believe US Bank's P2P ACH uses Popmoney while ClearXchange is trying to not use the existing infrastructure while Popmoney appears to be more of an overlay.  It appears member banks don't usually charge fees while the popmoney.com website does.  It appears the ClearXchange website does not charge money (if your bank does not participate in the network).

https://online.citi.com/US/JRS/pands/detail.do?ID=PopMoney
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Popmoney

Rasheed

Think this through

Look at Santander Bank which will do so for no service charge.
Currently has a $150 sign up bonus is you do not have an account with them. Initial deposit can be up to $500 for a checking and additional $500.00 on Savings account on CC. Total possible initial deposit $1000.000 on CC.
At least one DD required and at least one activity per month to avoid fee. Your transfer to your landlord should qualify as an activity.
Third party ACH transfers are possible

Look at Fidelity Investments Cash Management or regular investment account
For example ACH from Fidelity Investments only shows as FID BKG SVC LLC MONEYLINE with a second line which is the Fidelity account number. Their form does indicate you can Electronic Transfer to a third party (ACH)

https://www.fidelity.com/bin-public/060_www_fidelity_com/documents/electronic-funds-transfer-and-bank-wire.pdf
==========================
Now that said, it sounds hinky to me. It involves a TON of trust on both sides. In many cases, the ability to ACH into an account also includes the ability to withdraw funds by ACH as well. There have been many reports of fraud withdrawals when third party thief has your ACH information. Almost no protection for you.
When setting up something like that, READ what you are setting up. Many of the ACH initial setups include a statement that you own the receiving bank account.

I understand she wants funds in a way she has instant or almost instant use of the money. She wants it as close to guaranteed money as she can get.
I worry about how the landlord can tell your payment from that of somebody else if she has more than one rental. My read is that you will not have access to her on line account to be able to verify the payment came in or see how your payment shows up on her account.

POPMONEY is becoming popular at a lot of banks as their alternate to ACH. I have not used it and must defer to those who have.

https://www.popmoney.com/

NEDeals said:   Or use your bank's bill pay. Sure it will send a check, but the first one will have directions for payee to set up electronic payments at their convenience.
 

  I have not seen this. How do you configure bill pay to let it send you an electronic payment versus a check in mail?

Most bank Bill Pay - payout payee registrations will indicate if the payee will be paid by electronic or check in mail upon initial payee registration.

Mail paper check or billpay to her bank payable to:
BANKNAME/LANDLORDNAME/AC:ACCOUNTNUMBER
 


Skipping 1 Messages...
I second Ally with PopMoney. You can enter routing/account number and it sends via ACH. $5K/mo limit.



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