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Well, free plus $5 shipping and handling but the book sells for 5 times that on Amazon
Investing in Justice offer 

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Shill harder.

Crazytree (Aug. 05, 2016 @ 3:49a) |

Never mind, I notice that someone previously linked the article in the Wall Street Journal.  

My take: this funding might... (more)

bighitter (Aug. 05, 2016 @ 8:30p) |

Who would invest in a marginal case though?

acrocabbot (Aug. 06, 2016 @ 9:26a) |

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Hmmm Do they invest in healthcare/ malpractice lawsuits?

What is the typical minimum? state restrictions?

needhelpplease said:   Hmmm Do they invest in healthcare/ malpractice lawsuits?

What is the typical minimum? state restrictions?


They invest in commercial cases, no personal injury.  You can see all the cases on their site but to see the names of the actual cases and to read the court docket you need to be registered. Most of the cases have a $5K minimum investment.  Not aware of any state restrictions.  

90C4 said:   Their resolved cases have averaged a 91% annualized return.  
  Boasting of outrageous returns are hallmarks of investment scams. Tread carefully.

atikovi said:   
90C4 said:   Their resolved cases have averaged a 91% annualized return.  
  Boasting of outrageous returns are hallmarks of investment scams. Tread carefully.

  
Absolutely.  They're tied to Wealthforge as their broker/dealer.  All alternative investments should be carefully investigated but many do have outsized returns, and more risk of course.  And it's always good to diversify.  I used to use Realtyshares for my alternative investments but the returns were about 12% which isn't what I was looking for 

90C4 said:     Their resolved cases have averaged a 91% annualized return.
Investing in Justice offer
 

  
First question I'd ask:
Of total cases, how many have been resolved and how many are unresolved?

I suspect that what they're boasting about means that when they do settle, they've got a pretty positive outcome...   I imagine a law firm could appeal for 5-10 years even after losing - resulting in "unresolved" status...

(Just guessing, 91% average return sounds over the top)

It's a new company and they only have maybe 15 cases so far but the team claims to have been doing litigation finance for I think close to 20 years with a greater than 50% annualized return. Only 2 of their cases have resolved so far.  One of them was 88% and the other did 93%. I know that hedge funds (Burford, Bentham, Lake Whillans) invest in litigation all the time with similar returns so I wasn't surprised.

The sample size seems way too small on their site. I would consider this investment if it was a portfolio, but right now they only show one open case with a minimum $5k investment. The risk on a single case investment is large. If they had a large portfolio to invest in (like P2P loans) then the diversification reduces the overall risk.

I've never heard of this type of investment, but it sounds interesting if we are able to diversify. Right now, it's making a $5k bet on the single athletic association vs. laywers case.

btw - when you submit your info on the site you get this:

WE DON'T YET HAVE ONLINE CREDIT CARD PROCESSING, BUT PLEASE CALL US MONDAY-FRIDAY 9AM-6PM EASTERN WITH YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER

877-290-4443


needhelpplease said:   https://www.lexshares.com/Legal_Finance_Summary_Volsky.pdf
  
That paper's a good quick summary for anyone interested in the topic

Surprised Mike hasn't chimed in yet, since he's made millions off of "investing" in litigation...

ETA: Oh, probably because the title doesn't have a number like "$xx million" in it.

Interesting, I remember reading about them in Forbes. The only new part of this is that individual investors are able to participate. My firm is approached by hedge funds often about financing our case portfolio.

atikovi said:   
90C4 said:   Their resolved cases have averaged a 91% annualized return.  
  Boasting of outrageous returns are hallmarks of investment scams. Tread carefully.

This! I've always assumed that if such incredible returns were actually available, they absolutely would never advertise about it and create more competition. And with such great returns, they wouldn't need any investors, they should be rolling in capital.

Czechmeout said:   
atikovi said:   
90C4 said:   Their resolved cases have averaged a 91% annualized return.  
  Boasting of outrageous returns are hallmarks of investment scams. Tread carefully.

This! I've always assumed that if such incredible returns were actually available, they absolutely would never advertise about it and create more competition. And with such great returns, they wouldn't need any investors, they should be rolling in capital.

It will be interesting to follow them.  I know many people who invest in litigation privately and their returns are often 2X-3X.  Once the market becomes more mature and funding becomes less expensive to plaintiffs and attorneys, the potential returns will likely not be as strong.

I learned a long time ago that when someone offers a free investment book, you end up paying more than if the book wasn't free.

You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.


Returns
Disclaimer
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  
 

90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   
 

jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  Does registration cost $$?

 

why are you so confident that the chicago murder defendant is going to win in his (her?) suit against the city?

OIiverQuackenbush said:   why are you so confident that the chicago murder defendant is going to win in his (her?) suit against the city?
He was already exonerated because it was proven that he was framed by crooked police who were desperate to lock someone up. He's suing the city for wrongful imprisonment, which was already proven to be the case.  While nothing is certain, there's a precedent in Chicago of people receiving $1M per year falsely imprisoned. 

Good article on litigation finance here that talks about typical returns (says 100 percent is low)

Somethings dont scale well. If too many people do this, the returns will suffer as they would have to be involved with a lot cases. Lexshares need to have limit on how much money it manages. Ill-liquidity deserves a high premium.

javaman2003 said:   Somethings dont scale well. If too many people do this, the returns will suffer as they would have to be involved with a lot cases. Lexshares need to have limit on how much money it manages. Ill-liquidity deserves a high premium.
I don't follow this logic.  Returns will suffer if the cost of capital to the plaintiff goes down (which would happen if more companies offer litigation funding and compete against each other with cheaper money).  Lexshares big problem is not enough cases. They only last a few days on their site before they're fully funded

https://www.lexshares.com/cases

Only case open is probably vs. NCAA ??

Anyone besides OP try this co.? 


lex luthor
Disclaimer
needhelpplease said:   https://www.lexshares.com/cases 

Only case open is probably vs. NCAA ??

Anyone besides OP try this co.? 

  Since the shares are named after the most diabolical villian of all time, no thank you!!!

Seems legit.

needhelpplease said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  Does registration cost $$?

 

  Missed this post earlier.  No cost to register and when you do you and they confirm that you're accredited, you can see the info in the cases - the complaints, motions, full docket.  

needhelpplease said:   https://www.lexshares.com/cases 

Only case open is probably vs. NCAA ??

Anyone besides OP try this co.? 

  This is odd, I wonder if their site shows different cases to different people?  The only one I see that hasn't fully funded is about a minor league baseball league suing a law firm which actually seems like a very solid case

strange - I called the # and a guy just answered "hello". Sounds like there are just a couple of people in this company. Anyway, he said don't worry about the $5 and is just sending the book.

90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

  

Well I sincerely hope it does work out for you.

I'm just very suspicious with someone advertising such high returns.

 

jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

  

Well I sincerely hope it does work out for you.

I'm just very suspicious with someone advertising such high returns.

 


Believe me, I was too.  And my wife (who doesn't like stocks and would prefer we put our money in CDs) made me explore the asset class scrupulously before making an investment.  Do your research into it.  Lots written recently in light of the Hulk Hogan case which was financed by Peter Thiel.  There are a lot of investments I won't touch, like crowdfunded real estate and peer to peer lending, but I don't mind following the lead of these hedge funds that are making a killing!

90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

  

Well I sincerely hope it does work out for you.

I'm just very suspicious with someone advertising such high returns.

 


Believe me, I was too.  And my wife (who doesn't like stocks and would prefer we put our money in CDs) made me explore the asset class scrupulously before making an investment.  Do your research into it.  Lots written recently in light of the Hulk Hogan case which was financed by Peter Thiel.  There are a lot of investments I won't touch, like crowdfunded real estate and peer to peer lending, but I don't mind following the lead of these hedge funds that are making a killing!
 

  

That was a personal grudge as there will never be a payout of the "winnings" from that suit.  If you haven't heard, that "company" was folded after the case ended as they didn't have funds to appeal, which would have reduced if not nullified the award by the jury.  Sounds like you like the headlines of the cases like that, but fail to follow them up and see how many pennies on the dollar are actually collected and when that happens.

Still doesn't pass the smell test to me.

 

Mickie3 said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

  

Well I sincerely hope it does work out for you.

I'm just very suspicious with someone advertising such high returns.

 


Believe me, I was too.  And my wife (who doesn't like stocks and would prefer we put our money in CDs) made me explore the asset class scrupulously before making an investment.  Do your research into it.  Lots written recently in light of the Hulk Hogan case which was financed by Peter Thiel.  There are a lot of investments I won't touch, like crowdfunded real estate and peer to peer lending, but I don't mind following the lead of these hedge funds that are making a killing!

  

That was a personal grudge as there will never be a payout of the "winnings" from that suit.  If you haven't heard, that "company" was folded after the case ended as they didn't have funds to appeal, which would have reduced if not nullified the award by the jury.  Sounds like you like the headlines of the cases like that, but fail to follow them up and see how many pennies on the dollar are actually collected and when that happens.

Still doesn't pass the smell test to me.

 


I'm aware that Gawker is being sold as a result of this but you missed my point, which is that most people people didn't realize that litigation finance was a favored asset class of hedge funds and the 1% prior to this example making news and now everyone is aware of it.  Had that been a typical litigation finance investment and not a personal vendetta, Thiel would not have removed Gawker's insurance company from liability.

90C4 said:   
Mickie3 said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   
90C4 said:   
jerosen said:   You've invested in 6 cases and only 2 have paid off? What timeframe are we talking? Whats the status of the other 4 cases?

91% returns isn't good if its only on the 1/3 that succeed.

  
I've invested in 2 and awaiting resolution on the other 4.  I think the company estimates 27 months per resolution although the two I invested in that resolved were much faster.

First was 4/29/15 and that resolved on 11/24/15, IRR was 93%

Second case was a 7/23/15 investment and resolved on 3/28/16 and IRR was 88% on that one.  

The Lexshares team success rate of cases settling in their favor is excellent (I can't remember what they told me but I think over 90% - best to call them).  I'm waiting on 4.  All are commercial cases but one isn't (a guy served 23 years in jail for murder and was later exonerated and sued the city of Chicago, so I can't see how he isn't going to win).  There are no sure bets, but so far I've been impressed with their cases, track record, that they're tied to WealthForge.  Returns are either negative 100% (you lose your money if the case doesn't settle favorably) or very strong and variable based on the length of time it takes to settle.  I'll try to attach the returns graph but if it doesn't attach, I know they posted it on their facebook page. On their site it's behind the registration form.

  



Sounds "too good to be true" and from the sounds of it you haven't even made your money back yet.   

  
I don't expect every case I ever invest in to settle in my favor, which is why the returns are so high, I'm just saying that litigation finance is a viable asset class.  Read up if you feel it sounds too good to be true.  Bentham has been doing 65% on average with their investments in litigation finance http://www.americanlawyer.com/id=1202745121381/Arms-Race-Law-Fir...  Gerchen Keller is also killing it http://www.chicagobusiness.com/article/20160102/ISSUE01/30102999...

  

Well I sincerely hope it does work out for you.

I'm just very suspicious with someone advertising such high returns.

 


Believe me, I was too.  And my wife (who doesn't like stocks and would prefer we put our money in CDs) made me explore the asset class scrupulously before making an investment.  Do your research into it.  Lots written recently in light of the Hulk Hogan case which was financed by Peter Thiel.  There are a lot of investments I won't touch, like crowdfunded real estate and peer to peer lending, but I don't mind following the lead of these hedge funds that are making a killing!

  

That was a personal grudge as there will never be a payout of the "winnings" from that suit.  If you haven't heard, that "company" was folded after the case ended as they didn't have funds to appeal, which would have reduced if not nullified the award by the jury.  Sounds like you like the headlines of the cases like that, but fail to follow them up and see how many pennies on the dollar are actually collected and when that happens.

Still doesn't pass the smell test to me.

 


I'm aware that Gawker is being sold as a result of this but you missed my point, which is that most people people didn't realize that litigation finance was a favored asset class of hedge funds and the 1% prior to this example making news and now everyone is aware of it.  Had that been a typical litigation finance investment and not a personal vendetta, Thiel would not have removed Gawker's insurance company from liability.

  

I didn't see any news about litigation finance being favored by hedge funds related to the Gawker / Thiel stuff.     The Gawker suit news was all about Theil's personal vendetta.

Maybe the litigation finance aspect was covered somewhere but I missed it.    I think most people saw the stuff about Thiel being a vindictive billionaire.
 

90C4 said:   
 

I'm aware that Gawker is being sold as a result of this but you missed my point, which is that most people people didn't realize that litigation finance was a favored asset class of hedge funds and the 1% prior to this example making news and now everyone is aware of it.  Had that been a typical litigation finance investment and not a personal vendetta, Thiel would not have removed Gawker's insurance company from liability.

  Maybe litigation finance is something hedge funds do.  But I doubt they go through lexshares.

OIiverQuackenbush said:   
90C4 said:   
 

I'm aware that Gawker is being sold as a result of this but you missed my point, which is that most people people didn't realize that litigation finance was a favored asset class of hedge funds and the 1% prior to this example making news and now everyone is aware of it.  Had that been a typical litigation finance investment and not a personal vendetta, Thiel would not have removed Gawker's insurance company from liability.

  Maybe litigation finance is something hedge funds do.  But I doubt they go through lexshares.

  
I think what he's saying is that LexShares opened this asset class to individual investors.  It used to be just hedge funds and well capitalized legal firms who could invest in lawsuits, and that the Hogan story just brought litigation finance to the public's attentin

Skipping 30 Messages...
bighitter said:   Never mind, I notice that someone previously linked the article in the Wall Street Journal.  

My take: this funding might help legitimate lawsuits that otherwise wouldn't have been brought because of the upfront expense of discovery; on the other hand, this funding could prompt a bunch of marginal litigation that shouldn't have been brought in the first place.


 

  Who would invest in a marginal case though?



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