Do you ever splurge?

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Do you guys spend more than you should on any one thing? What is it?

Despite our best efforts, we have eaten out quite a lot since our incomes have spiked. I also have a burning desire to buy a specific new car. I know both are needless expenses, but I also know I can afford them and they bring me enjoyment.

We have already maxed out our 401k's, IRAs, other tax deferred retirements, etc and all debt has been paid off aside from a mortgage with a piddly rate. Maybe a part of me just doesn't want to be so responsible all the time.

Hopefully I'll sleep it off

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About 200/mo on fast food because we are lazy and work weird hours and travel.

Another 200/mo on average on random toys or video games, sporting goods, electronics or assorted other crap I don't really need because it gives me something to look forward to and get my mind off of work.

Other than those I am a model FWF citizen.

Yes. I get 2 cheeseburgers instead of 1 at McDonalds

Have you read the previous threads?

Great concert seats.

scripta said:   Have you read the previous threads
  What?!  You searched??  Get out.

I do splurge once in a while but not with big ticket items like a car. I've found that some little things once in a while satisfy that need. I actually have this in my monthly budget and stick to it.

I have a serious "want vs. need" thing going on - my little splurge money satisfies that "want" part.

I have three nights coming up at a resort that costs $550+tax/night; however, due to the CC rewards game they're costing me between $100-$150 total.

Remember - you only live once and the one who dies with the most money doesn't win...

Having said that, experiencing something exciting, such as a trip somewhere amazing may bring more satisfaction and fond memories than buying physical things.

samiam68 said:   Remember - you only live once and the one who dies with the most money doesn't win...

Having said that, experiencing something exciting, such as a trip somewhere amazing may bring more satisfaction and fond memories than buying physical things.

  I think I've read somewhere that experiential spending goes much further and is typical more rewarding. I'd tend to agree.

misterspaghetti said:   Despite our best efforts, we have eaten out quite a lot since our incomes have spiked.
 

IMO, that's not as much a "splurge" as it is a change in lifestyle leading to a higher cost of living.  It's tough to go back once you've let that creep in.

dcwilbur said:   misterspaghetti said:   Despite our best efforts, we have eaten out quite a lot since our incomes have spiked.
 

IMO, that's not as much a "splurge" as it is a change in lifestyle leading to a higher cost of living.  It's tough to go back once you've let that creep in.

could be worse, op could have had kids

If splurging means buying something you want but DO NOT need then, yes, I've done that.

Years ago I bought on the cheap a large piece of land (OK, not that large but large to me . . it's less than 100 acres) I surely did not need.  The land sits up high and is pretty (combo of woods and fields) . . but it was not productive.  I bought it solely because I, for reasons unknown, just like owning land (go figure).

Anyway years later, and SHMG I did not know or even suspect this at time of purchase and neither did the seller, but years later they discovered mineral wealth beneath my land.  At that point my past splurge transformed from a cost center into a profit center.  The surface of the land continues as before and I still enjoy it as I always have.  But a mile down they are quietly harvesting my minerals.

I splurge on other stuff, too, things I enjoy.  But my splurging tends to focus on items I can have and hold.  I don't do art, for example, because I personally lack the needed appreciation for art and I do not have the ability to discern great art.  But for those persons who know art well, I think splurging on special paintings is a neat twofer.  Similarly I have a cousin who is into, and who enjoys, antique furniture.  Some of those pieces are woo-hoo really $$$$$ expensive!  You gotta know what you are doing with such items, though, or you can get skunked quick.

Splurging on expendables, though, requires a mindset I've yet to acquire.  I can only envy folks who spend lavishly on, for example, fancy food and/or travel.  I hope someday to acquire that ability, but growing up (relatively) poor seems to have left me without the needed sense of, as Miles counseled Joel in "Risky Business", "Sometimes you gotta say "What the f***"".  So for now I remain pretty much limited to "splurges with dividends". 

dcwilbur said:   
misterspaghetti said:   Despite our best efforts, we have eaten out quite a lot since our incomes have spiked.
IMO, that's not as much a "splurge" as it is a change in lifestyle leading to a higher cost of living.  It's tough to go back once you've let that creep in.

  Splurging does give you a taste of the"better" things, making it harder to go back to the status quo without growing disdain for your day to day life.  You can't unpop the balloon; convince yourself it's ok to be spoiled one day, and it's hard to convince yourself you shouldn't be spoiled the next day.

Glitch99 said:   dcwilbur said:   
misterspaghetti said:   Despite our best efforts, we have eaten out quite a lot since our incomes have spiked.
IMO, that's not as much a "splurge" as it is a change in lifestyle leading to a higher cost of living.  It's tough to go back once you've let that creep in.

  Splurging does give you a taste of the"better" things, making it harder to go back to the status quo without growing disdain for your day to day life.  You can't unpop the balloon; convince yourself it's ok to be spoiled one day, and it's hard to convince yourself you shouldn't be spoiled the next day.

Well that depends on your baseline and if you actually find marginal value in the item you splurged on

shinobi1 said:   
I splurge on other stuff, too, things I enjoy.  But my splurging tends to focus on items I can have and hold.   

I don't consider such things to be splurging; ongoing enjoyment over years if not decades, along with having residual value, often makes it a very cost-effective endulgence. Dropping $50 on a ticket to an amusement park is splurging, spending $100 on a season pass you'll use a couple dozen times is cheap entertainment.
  

H&B

Define "Splurging".

I "Splurge" on clothes for my professional life. I'll drop a good $150-200 for a pair of allen edmond shoes. Not because I want to look rich, but rather because I consider them an investment. 20 years later they still brand new if you take care of them right. Same goes with proper dress slacks, etc...

justignoredem said:   
I "Splurge" on clothes for my professional life. I'll drop a good $150-200 for a pair of allen edmond shoes. Not because I want to look rich, but rather because I consider them an investment. 20 years later they still brand new if you take care of them right. Same goes with proper dress slacks, etc...

do they come with lifetime guarantee? how are you sure it will last 20 years?

at this point, ive given up paying premium for long lasting unless I buy from costco

Yes, I have my financial plans on autopilot and I am making good progress towards retiring early... so I splurge all of the time on about anything I want.

As far as larger outlays, like cars, I try to not have two car payments at the same time. So, right now, I am over 2 years in on a 2014 model that I bought new. My other car is a 2002 that has 225k miles and should be good for many more. However, I am considering a new car at the end of this year and giving the older one to my daughter. Maybe I will, maybe I won't. I would never feel guilty about spending my own money. I have a solid plan in place that I am on track towards. Whatever is left, I will spend on whatever I want.

i splurge only on what i love.

> art
> great food (in groceries and restaurants)
> booze
> gifts for loved ones
> parties (at home or out)
> travel
> animal care (my dog has her own apartment. not kidding.)
> mardi gras

everything else, i am cheap as hell. shitty cars, shitty clothes, shitty $20 phone, no gadgets...basically minimum spending on anything that does not directly produce happiness.

As I've grown older, I'm much more likely to "splurge" on something that will make my life easier or save time than in the past (tool, kitchenware, gadget, etc).
I've always splurged for vacations, but typically don't stay in $25/night rooms anymore (though also don't stay at fancy/chain hotels either).
That said, I'm only comfortable splurging because all of our ducks are in a row as far as emergency fund, investment goals, and generally sticking to a monthly budget. Even when I splurge, I almost always budget for it out of my monthly expenses.

MonkeyingAround said:   Yes. I get 2 cheeseburgers instead of 1 at McDonalds
 

Check if your local McDonalds still has the 2 McDoubles for $2.50. 

I splurge on working less.

To splurge, meaning the act of spending money freely or extravagantly.
I spend freely often.
I spend extravagantly, rarely.

My extravagant expenses tend to be foisted upon me by the spouse and they involve Disney vacations ever couple of years.

DavidScubadiver said:   
My extravagant expenses tend to be foisted upon me by the spouse and they involve Disney vacations ever couple of years.

  Just Say No

DigiornosHunter said:   
samiam68 said:   Remember - you only live once and the one who dies with the most money doesn't win...

Having said that, experiencing something exciting, such as a trip somewhere amazing may bring more satisfaction and fond memories than buying physical things.

  I think I've read somewhere that experiential spending goes much further and is typical more rewarding. I'd tend to agree.

  Yep. I'm still buzzing from the memories of the front row center Rolling Stones tickets I bought in 2002. Cost a fortune compared to my salary at the the time but totally worth every penny.

I splurge on savings for early retirement (50% of income).

hookers and blow

tennis8363 said:   I splurge on savings for early retirement (50% of income).
pretty sure that's the opposite of splurging. you have the "spending a disproportionate amount of income on something..." part down, but not the "...indulgent" part.

solarUS said:   
tennis8363 said:   I splurge on savings for early retirement (50% of income).
pretty sure that's the opposite of splurging. you have the "spending a disproportionate amount of income on something..." part down, but not the "...indulgent" part.

  Indulge = "allow oneself to enjoy a particular pleasure" (among other similar meanings). Walking away from work when everyone else still has 15+ years left fits the definition for me.

I buy nonsense from FW/SD I certainly don't need (a $50 "Nintendo 2DS"? not exactly sure what it is, but it's supposedly 40% off, so sure!)
I also eat out quite a bunch, as well as get drinks from starbucks, where I do some of my work (it becomes a tax deduction, but still, I don't NEED a $5 drink!)

Also, we spend a LOT of money on activities for my kids

My wife takes care of most of that for me so I don't have to worry about it.

tennis8363 said:   I splurge on savings for early retirement (50% of income).
  
Youre on FWF, that is lower than average... better step yo game up.  I live on 15% of gross income, pay obama, my retirement accounts, and student loans the rest.

Golf, booze and travel are mine.

About 4 years ago I joined a country club, that's definitely my splurge spending.

I'm not nearly as crazy frugal as most here. I've got our savings/retirement/investing on somewhat of auto pilot. I spend what's left over as I feel like it.

rascott said:   
About 4 years ago I joined a country club, that's definitely my splurge spending.

  what do you do at yoour country club

rufflesinc said:   rascott said:   
About 4 years ago I joined a country club, that's definitely my splurge spending.

  what do you do at yoour country club


Play golf, drink, eat, occasionally swim.

It's a very fun place, not at all stuffy or uptight, have made a lot of good friends and even a few business deals through relationships.

It's not really that expensive as far as clubs go, but I could definitely save money going back to playing public golf.

rascott said:   
rufflesinc said:   
rascott said:   
About 4 years ago I joined a country club, that's definitely my splurge spending.

  what do you do at yoour country club


Play golf, drink, eat, occasionally swim.

 

  does country club fee include unlimited booze and top notch food?

rufflesinc said:   rascott said:   
rufflesinc said:   
rascott said:   
About 4 years ago I joined a country club, that's definitely my splurge spending.

  what do you do at yoour country club


Play golf, drink, eat, occasionally swim.

 

  does country club fee include unlimited booze and top notch food?



Haha....I wish. My bar bills are pretty hefty during the summer months.

Skipping 53 Messages...
DigiornosHunter said:   
matrix5k said:   We splurged about 25k on a wedding. Happy wife, happy life.
  http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/13/living/wedding-expenses-study/ 

Typically I like optimizing probabilities. Spending a lot of money on a wedding is the opposite.

I have to admit we were probably around $18k after working hard to cut spending at all angles.

Certainly fair to consider this a splurge when all that is required is a $25 internet license and a $50 court license.

  made me smile.  I got married by a mayor in Ouidah, Benin while I was a Peace Corps volunteer.  We paid the mayor four bottles of alcohol and two dollars for every copy of the marriage certificate.  He did tell me that my husband could have as many wives as he wants and that I was his "heaviest piece of baggage."  The story alone is pretty priceless.  Eighteen years later, my husband is only married to me and we are glad we didn't pay anything more than what it takes to get the mayor and his friends drunk.



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