Help me with my math

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 Person A makes $100K and their spouse Person B makes $150K.

If they were to divide up the expenses by a percentage of earning, what percentage would Person B contribute??

Person B makes 50% more than Person A. Should Person B shoulder 50% more of the combined expenses? Is that a 70-30 split or 65-35 or 60-40 or ?? This is where my math is failing me...

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IMO the answer is yes, since in the extremes it has to be so.  I.e. in the case that one person works and the other does... (more)

libralibra (Aug. 08, 2016 @ 11:43p) |

As you can see above, Person B is paying 50% more (40 * 1.5 = 60). 

If you were asking for what the 'right' thing to do i... (more)

Czechmeout (Aug. 09, 2016 @ 9:30a) |

And if you divroce, spouse will absolutely take you to the bank!

darthmaul9d9 (Aug. 09, 2016 @ 7:08p) |

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A pays 40%; B pays 60%.
Thanks for trolling.

im not trolling...

Please explain how you reached that percentage.

total pot: 250,000

person A's contribution = 100,000/250,000 = 40% of the pot

person B's contribution = 150,000/250,000 = 60% of the pot

if they wanted to divide up expenses via the same percentages, then person A would pay 40% of the expenses and person B would pay 60%.

for example, electricity bill of $200 for July -- person A would put 40% of $200, or $80, towards it, person B would put 60% of $200, or $120, towards it.

----
another way to reach the same conclusion:

person B makes 1.5 times what person A does. 

1.5 x [person B] + 1 x [person A] = 100 [percent]
2.5 x = 100 [percent]
x = 100/2.5
x = 40 [percent]

thus,
person B at 1.5 x   = 40% * 1.5   = 60%
person A at 1 x = 40%

------
by the way your conclusion that person B makes 50% more than person A can be seen in those numbers:  
60% = 40% plus (50% more of 40%, which is) 20%

thank you.

DocEvil said:   thank you.
  DocE, in my original post, which you responded to before I had edited it, I have now added 2 more ways to look at the calculation

DocEvil said:    Person A makes $100K and their spouse Person B makes $150K.

If they were to divide up the expenses by a percentage of earning, what percentage would Person B contribute??

Person B makes 50% more than Person A. Should Person B shoulder 50% more of the combined expenses? Is that a 70-30 split or 65-35 or 60-40 or ?? This is where my math is failing me...

  50/50.  Each head is getting the same space to sleep, the same food to eat, the same couch to sit on, regardless of their respective incomes.  You dont use the cable TV 50% more than your spouse just because you earn 50% more.  The landlord doesnt set your rent based on your household income, where a higher income means you are paying higher rent.

Do you use the same equation when you split stuff up?  

Couples who run their marriage like it is some kind of business deal always amuse me...

Make sure you remember this math when the marriage heads for divorce.

who 's on top (earning) should pay more.

Person A needs to ask for a raise...

We did this for a while until we figured out how stupid it was. You're either committed or you aren't.

Now we just pool our resources and make financial decisions over $X together. Under $X isn't worth discussing, and certainly not worth arguing over.

Why should Person B pay for the ice cream? Person A ate more ice cream than Person B.

dcwilbur said:   Do you use the same equation when you split stuff up?  

Couples who run their marriage like it is some kind of business deal always amuse me...

  Marriage is considered a corporation under the law.  https://www.quora.com/If-marriage-is-a-constitutionally-protecte...

Spouse makes $200K, partner stays home, cooks, cleans, takes care of children. Pool income and be happy. Works for me!

To the folks who think it's clever and interesting to comment on the OP's math proficiency, on the OP's apparent salary, and link that to the entire educational system, criticising the OP personally as if he/she were not a real person --

Fatwallet is not only for people who are proficient in certain areas of life, it is open to anyone.

Sometimes people will inflate aspects of their life situation to strangers on the internet so as not to be embarrassed. The salaries in question actually might be more like $10,000 and $15,000, who knows. And that is the OP's business.

The OP was not asking for commentary on his/her salary, or for advice on his/her relationship agreements when it comes to dividing up expenses. The OP had a math question.

It does not describe the OP, but there are people out there in the world who even earn millions of dollars in salary, and cannot even read or write. I read about someone a few months ago in that situation, I think it was a successful boxer or a musician, who had to put an "X" for his signature and who never learned to read. And this was an American.
You cannot assume that someone who might not have gotten straight-As or Bs in the typical American 9th grade classroom is a person who is not otherwise amazingly talented, creative, strong, efficient, successful.

It is a fact of life that even people who got good grades in high school and who graduated from college and who even got advanced degrees can sometimes later in life be struck down with illnesses that unfairly steal some of their intellectual abilities. It can be dementia/Alzheimers, it can be a brain tumor, it can be severe brain inflammation, it can be a number of things. And it can happen to people who had been very numerate/literate in their lives before this. It can happen to people who have Nobel prizes in physics, etc.

I have adult family members who would not know the answer to this math question, and they are still the most kind, hard-working, generous, tough people you would be able to find. And they have done well in their lives and careers.

It's not very smart or educated to make quick assumptions and to cast aspersions on a person's overall abilities, when he/she dares to ask an earnest question in a polite manner in an appropriate place (a "finance" discussion forum).

If you don't have anything constructive or nice to say, and if saying something is bound to hurt someone's feelings for no good reason, and if the matter is absolutely inconsequential to your life, then maybe think of taking the high road and keeping your opinion to yourself.

---
Later edit, for clarification:  It appears that the mods have removed the prior posts I was referring to in this comment.

oppidum said:   To the folks who think it's clever and interesting to comment on the OP's math proficiency, on the OP's apparent salary, and link that to the entire educational system, criticising the OP personally as if he/she were not a real person --

Fatwallet is not only for people who are proficient in certain areas of life, it is open to anyone.

Sometimes people will inflate aspects of their life situation to strangers on the internet so as not to be embarrassed. The salaries in question actually might be more like $10,000 and $15,000, who knows. And that is the OP's business.

The OP was not asking for commentary on his/her salary, or for advice on his/her relationship agreements when it comes to dividing up expenses. The OP had a math question.

It does not describe the OP, but there are people out there in the world who even earn millions of dollars in salary, and cannot even read or write. I read about someone a few months ago in that situation, I think it was a successful boxer or a musician, who had to put an "X" for his signature and who never learned to read. And this was an American.
You cannot assume that someone who might not have gotten straight-As or Bs in the typical American 9th grade classroom is a person who is not otherwise amazingly talented, creative, strong, efficient, successful.

It is a fact of life that even people who got good grades in high school and who graduated from college and who even got advanced degrees can sometimes later in life be struck down with illnesses that unfairly steal some of their intellectual abilities. It can be dementia/Alzheimers, it can be a brain tumor, it can be severe brain inflammation, it can be a number of things. And it can happen to people who had been very numerate/literate in their lives before this. It can happen to people who have Nobel prizes in physics, etc.

I have adult family members who would not know the answer to this math question, and they are still the most kind, hard-working, generous, tough people you would be able to find. And they have done well in their lives and careers.

It's not very smart or educated to make quick assumptions and to cast aspersions on a person's overall abilities, when he/she dares to ask an earnest question in a polite manner in an appropriate place (a "finance" discussion forum).

If you don't have anything constructive or nice to say, and if saying something is bound to hurt someone's feelings for no good reason, and if the matter is absolutely inconsequential to your life, then maybe think of taking the high road and keeping your opinion to yourself.

  I also thought that OP could have added a zero to both salaries.

Nonetheless, we have a place in the forum if you don't want criticism for basic questions:

https://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/796908/

oppidum said:   Sometimes people will inflate aspects of their life situation to strangers on the internet so as not to be embarrassed. The salaries in question actually might be more like $10,000 and $15,000, who knows. And that is the OP's business.
 

I do generally agree with your post.
However, anyone who understands enough to know that the answer to the OP is the same whether presented as 100k/150k or 10k/15k should be able to figure out the answer to OP.

 

Math is failing you because it's more a philosophical question than a math question.

There's an argument for 50/50 for the portions of the fixed expenses the spouses consume equally with things like car expenses allocated to the primary user.

There's an argument for 60/40, as that apportions fixed expenses proportionate to the income.

Some would even argue the higher-earner should artificially subsidize the lower-earner so their disposable incomes are more even.

My stance would be that adults pool resources, plan budgets jointly, and coordinate major purchases.

Unless it was mentioned in another thread, OP never said they were married.

ETA I can't read.

stanolshefski said:   Unless it was mentioned in another thread, OP never said they were married.
  Are we talking about the same OP?
DocEvil said:    Person A makes $100K and their spouse Person B makes $150K.
 

  
 

qcumber98 said:   Why should Person B pay for the ice cream? Person A ate more ice cream than Person B.
  Not that simple!  What if person B hadn't eaten ice cream for a few weeks, so their marginal value for each bite of ice cream is higher than Person A?  Should Person A pay more for less value?

It's okay for users to reply to the OP so long as they do so in a respectful manner. Now let's get back to the answers to the user's original question and not the state of education in this country.

Here's how to calculate a percentage when you have two numbers, X & Y
(X / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that X is of the total
(Y / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that Y is of the total

In the general case, if you want to do this for more numbers, the formula is:
(X / (sum of all the numbers) * 100) = percent that X is of the total

BostonOne said:   Here's how to calculate a percentage when you have two numbers, X & Y
(X / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that X is of the total
(Y / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that Y is of the total

In the general case, if you want to do this for more numbers, the formula is:
(X / (sum of all the numbers) * 100) = percent that X is of the total

That doesn't work if a person has negative income

That person probably doesn't work either.

rufflesinc said:   
BostonOne said:   Here's how to calculate a percentage when you have two numbers, X & Y
(X / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that X is of the total
(Y / (X + Y)) * 100 = percent that Y is of the total

In the general case, if you want to do this for more numbers, the formula is:
(X / (sum of all the numbers) * 100) = percent that X is of the total

That doesn't work if a person has negative income

 What do you mean "work"?  Practically or mathematically?

For ALL values of X and Y, %X of total + %Y of total = 100%...EXCEPT when X +Y = 0.

oppidum said:   The OP was not asking for commentary on his/her salary, or for advice on his/her relationship agreements when it comes to dividing up expenses. The OP had a math question.
From OP:
DocEvil said:   Person B makes 50% more than Person A. Should Person B shoulder 50% more of the combined expenses?
IMO the answer is yes, since in the extremes it has to be so.  I.e. in the case that one person works and the other doesn't, obviously one person must shoulder all the expenses.  Moving down the split from 100/0 to 90/10, the higher earner would still contribute more, until you got to 50/50 and each person shoulders the same amount.  

This principle is borne out during a divorce in a community property state: everything is split 50/50, so if one person had earned more of the assets, then he/she ends up contributing proportionally more to the divorce.

DocEvil said:   Person A makes $100K and their spouse Person B makes $150K.
If they were to divide up the expenses by a percentage of earning, what percentage would Person B contribute??

From a strictly math perspective, as others have stated it is (Personal Income/Household Income)*100, so:
Person A: $100/($100+$150)=40%
Person B: $150/($100+$150)=60%
DocEvil said:   Person B makes 50% more than Person A. Should Person B shoulder 50% more of the combined expenses? 
As you can see above, Person B is paying 50% more (40 * 1.5 = 60). 

If you were asking for what the 'right' thing to do in a relationship is, that is an entirely different matter with no clear answer. Many advocate for a completely shared pot of money but that may not be the best strategy for all couples, especially those with divergent financial goals.

Just a few arguments for either side:
Why Person B should contribute more
-This allows each person to have a proportional amount of discretionary spending money (if total expenses are $200k and expenses were split evenly, Person A would have zero allocated money and Person B would have $50k)

Why the split should be 50/50
-If Person B is working 50% more hours to achieve the higher income than shouldn't they get to keep their 'fun money'? (Had friend work overtime and pick up odd jobs so they could buy a boat, when the spouse found out how much money was saved then that money was reallocated to house improvements)
-Person B is likely not consuming 50% more of the costs (are they taking 50% longer showers, etc)

pattyB said:   Spouse makes $200K, partner stays home, cooks, cleans, takes care of children. Pool income and be happy. Works for me!
  And if you divroce, spouse will absolutely take you to the bank!



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