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I have a rental property with a pool which is currently being rented.  I plan to continue renting it for another 5 years or longer, in which I plan to move into later.  The pool plaster (from what I understand is the original), with the house built in the 1950's.  There is a 1 inch chip on the plaster of the pool and the surface looks a little rough (but not cracked).  House is based in Southern California.  Having novice experience with pools, I am wondering if it is worth going through the expensive process of replastering a pool - besides the cosmetic benefits? Is there really any structural benefits, and if so how do you know if it is necessary to replaster? I understand it may cost 5k+ and that would impact my cashflow in the red.

Thanks in advance for your expertise.


 

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pools on rental property are liability

Thanks.  I do use a limitation of liability on the lease contract, a separate addendum that the tenant signed that pool injuries are the tenants liability, and rental property insurance with coverage for any litigation...

Turn it into a garden.

bleebca said:   Thanks.  I do use a limitation of liability on the lease contract, a separate addendum that the tenant signed that pool injuries are the tenants liability, and rental property insurance with coverage for any litigation...
  might wanna get a $10MM umbrella and i don't mean to protect you from the splashing

The plaster is the waterproofing surface in the pool, not the gunite shell. Depending on how bad the plaster is, water will leak into the surrounding soil and can create problems. However, I would imagine the plaster would need to be in pretty bad shape to cause non-cosmetic issues.

A pool guy should be able to repair the 1" chip. I just had a slightly larger repair done on my pool and it was $275, so not terrible.

If it's from the 50s it's definitely served it's life. I re-plastered once already from plaster to pebble tec and that was after 13 years. I'm just starting to get chipping and delaminating in the Pebble Tec and it's 11 years old.

vegas4x4 said:   The plaster is the waterproofing surface in the pool, not the gunite shell. Depending on how bad the plaster is, water will leak into the surrounding soil and can create problems. However, I would imagine the plaster would need to be in pretty bad shape to cause non-cosmetic issues.

A pool guy should be able to repair the 1" chip. I just had a slightly larger repair done on my pool and it was $275, so not terrible.

If it's from the 50s it's definitely served it's life. I re-plastered once already from plaster to pebble tec and that was after 13 years. I'm just starting to get chipping and delaminating in the Pebble Tec and it's 11 years old.
 

  Thank you very much for your insight and explanation.  I will definitely look into getting the chip fixed.

 

jerosen said: How much more rent can you charge for a place with a working pool? I'm thinking there should be more rent coming in and that would be enough to pay for the pool maintenance/repair long term.
If you're planning to move to that house yourself eventually, do you want a functional pool for when you live there?
What is the property worth and what does it rent for?

I'd say its probably worth fixing.

  The rental does provide a premium for the pool.  Also being So Cal, there is a premium to the pricing (because I didn't have to install the pool and it was an existing working feature).  I do want a functional pool, and also there is a possibility to sell the place with a pool if we don't end up moving in.

Given Vegas4x4's comments, I'm thinking of patching where required, and re-plastering later when we decide to sell or move in (so the "new" plaster doesn't get damaged by the tenants).

Thanks again everyone!



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