Tmobile unlimited LTE vs home internet service

Archived From: Finance
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
Since i am not a heavy internet user, i am thinking about this. We are only 2 people so

Tmobile unlimited LTE first person $70/month , 2nd person $50/month

Total $120/month

Or

$80/month for crappy internet service + tmobile 2 person plan $60/month

Total: $140/month

Moneywise it makes sense but can our HTC phones deliver 2-3 hours tethering for movie on tv or youtube videos? Does constant tethering wear phones? How about LTE speed?

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
Well, they actually can, just like the cell providers get away with not defining any terms for their obligations (Not ev... (more)

Bend3r (Sep. 16, 2016 @ 1:21p) |

Dude, give it up.  Its well defined in the terms, you just don't LIKE them.  Tethering is limited, they tell you EXACTLY... (more)

RedWolfe01 (Sep. 18, 2016 @ 11:12p) |

You misread what I said is not defined, I said the customer's limitations and obligations are defined but not the carrie... (more)

Bend3r (Sep. 19, 2016 @ 9:59a) |

Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

The LTE speeds depend highly on your area. I could get great speeds at my house, but almost no service at a friends house.

Your phone should be able to tether for long periods of time if you have it plugged in. If its not plugged in you will drain your battery, but a couple hours should be fine. Your phone will typically run hotter while tethering so over long periods of time this might effect its longevity.

what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

I pay $35/month for standalone cable internet with 50Mbps speed.

bpydimer said:   I pay $35/month for standalone cable internet with 50Mbps speed.
  Great -- what you pay locally does OP no good.

What kind of 'crappy' local internet? Cable? DSL? UVerse (Which is really DSL) Fiber?

rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.

Be careful using the new T-MobileONE unlimited plans as your only source of internet connection for wifi connected computers and other devices. Your tethering speeds will likely be limited to 3G speeds at all times. If T-Mobile has good coverage in your area, particularly while you're home, service issues won't be a problem. If you'd be comfortable downgrading to the old DSL speeds (2-3 mbps) it would probably work, at least for a while. Netflix may or may not be able to stream flawlessly at that speed unless you manually select the 480p resolution.

The next questions I'd ask are whether you can take a phone call while continuing to maintain wifi hotspot tethering use and whether this significantly slows down the connection speed at all. Are you always going to be using both phones for hotspot access? What if one of you leaves the house? Are you going to be able to keep both phones plugged in all the time?

SlimTim said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.


  I'll second this. I recently moved and could only get DSL as phone lines are run to my house (in the country on a dead end road with 6 or 8 houses). Cable is not run down our road but I could have it run to my house for the low low price of $40k! The DSL is the slowest speed possible so I'm looking into cellular as well. Be advised that if you want internet on your computer, they count this as tethering and last I checked you only got 5GB. I'm looking into cricket unlimited @ $70 (AT&T MVNO that limits downloads to 8 Mbps). They don't say anything specific about tethering and folks on howardforums have been using it and transferring hundreds of gigs a month tethered.

If you are not a heavy internet user, I don't see why replacing wired internet service with cellular would be a problem. Just remember that streaming media eats up bandwidth very quickly if you do any of that (I'm not positive what you mean by "heavy internet user" but I assume that means low data usage). And it will be a bit more of a hassle to use internet on your laptop/roku/xbox/etc.

fleetwoodmac said:   Since i am not a heavy internet user, i am thinking about this. We are only 2 people so

Moneywise it makes sense but can our HTC phones deliver 2-3 hours tethering for movie on tv or youtube videos? Does constant tethering wear phones? How about LTE speed?
 

  

How "unlimited" is TMobile's "unlimited" LTE?

I thought phone data tended to have expectations in the 2GB - 4GB per month range.

in my household that exclusively streams TV/movies, I've looked at my monthly usage via the ISP and we're pushing 200GB - 300GB per month.

No way would that fly with Tmobile.
They might not charge me for it, but they'd probably cancel the service.

SlimTim said:   rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.

Well most apt and condo will have a phone line and a cable line right? that would be two choices

ogp said:   
SlimTim said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.


  I'll second this. I recently moved and could only get DSL as phone lines are run to my house (in the country on a dead end road with 6 or 8 houses). Cable is not run down our road but I could have it run to my house for the low low price of $40k! The DSL is the slowest speed possible so I'm looking into cellular as well. Be advised that if you want internet on your computer, they count this as tethering and last I checked you only got 5GB. I'm looking into cricket unlimited @ $70 (AT&T MVNO that limits downloads to 8 Mbps). They don't say anything specific about tethering and folks on howardforums have been using it and transferring hundreds of gigs a month tethered.

If you are not a heavy internet user, I don't see why replacing wired internet service with cellular would be a problem. Just remember that streaming media eats up bandwidth very quickly if you do any of that (I'm not positive what you mean by "heavy internet user" but I assume that means low data usage). And it will be a bit more of a hassle to use internet on your laptop/roku/xbox/etc.

Cricket says quite a bit about tethering.  It's specifically prohibits any type of tethering on their unlimited plan, and they charge an extra $10/month in order to "legally" tether on limited high speed data plans.  Whether you can get away with it is another story.  If you're an iPhone user, you'll probably have to jailbreak.  Android phones have easier workarounds for this.

SlimTim said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.

Sometimes it's not always rural areas that face this problem.  I lived for 30 years in a condo development in a densely populated suburb of the biggest of all the big cities, but it was on the north edge of town in an area used mostly for business.  It was originally wired for cable when it was built in the 1980s, but only for one cable provider.  Then when Verizon got into the game, they wired FIOS for the entire area, including neighboring towns EXCEPT for the condo developments on the north edge of town.  It simply wasn't economical for them and still isn't.

There's only one cable option, and satellite dishes are only available to some residents, because they're prohibited from being put on the roof or attached to the side of the building.  You'd need a southern exposed unobstructed deck or patio for that, and give up quite a bit of space out there.  Choices are limited, but not due to any exclusivity contract.  Still, to this day, the four choices are (1) Cablevision (2) satellite, if feasible for your particular unit (3) Verizon DSL on old copper lines (4) dial-up.

DTASFAB brings up some good points upthread about taking phone calls, doing so will grenade your tether speeds.

Consdier a lower Tmobile plan and a 3rd line instead? When you consider binge on data doesn't count towards your cap, 10GB plans can even be plenty for light home use. Get 3x10GB lines and buy a nokia 640 and use it as a dedicated wifi tether.

Netflix - no cap
Hulu - no cap
youtube - no cap
most other video services - no cap.

Stubtify said:   DTASFAB brings up some good points upthread about taking phone calls, doing so will grenade your tether speeds.

Consdier a lower Tmobile plan and a 3rd line instead? When you consider binge on data doesn't count towards your cap, 10GB plans can even be plenty for light home use. Get 3x10GB lines and buy a nokia 640 and use it as a dedicated wifi tether.

Netflix - no cap
Hulu - no cap
youtube - no cap
most other video services - no cap.

They're not offering the 10GB plans with Binge-on anymore for new users.  People who are already on that plan can keep it or switch to the new plan if they choose.

The old T-Mobile unlimited plan, if you're grandfathered in, allows for full speed tethering up to 14GB per phone per month.

Binge-on was a scam because it only allowed for partnered streaming on the cellular device itself, not when tethered to a computer or smart TV.  So you would need some kind of adapter to stream video out of your phone into a HDMI port on your TV to get unlimited Netflix/Hulu/Etc. with Binge-on.  Chromecast or AirPlay might work I guess, but I've never done it, so I'm not sure.

EDIT:  I'm wrong... apparently the 2GB/6GB/10GB/unlimited Simple Choice plans are still available: http://www.t-mobile.com/cell-phone-plans/scnc-phone-plans.html#t...

One other thing... I don't remember if it was FW or HF where I read about someone who had an old Sprint unlimited plan with modern high speed phones and he somehow managed to use them for tethering without being detected or throttled to the tune of 200-300GB/month, so it's entirely possible to get away with stuff you're not supposed to get away with. Just understand if you get caught doing that on a post-paid plan, they can send you a huge bill, and on any type of plan, they can kill your speeds.

arch8ngel said:     
How "unlimited" is TMobile's "unlimited" LTE?

I thought phone data tended to have expectations in the 2GB - 4GB per month range.

 

The industry standard for truly unlimited high speed on a postpaid plan is 23-26GB per plan, regardless of the number of lines.

DTASFAB, binge on works over tethering just fine for me. I use the setup listed above and average 32GB a month of total data and about 5gb of "metered" data in my 10GB bucket.

I've noticed throttling to 2-3Mbps (still useable) after 6 months of 30+Gb; but I just cancel and start a new one when they start that.

This is using the prepaid 10GB plans from FW, bluegreen mobile and nettalk (They're not without issues, but the price is unbeatable).

Stubtify said:   DTASFAB, binge on works over tethering just fine for me. I use the setup listed above and average 32GB a month of total data and about 5gb of "metered" data in my 10GB bucket.

I've noticed throttling to 2-3Mbps (still useable) after 6 months of 30+Gb; but I just cancel and start a new one when they start that.

This is using the prepaid 10GB plans from FW, bluegreen mobile and nettalk (They're not without issues, but the price is unbeatable).

Wow those are some good data points.  I was told in a T-Mobile store by someone who I could tell wasn't an idiot that Binge-on would only apply to the T-Mobile connected device, not any other devices tethered to it either with a wire or via wifi hotspot.  But that was on T-Mobile simple choice plans with Binge-on.  I have no idea if the same would apply when connecting to the T-Mobile network through an MVNO.

Also, when you say using the setup listed above, what exactly do you mean?  If you connected your phone to your TV to use your TV as a larger phone video monitor (either with a wired HDMI adapter or AirPlay/Chromecast), that's not tethering.  It's only tethering if the secondary device is developing its own direct connection to the entire internet through your phone's hotspot - like a smart TV that connects to Netflix by logging into Netflix on the TV, not on the Netflix app in your phone.

DTASFAB said:   One other thing... I don't remember if it was FW or HF where I read about someone who had an old Sprint unlimited plan with modern high speed phones and he somehow managed to use them for tethering without being detected or throttled to the tune of 200-300GB/month, so it's entirely possible to get away with stuff you're not supposed to get away with. Just understand if you get caught doing that on a post-paid plan, they can send you a huge bill, and on any type of plan, they can kill your speeds.
  Sprint starts greatly deprioritizing around 23GB.  They will send you a letter now (or already as of 2 years ago, anyways, when I got one the month I bought my note 4 and reloaded lots of GB+ apps on it... plus installed custom roms a couple times) at <60GB warning of a disconnect the next month.  That's regardless of how you use the data.  20-30GB every month is fine though. Some of the super expensive new "unlimited" Sprint plans allow tethering up to 5GB but all also limit VPN to only use a tether data bucket of 5GB.  On the old plans VPNs are still allowed.  The only other high-data Sprint plans (which are not available at reasonable price anymore ) are the ones that allow tethering from the Double Data promo in 2014.  It was around ~$100 (after corp discounts) for 80GB of shared data during that promo and you could add unsubsidized lines for only $10 instead of the $20 on all current shared plans (and specifically allows tethering in the data bucket plans).  They even offered perpetual no-line-fee on the first four lines if you ported in a number at that time.  I screwed up and should have got us swapped to that plan back then, it was before the clamp-downs on the ED plans and the war against fair substitutes for the subsidies they are trying to remove without adjusting down the plan prices.  The legacy ED family plans can run about ~$45/mo a line all fees included after discounts for 5-7 lines, and include contract subsidies (at least for now).

There are some new Tmobile plans around $100 for 1 line that includes tethering up to ~20GB, but has a disclaimer that you still must have primary usage on the phone itself, so they expect >20GB non-tether to use 20GB tether (really weird provision).  TMO doesn't like VPN and will assume it is tethering while having done deep packet inspection for a long time to see what data you're otherwise sending.

DTASFAB said:   
Stubtify said:   DTASFAB, binge on works over tethering just fine for me. I use the setup listed above and average 32GB a month of total data and about 5gb of "metered" data in my 10GB bucket.

I've noticed throttling to 2-3Mbps (still useable) after 6 months of 30+Gb; but I just cancel and start a new one when they start that.

This is using the prepaid 10GB plans from FW, bluegreen mobile and nettalk (They're not without issues, but the price is unbeatable).

Wow those are some good data points.  I was told in a T-Mobile store by someone who I could tell wasn't an idiot that Binge-on would only apply to the T-Mobile connected device, not any other devices tethered to it either with a wire or via wifi hotspot.  But that was on T-Mobile simple choice plans with Binge-on.  I have no idea if the same would apply when connecting to the T-Mobile network through an MVNO.

Also, when you say using the setup listed above, what exactly do you mean?  If you connected your phone to your TV to use your TV as a larger phone video monitor (either with a wired HDMI adapter or AirPlay/Chromecast), that's not tethering.  It's only tethering if the secondary device is developing its own direct connection to the entire internet through your phone's hotspot - like a smart TV that connects to Netflix by logging into Netflix on the TV, not on the Netflix app in your phone.

  Straight from the T-Mobile FAQ :
Does Binge On apply to video streamed while tethering?
When Binge On is enabled, streaming video from participating Binge On providers never touches your high-speed data allotment if you're tethering from a smartphone, tablet, or mobile internet device to a laptop, desktop, tablet, or handset.  Other devices aren't currently supported by the Binge On program.

I have a lumia 640 that has a T-Mobile sim in it. All devices connect to that directly via WiFi tether built into the phone.

Laptop and tablet connect to it and stream Netflix and hulu. Tablet connects to TV via HDMI and is used daily for TV watching. Thermostat connects so I can turn on ac if needed. Assorted other tablets and phones connect to it as needed. One plays music to BT speakers.

I had a more complicated setup with a wireless router that repeated the 640's wifi signal but it wasn't really necessary so I stopped using it. In a larger house something like that would help extend your range.

DTASFAB said:   
ogp said:   
SlimTim said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone

Not always - some shared buildings like apartments or condos will contract with only one provider. Less urban areas may not have either, let alone both. Living in a rural type area can be relatively inexpensive, but limited and/or expensive services like this are one of the trade-offs I try to include in comparisons.


  I'll second this. I recently moved and could only get DSL as phone lines are run to my house (in the country on a dead end road with 6 or 8 houses). Cable is not run down our road but I could have it run to my house for the low low price of $40k! The DSL is the slowest speed possible so I'm looking into cellular as well. Be advised that if you want internet on your computer, they count this as tethering and last I checked you only got 5GB. I'm looking into cricket unlimited @ $70 (AT&T MVNO that limits downloads to 8 Mbps). They don't say anything specific about tethering and folks on howardforums have been using it and transferring hundreds of gigs a month tethered.

If you are not a heavy internet user, I don't see why replacing wired internet service with cellular would be a problem. Just remember that streaming media eats up bandwidth very quickly if you do any of that (I'm not positive what you mean by "heavy internet user" but I assume that means low data usage). And it will be a bit more of a hassle to use internet on your laptop/roku/xbox/etc.

Cricket says quite a bit about tethering.  It's specifically prohibits any type of tethering on their unlimited plan, and they charge an extra $10/month in order to "legally" tether on limited high speed data plans.  Whether you can get away with it is another story.  If you're an iPhone user, you'll probably have to jailbreak.  Android phones have easier workarounds for this.

  
They do, but there are a few folks on howardforums that say they've been using the service tethered for months with a few hundred gigs of data transfer. My household routinely use around 400 GB a month or so. I plan on getting the unlimited plan and tethering to my firewall and testing it out. Even with their capped speed, it is still almost 3x as fast as my DSL.

fleetwoodmac said:   
$80/month for crappy internet service + tmobile 2 person plan $60/month

Total: $140/month

 

  What do you have for TV and landline phone? I've got Verizon FIOS triple play with 2 phone lines at $133 OTD plus two phones on Ting for under $30 a month. You can't compare the quality of landline phones and wired internet to wireless service.

Using your phone as a Hotspot will affect your phone due to the hard use of the cell phone CPU. When seriously pulling data. The phones can get downright HOT. Another thing to consider when shopping for a phone with that feature is your ability to get calls. When my sister is using her phone as a Hotspot, I cannot call her. IF I do get thru, her Hotspot may drop signal or data rate.

There are fixed position and/or portable devices that are dedicated Hotspots.
In either case, YMMV depending on signal quality to your location. That can vary due to weather and number of people being serviced by the tower you are connecting to as well as the servers servicing that tower.  Given the variables, I would be shocked if you would be happy for data video steaming which consumes more data than you may realize.   Video streaming has various levels of transmission   (SD, HD, HDX).  Depending on the source, you may or may not be able to select which of those you receive.  Two hours or so of video are NOT light use.

Generally Tmo uses a tethering limit on "unlimited" (14GB as someone mentioned feels about right) So I expect that will be the case on the new plans as well.

The way HoFo vets get around the limits is usually by rooting the handset and tethering to the mobile APN instead of the IP APN that are usually used. Its also why tethered devices don't usually use "Binge on" -- the handset is supposed to detect the traffic and run at SD as well as not use plan data. Tethering generally goes on a "more direct" path to the internet via a normal APN.

rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone
  DSL from windstream or cable which my house is not wired for from comcast $80/month  

forbin4040 said:   What kind of 'crappy' local internet? Cable? DSL? UVerse (Which is really DSL) Fiber?
  DSL

but very slow and windstream is monopoly here in 77477 or duopoly

Stubtify said:   I have a lumia 640 that has a T-Mobile sim in it. All devices connect to that directly via WiFi tether built into the phone.

Laptop and tablet connect to it and stream Netflix and hulu. Tablet connects to TV via HDMI and is used daily for TV watching. Thermostat connects so I can turn on ac if needed. Assorted other tablets and phones connect to it as needed. One plays music to BT speakers.

I had a more complicated setup with a wireless router that repeated the 640's wifi signal but it wasn't really necessary so I stopped using it. In a larger house something like that would help extend your range.

  The 640 is a great little phone considering you can get it for $30.  I use it to tether when sometimes my regular cable provider has outages.  Works amazingly well!

fleetwoodmac said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone
  DSL from windstream or cable which my house is not wired for from comcast $80/month  

  Ouch that's expensive.  Maybe with the spectrum rebranding it will come down?  Locally they start at $35 for 50/5 from TWC, it's rumored to be $40/mo for 100/10 with the spectrum rebranding in another week or so.  No contract and price set for only 12 months, but then you can transfer the account to another person at the same address and do new customer pricing for the next 12 months and switch back and forth every year.

Bend3r said:   
fleetwoodmac said:   
rufflesinc said:   what kind of wired internet? you should have at least two choices, cable and phone
  DSL from windstream or cable which my house is not wired for from comcast $80/month  

  Ouch that's expensive.  Maybe with the spectrum rebranding it will come down?  Locally they start at $35 for 50/5 from TWC, it's rumored to be $40/mo for 100/10 with the spectrum rebranding in another week or so.  No contract and price set for only 12 months, but then you can transfer the account to another person at the same address and do new customer pricing for the next 12 months and switch back and forth every year.

  there is no tcm where I live

77477

oops, my bad I confused charter with comcast Both start with a "c"

DTASFAB said:   
arch8ngel said:     
How "unlimited" is TMobile's "unlimited" LTE?

I thought phone data tended to have expectations in the 2GB - 4GB per month range.

 

The industry standard for truly unlimited high speed on a postpaid plan is 23-26GB per plan, regardless of the number of lines.

  Actually, it's 23-26GB per LINE.  T-Mobile's limit is definitely 26GB PER LINE before you risk getting throttled.  For throttling, each line is considered individually. 

O
fleetwoodmac said:   Since i am not a heavy internet user, i am thinking about this. We are only 2 people so

Tmobile unlimited LTE first person $70/month , 2nd person $50/month

Total $120/month

Or

$80/month for crappy internet service + tmobile 2 person plan $60/month

Total: $140/month

Moneywise it makes sense but can our HTC phones deliver 2-3 hours tethering for movie on tv or youtube videos? Does constant tethering wear phones? How about LTE speed?

  OP, Good Idea! but you really don't need to assume tethering is the only option for watching movies on TV. I use apps on my iPhone and then cast the app onto the TV (by way of Google's Cast device - it used to be chrome cast originally but now it is a more powerful casting device).

just saying....

dealgain said:   O
fleetwoodmac said:   Since i am not a heavy internet user, i am thinking about this. We are only 2 people so

Tmobile unlimited LTE first person $70/month , 2nd person $50/month

Total $120/month

Or

$80/month for crappy internet service + tmobile 2 person plan $60/month

Total: $140/month

Moneywise it makes sense but can our HTC phones deliver 2-3 hours tethering for movie on tv or youtube videos? Does constant tethering wear phones? How about LTE speed?

  OP, Good Idea! but you really don't need to assume tethering is the only option for watching movies on TV. I use apps on my iPhone and then cast the app onto the TV (by way of Google's Cast device - it used to be chrome cast originally but now it is a more powerful casting device).

just saying....

  Except that, if you're casting from your phone to the Chromecast, and the Chromecast is getting its data access through your phone, it's just a tethering connecting between your phone and the Chromecast. 

cestmoi123 said:   
  Except that, if you're casting from your phone to the Chromecast, and the Chromecast is getting its data access through your phone, it's just a tethering connecting between your phone and the Chromecast. 

  The whole arbitrary "tethering" delineation is nonsense.  Using bluetooth headphones or speakers is also clearly tethering data.  But, try and find a carrier that tells you bluetooth headphones or speakers are a TOS violation.  All bluetooth devices have a separate CPU and they process and use the data completely external to the phone.

There's also several existing phones that have a direct HDMI output and can be connected to a TV or other large display.  Would you argue that's tethering as well? Clearly in those cases the phone is "using" all the data directly and processing it, it's only output is from it's graphics chipset that either goes to the smartphone display or through the HDMI connection.

Bend3r said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
  Except that, if you're casting from your phone to the Chromecast, and the Chromecast is getting its data access through your phone, it's just a tethering connecting between your phone and the Chromecast. 

  The whole arbitrary "tethering" delineation is nonsense.  Using bluetooth headphones or speakers is also clearly tethering data.  But, try and find a carrier that tells you bluetooth headphones or speakers are a TOS violation.  All bluetooth devices have a separate CPU and they process and use the data completely external to the phone.

There's also several existing phones that have a direct HDMI output and can be connected to a TV or other large display.  Would you argue that's tethering as well? Clearly in those cases the phone is "using" all the data directly and processing it, it's only output is from it's graphics chipset that either goes to the smartphone display or through the HDMI connection.

I'm not defending the cellular providers one bit, but there are technical differences.  If I use my iPhone to connect to T-Mobile 's LTE network and turn on the hotspot feature, the phone is effectively becoming a wireless modem that other devices can use to connect to the internet.  Instead of having a hard-lined cable signal directed to a cable modem that's connected to a wireless router, my iPhone is effectively both the modem and router, and instead of connecting to the cable provider's network through the hard line, the iPhone is connecting to an LTE cell phone tower.  Then if I use my smart TV to connect to the internet using the wifi network provided by my iPhone (rather than the wifi network provided by my wireless router that's set up through the cable modem) the smart TV is effectively "tethered" to the iPhone to gain access to the ENTIRE INTERNET.  In other words, the TV is connected to Netflix by logging in to Netflix using my Netflix user ID and password entered on the smart TV menu, but as far as T-Mobile is concerned, that smart TV could be a laptop computer connected to the entire internet through the iPhone's wifi hotspot, and in fact, you could also have a laptop computer connected in exactly that manner at the same time your smart TV is connected to Netflix.

On the other hand, there are other ways of redirecting content from your i-device wirelessly, such as BT, Chromecast, etc.  But that's simply eliminating a wire between the i-device and the screen, speakers, etc.  Whether you listen with wired headphones or BT headphones, the headphones aren't tethered to the INTERNET.  There's no LTE internet connection for your wireless headphones.  I guess you could say they're "tethered" to your i-device, but that's not a truly accurate use of the word tethered.  In addition, sending a video signal from your i-device to your TV using BT or Chromecast or a wired HDMI cable that connects from the phone's lightning port to an HDMI input behind your dumb TV is also not tethering.  It would be similar to setting up a second monitor on your computer, which would not necessarily require a wire.  Theoretically at least, a 1080P signal could be sent from your desktop computer to its video monitor(s) without any wires.  But your monitor doesn't have its own direct internet connection.  It's connected to your PC that is connected to the internet.

DTASFAB said:   
Bend3r said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
  Except that, if you're casting from your phone to the Chromecast, and the Chromecast is getting its data access through your phone, it's just a tethering connecting between your phone and the Chromecast. 

  The whole arbitrary "tethering" delineation is nonsense.  Using bluetooth headphones or speakers is also clearly tethering data.  But, try and find a carrier that tells you bluetooth headphones or speakers are a TOS violation.  All bluetooth devices have a separate CPU and they process and use the data completely external to the phone.

There's also several existing phones that have a direct HDMI output and can be connected to a TV or other large display.  Would you argue that's tethering as well? Clearly in those cases the phone is "using" all the data directly and processing it, it's only output is from it's graphics chipset that either goes to the smartphone display or through the HDMI connection.

I'm not defending the cellular providers one bit, but there are technical differences.  If I use my iPhone to connect to T-Mobile 's LTE network and turn on the hotspot feature, the phone is effectively becoming a wireless modem that other devices can use to connect to the internet.  Instead of having a hard-lined cable signal directed to a cable modem that's connected to a wireless router, my iPhone is effectively both the modem and router, and instead of connecting to the cable provider's network through the hard line, the iPhone is connecting to an LTE cell phone tower.  Then if I use my smart TV to connect to the internet using the wifi network provided by my iPhone (rather than the wifi network provided by my wireless router that's set up through the cable modem) the smart TV is effectively "tethered" to the iPhone to gain access to the ENTIRE INTERNET.    Whether you listen with wired headphones or BT headphones, the headphones aren't tethered to the INTERNET.  

  You're arbitrarily re-defining what you are calling internet and making up technical differences that are not real technical differences.  The data stream is coming directly over the internet and being sent to the headphones (Sure, Pandora, etc is handling some of the control, although BT has some 2-way control methods).  When you tether a PC, the data's not always untouched either.  Some apps will repackage the packets to send them to the pc and back, the same as pandora or other app passing through the audio stream.  Sending to TV's is the same as speakers except it's picture data rather than just audio.  Not sure how you would argue the audio doesn't count but audio plus pictures does...  The only difference is that video is typically at higher data rates.

Bend3r said:   DTASFAB said:   
Bend3r said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
  Except that, if you're casting from your phone to the Chromecast, and the Chromecast is getting its data access through your phone, it's just a tethering connecting between your phone and the Chromecast. 

  The whole arbitrary "tethering" delineation is nonsense.  Using bluetooth headphones or speakers is also clearly tethering data.  But, try and find a carrier that tells you bluetooth headphones or speakers are a TOS violation.  All bluetooth devices have a separate CPU and they process and use the data completely external to the phone.

There's also several existing phones that have a direct HDMI output and can be connected to a TV or other large display.  Would you argue that's tethering as well? Clearly in those cases the phone is "using" all the data directly and processing it, it's only output is from it's graphics chipset that either goes to the smartphone display or through the HDMI connection.

I'm not defending the cellular providers one bit, but there are technical differences.  If I use my iPhone to connect to T-Mobile 's LTE network and turn on the hotspot feature, the phone is effectively becoming a wireless modem that other devices can use to connect to the internet.  Instead of having a hard-lined cable signal directed to a cable modem that's connected to a wireless router, my iPhone is effectively both the modem and router, and instead of connecting to the cable provider's network through the hard line, the iPhone is connecting to an LTE cell phone tower.  Then if I use my smart TV to connect to the internet using the wifi network provided by my iPhone (rather than the wifi network provided by my wireless router that's set up through the cable modem) the smart TV is effectively "tethered" to the iPhone to gain access to the ENTIRE INTERNET.    Whether you listen with wired headphones or BT headphones, the headphones aren't tethered to the INTERNET.  

  You're arbitrarily re-defining what you are calling internet and making up technical differences that are not real technical differences.  The data stream is coming directly over the internet and being sent to the headphones (Sure, Pandora, etc is handling some of the control, although BT has some 2-way control methods).  When you tether a PC, the data's not always untouched either.  Some apps will repackage the packets to send them to the pc and back, the same as pandora or other app passing through the audio stream.  Sending to TV's is the same as speakers except it's picture data rather than just audio.  Not sure how you would argue the audio doesn't count but audio plus pictures does...  The only difference is that video is typically at higher data rates.


I don't know what you define as internet, but if it's sending ip packets, it's internet in a simple sense. If the packets stop at Pandora and music is sent to Bluetooth it's not internet anymore.

Skipping 43 Messages...
RedWolfe01 said:   
Bend3r said:   
cestmoi123 said:   
scrouds said:   Funny how large corporations have the right to choose their customers but a humble baker does not.
  That humble baker would absolutely have the right to choose not to serve an unprofitable customers.  They can't choose not to serve a customer because they're bigots, though, any more than T-Mobile could launch a new "whites only" price offering.

  Well, they actually can, just like the cell providers get away with not defining any terms for their obligations (Not even the cost the customer agrees to, it just sets out a minimum in the agreement, subject to surcharges increasing).  There's nothing forcing them to decorate cakes in ways that are requested.   And, just like the bad baker example, people are free to complain about it publicly and affect the reputation and future sales.  

Of course, the problem with applying that to cell service is the big four are largely a non-competitive cartel that sets pricing, terms, and services in lock-step, and has government protections and a huge barrier to entry for any new competition.   Plus, cell phone service is a utility, so the demand is somewhat inelastic if the cartel changes their terms or increases rates.  Sure, there are sometimes superficial back and forth disruptive changes (Tmo)...
ATT also got the supreme court to allow unilateral requirements for binding arbitration (along with other nonsense terms), which previously weren't allowed in contracts due to being decidedly one-sided.

  
Dude, give it up.  Its well defined in the terms, you just don't LIKE them.  Tethering is limited, they tell you EXACTLY what the limit is.  What "unlimited" REALLY means is that you won't ever get billed overage fees, not at what speed you will be served.

 

You misread what I said is not defined, I said the customer's limitations and obligations are defined but not the carriers'. No "tethering" is clearly in the terms in the new plans, and I would not advise someone to intentionally break their TOS.  That the underlying technology does not have any way to differentiate "tethering" traffic or that bluetooth headphones fit most carriers' broad definitions of "tethering" are separate issues.  Monthly Service fee is not well defined, there's an asterisk that they can increase their surcharges at any time with no advance notice. There's also no specific service obligations defined, such as coverage area or how congested towers are allowed to be before finally getting increased backhaul installed, and there are no financial remedies defined for customers affected by failure to provide the contracted services.

I never advised to use the service to replace their home internet, that's a poor plan for multiple reasons even ignoring tethering restrictions (Which the TMo plan referred to actually includes "unlimited" tethering, but of an unspecified amount....)



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2017