used '13 Focus Electric

Archived From: Finance
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
Thinking of buying a used '13 Focus Electric at a local dealer Ad Priced @ 8K .

Have free charging at work (which is 42 miles O/W)

It's going to go to auction on Monday, so how low I can go? (With gas prices dropping )



 

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
I wouldn't buy the 2017 Focus Electric new. They're releasing it at the same time as the 238 mile Chevy Bolt and the Bol... (more)

triggerhappy007 (Sep. 22, 2016 @ 11:53p) |

2018 if you are lucky.

xoneinax (Sep. 23, 2016 @ 5:16p) |

GM sounds sort of desperate.

xoneinax (Sep. 23, 2016 @ 5:35p) |

Staff Summary
  • Also categorized in:
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

As low as your local market allows based on the condition of the vehicle being auctioned.

MrSamsung said:   As low as your local market allows based on the condition of the vehicle being auctioned.
  I'm thinking 7K, doubt they'll get that much at auction with gas prices dropping. How much are auction fees for dealers vs. selling it to me?

this is what I do now for pricing cars:
find the closest car similar on http://www.offleaseonly.com/ (best price used wholesaler I know of)
adjust for year/mileage (more subjective)

i haven't been able to find people willing to match their prices, so I actually flew to FL to buy from them. however, you might get an individual to sell for this - dealers typically won't unless it's a trade-in, because they can get about the same at auction.


Off Lease Only Used Cars | Used Cars For Sale
Disclaimer
walletfart said:   this is what I do now for pricing cars:
find the closest car similar on http://www.offleaseonly.com/ (best price used wholesaler I know of)
adjust for year/mileage (more subjective)

i haven't been able to find people willing to match their prices, so I actually flew to FL to buy from them. however, you might get an individual to sell for this - dealers typically won't unless it's a trade-in, because they can get about the same at auction.

  
http://www.offleaseonly.com/used-car/ford-focus-electric-hatchba...

they're more expensive! So I guess it's a good deal

I just bought an off-lease Focus Electric 3 weeks ago in California. The most important question is how many miles does the car have on it. The battery loses its total capacity over time and as it's used. The degradation rate does have some variability to it but a 2013 model with 15,000 miles should be worth more than a 2014 model with 30,000 miles for example since there are no material differences in the car.

In my case I paid $10,300 before taxes for a 2013 model with 15,000 miles and leather that was Ford Certified Pre-Owned. The other extreme was a 2013 with 40,000 miles for $8,300 (probably could be negotiated down to $8,000). Even in the SF bay area there are only about 25 of these Focus Electrics for sale at any given time so supply is limited and presumably so is demand.

The only way I could justify the price of the Focus was for charging at work and because California gives you carpool lane access through the end of 2018.

I'm not sure what state you are in but the Focus will have enough range to get you to work one way even if it is highway driving, which depletes the battery much more than stop-and-go driving, because stop-and-go driving gets the benefit of regenerative braking.

If you're buying the electric car mostly for a return-on-investment perspective, other alternatives include the following:

(1) A used Leaf, I've seen 2011 and 2012 models for sale for under $7,000. Those are cloth interior, slow 3.3 Kwh charger, and old Leaf battery with high 25K+ mile cars but they should have enough juice to get you ~40 miles to work. 2013 cloth models with the improved battery and charge speed can be found in the $8K range.

(2) A 2016 lease on a Kia Soul or Leaf can get you a little more range at about 105 miles which should give you a round trip at work in case you can't find any chargers at work. Given the distance you drive each day, even a lease on a base model EV should pay off for you unless you're in a location with very low gas prices.

^ Thanks for the extremely informative post! I would nominate for best FWF answer in a while

I'm in AZ and worried about battery heat issues. Apparently the focus is better than the leaf with cooled batteries? Also focus looks like a regular car

Doing it for HOV access also and have charging at work also.

You're right they're all 2013 and off lease my options are

$8.5K for 29k miles

and

$8k for 40K

At what point would ford replace battery for degradation ? Apparently leaf did?

Ah, Arizona: I understand the Leaf reluctance now. Even though Ford offers an 8 year warranty on the battery, Ford does not have a stated battery capacity loss level for which they will replace the battery. This is one area where Nissan beats Ford. Just assume your battery will degrade a little bit over time (not as bad as some of the Leafs though) and that Ford won't replace it for degradation.

It sounds like you've done your research as well so you probably know that Nissan guarantees against battery degradation up to something like 20% loss for 5 years. One thing I read that some people do is to buy a 2012 or 2013 Leaf with a battery that has degraded past the replacement level or is about to degrade past that level and then they file a claim to get the replacement battery. The replacement batteries are more heat resistant (so-called Lizard batteries) and you'd have a new battery which is pretty awesome. I was too lazy to hunt for one of these cars but it's an option worth mentioning.

One other thing to point out: the Focus has a less efficient heater and air conditioner than 2013 or newer Leafs. The heater drains the battery pretty badly for me the few times I've tried it (probably 8-10 miles of range loss) while the AC a little less (perhaps 4-6 miles), just plain air from the vents (1-3 miles), and heated seats (1-2 miles).

With all that said, I chose the Focus over the Leaf for probably pretty similar reasons as you: styling was more my taste, better horsepower (140 HP vs. 105-ish on the Leaf), liquid-cooled battery, leather option a much cheaper premium vs. similarly styled Leafs, and the 240v charging is faster than Leafs.

Pre-2016 and Post-2012 Leafs beat Focus on the following: interior rear passenger space, rear trunk space, option for 30 minute fast charger on SL or SV trims, more efficient heater/AC, more commitment from manufacturer to electric cars.

If both of the off Lease Focus' that you listed are leather and otherwise the same, I'd probably choose the $8.5K one because it has about one year's fewer miles on it (10k miles). Make sure the dealer includes the 110v charger with the car. Those cost a couple hundred dollars and sometimes they forget to put it in the trunk.

In about 3-4 years when the 2017 leased Leafs, Bolts, and other EVs come off lease, we'll be seeing these 75 mile range EVs available for dirt cheap given their age and the fact that these 2017 model EVs will all have >100 mile ranges. That's when we plan to replace car #2 of 3 (keeping one ICE car for long distance driving) with another off-lease EV.

My research is not as detailed as yours Most Impressive Will check

hmm. if they do have a stated battery capacity loss level for which they will replace the battery, is 8 year warranty for complete failure only? Might consider the 2013 leaf

Unlike NorcCal Won't need heater in AZ except for a few days at best. Surprised it uses more than AC?? I guess combustion engines generate more heat so...

I would be buying used from a ford dealer if that makes a difference?

In a few years would trade the focus in for the Model 3 if/when it shows up



 

The 8 year warranty is for failure or other anomalous battery issues. Normal year-over-year degradation is excluded. There will be about 5 years of battery warranty left if you get a 2013 but I doubt you'll see any issues with the battery. 

My wild-ass guess on what type of range you'll see with a 40K mile 2013 model is worst case like 60-70 miles on a full charge and 80% freeway miles. You can actually calculate kWh used per miles using the My Ford Mobile app once you own the car to get a better idea of how much range you will have on your commute or you could do something like a 10-20 mile test drive and then do the math on kWh used. 

Here are my last three trips this weekend as an example: 

  • 1.0 kWh used on a 5.4 mile trip that was completely city/stop light driving (no more than 40 mph the whole trip). AC used whole trip. Flat elevation / No hills.
  • 2.3 kWh used on a 8.1 mile trip that was 80% freeway driving (up to 70 mph on freeway). No AC or heater used. No hills on trip. Flat elevation
  • 1.6 kWh used on a 6.4 mile trip that was 80% free driving. No AC or heater used. Flat elevation 

The Focus has a 23 kWh battery. 

  • The battery's range based on the first trip would be about 120 miles. That seems a little high but not totally unrealistic because of regenerative breaking. 
  • The battery's range based on the second trip would be about 81 miles. That also seems a little high but not too far out of whack. 
  • The battery's range based on the third trip would be about 94 miles. That also seems a little high but not too far out of whack. 

This is all on a 3 year old battery with 15,000 miles on it. 

I looked up the car you linked to in your post. Visually it looks really nice. I like the color and I can see the green trickle charger sticker peeking out of the trunk in the back so it is included. I don't think buying from a Ford dealer will confer any special advantage unless you get a Certified Pre-owned one. See if you can get the dealer to come down a few hundred dollars and to throw in new front and rear windshield wipers. Also check the tire tread because the tires will probably be your biggest expense owning an EV. The low maintenance / lack of oil changes, etc. is a great selling point that most people don't account for. 

Thankfully My commute is pretty flat, lots of stop and go even on fwy, so lots of regenerative breaking. Is there a way to get the My Ford Mobile app data from the car itself while test driving. I might ask for extended test drive


I'll definately negotiate armed with your info. Not much demand here in AZ  and it's going to auction tomorrow 

Would the CPO cover degradation? 


If ford dealer cant CPO. Then here's the other option https://www.carfax.com/VehicleHistory/p/Report.cfx?make=FORD&vin=50%7C49%7C22%7C49%7C-88%7C-16%7C82%7C-49%7C-124%7C-113%7C92%7C25%7C61%7C-10%7C-112%7C-45%7C-1%7C54%7C-112%7C78%7C22%7C-96%7C-122%7C105%7C&dealer_id=86549&car_id=438652661&partner=ATD_U  

Also curious why the dealer didn't complete recall. I did hear something about them having to send everything to CA for major issues...

I don't think CPO covers battery degradation.The only thing I really cared about regarding CPO was getting the 12-month bumper-to-bumper warranty. It minimized the amount of due diligence I had to do on the car because I knew if anything substantial was broken it would get fixed. I do think I paid $300-$500 more for my car because of the CPO designation but I thought the shopping time and angst saved was worth it.  

I like that second Focus. Even though I think the lighter interior is a little uglier, it probably does better in the sun than the darker one. I have a white Focus with the light interior as well. I'd try getting it for $8.0 - $8.2K if possible. Dealers always have a couple hundred dollar wiggle room at least. 

I wouldn't worry about the recall not being fixed if you're referencing the door latch recall. I'm not sure about it but I thought, at least out here in California, that all recalls had to be fixed by the dealer before the car could be resold. One dealer told me a story about a recall that came out a Leaf that he had in his inventory and he was pissed because it took Nissan months to get around to fixing it and he couldn't legally sell the car as a dealer until the fix was complete. This is getting outside my area of competency though so take it with grain of salt. 

Maybe a really dumb question (or maybe the ads are deceptive). But if I go to autotrader or cars.com there are lots of "new" 2016 electrics for around ~$22k (base model). With new there's the $7500 tax credit. So, does that mean the $10300 example someone gave for 3yrs old and 15k miles used car is only ~$4k discount from new car price? (Although maybe the 10300 wasn't a base model)

=13.12pxAfter I did the deal . The battery went down to 10 miles while they were detailing so I'm a bit worried. Lets see what happens when I talk to the service dept tomorrow. Do they have a battery guage for this at all dealers?


 

Just spoke to the previous owner I think I'm going to back out unless they replace some of the battery cellls.

He had range degradation of 10 miles /yr and it's down to 50 miles now full charge now

needhelpplease said:   Just spoke to the previous owner I think I'm going to back out unless they replace some of the battery cellls.

He had range degradation of 10 miles /yr and it's down to 50 miles now full charge now

  How did you find him?

alamo11 said:   
needhelpplease said:   Just spoke to the previous owner I think I'm going to back out unless they replace some of the battery cellls.

He had range degradation of 10 miles /yr and it's down to 50 miles now full charge now

  How did you find him?

  
Got lucky. His info was in the glove compartment. manual. He was happy to share info with me b/c he was mad at Ford 

The car is still there charging. They claimed it was a charger issue, but looks like it's the battery. 

Just checked and my chase CC has a lower limit so it should decline right? or should I proactively reduce further just in case.

Dealer's closed now  but can I use lemon law in case they play hard ball? 

needhelpplease said:   
alamo11 said:   
needhelpplease said:   Just spoke to the previous owner I think I'm going to back out unless they replace some of the battery cellls.

He had range degradation of 10 miles /yr and it's down to 50 miles now full charge now

  How did you find him?

  
Got lucky. His info was in the glove compartment.

The car is still there charging. They claimed it was a charger issue, but looks like it's the battery. 

Just checked and my chase CC has a lower limit so it should decline right? or should I proactively reduce further just in case.

Dealer's closed now  but can I use lemon law in case they play hard ball? 

  No, the Chase card may still go through. The banks often approves charges that are bigger than credit line as a courtesy. Call the bank and say the card was stolen. 
No lemon law on used cars. They are sold "as is"

alamo11 said:   
needhelpplease said:   
alamo11 said:   
needhelpplease said:   Just spoke to the previous owner I think I'm going to back out unless they replace some of the battery cellls.

He had range degradation of 10 miles /yr and it's down to 50 miles now full charge now

  How did you find him?

  
Got lucky. His info was in the glove compartment.

The car is still there charging. They claimed it was a charger issue, but looks like it's the battery. 

Just checked and my chase CC has a lower limit so it should decline right? or should I proactively reduce further just in case.

Dealer's closed now  but can I use lemon law in case they play hard ball? 

  No, the Chase card may still go through. The banks often approves charges that are bigger than credit line as a courtesy. Call the bank and say the card was stolen. 
No lemon law on used cars. They are sold "as is"

  
Even CPO warranty? (As is box is not marked)

I also told them to not process CC because I couldn't trade my wifes car without her there. CC was more of a deposit. Will calling the card stolen create more problems than directly addressing it?  



iI wIll call sales  director first thing in the AM. Any ammo would be most helpful 

ArubaMan said:   I just bought an off-lease Focus Electric 3 weeks ago in California. The most important question is how many miles does the car have on it. The battery loses its total capacity over time and as it's used. The degradation rate does have some variability to it but a 2013 model with 15,000 miles should be worth more than a 2014 model with 30,000 miles for example since there are no material differences in the car.

In my case I paid $10,300 before taxes for a 2013 model with 15,000 miles and leather that was Ford Certified Pre-Owned. The other extreme was a 2013 with 40,000 miles for $8,300 (probably could be negotiated down to $8,000). Even in the SF bay area there are only about 25 of these Focus Electrics for sale at any given time so supply is limited and presumably so is demand.

The only way I could justify the price of the Focus was for charging at work and because California gives you carpool lane access through the end of 2018.

I'm not sure what state you are in but the Focus will have enough range to get you to work one way even if it is highway driving, which depletes the battery much more than stop-and-go driving, because stop-and-go driving gets the benefit of regenerative braking.

If you're buying the electric car mostly for a return-on-investment perspective, other alternatives include the following:

(1) A used Leaf, I've seen 2011 and 2012 models for sale for under $7,000. Those are cloth interior, slow 3.3 Kwh charger, and old Leaf battery with high 25K+ mile cars but they should have enough juice to get you ~40 miles to work. 2013 cloth models with the improved battery and charge speed can be found in the $8K range.

(2) A 2016 lease on a Kia Soul or Leaf can get you a little more range at about 105 miles which should give you a round trip at work in case you can't find any chargers at work. Given the distance you drive each day, even a lease on a base model EV should pay off for you unless you're in a location with very low gas prices.

  
er, that isn't how the physics works for regenerative braking.  It doesn't created energy, it just recaptures it at a less efficient process.  The reason stop and go driving is more "efficient" is because you aren't driving as fast overall.  You will dump a lot more energy into acceleration and then get less than half of it back braking at highway speeds.

Going high speed with an electric motor isn't that efficient, due to friction and how gearing works for most motors.  Look at the tricks that "hypermilers" are using and you will get a decent idea how it works.  

^ The former owner did say he was driving mostly hwy at 75 mph, so I understand not getting stated range. It's the steep degradation that I'm concerned about. Esp. in AZ

RedWolfe01 said:   er, that isn't how the physics works for regenerative braking.  It doesn't created energy, it just recaptures it at a less efficient process.  The reason stop and go driving is more "efficient" is because you aren't driving as fast overall.  You will dump a lot more energy into acceleration and then get less than half of it back braking at highway speeds.

Going high speed with an electric motor isn't that efficient, due to friction and how gearing works for most motors.  Look at the tricks that "hypermilers" are using and you will get a decent idea how it works.  

  Highway should actually be pretty efficient, as long as you're not going way over 70 and not stop-go on highway.  70 is probably only ~10-15% hit on mpg from going 55.  As you rightly point out, stop-go on highway would be very inefficient (especially if there are "hard" stops.  The way ford's regen braking works is the "brakes" only engage if you depress the brake pedal past a certain amount or are under 3mph, and in all other cases the braking is all "regenerative".  On my fusion hybrid, I would get better on ~25mi highway route (avging probably 65)  to/from work as compared to surface street driving (~40mpg when the car was new, and it was rated 40city/36 highway).  Almost zero braking was necessary, though, I went at a pretty constant rate (But the ford system does have the car "always" using regen at a small extent, even when not pressing the brake pedal, but that's just a nuance of how it works.  So if you go on a completely flat route or slight downslope, the car will slow in speed faster than a car without regenerative braking will).  AC was also always blasting as it was TX, so "city" driving would have taken a bigger hit from the accessory power because the AC would be using a higher % of total power (because you are moving slower, so the AC would need to run for a longer duration per mile).

Going high speeds (dropoff starts usually over ~55 and gets much worse around 70-75mph) affecting fuel economy is not specific to electric motors.  Regular all-gas engine vehicles get less efficient there too.  The issue with gas vehicles, specifically with no regenerative braking or the start-stop technology that's in all the newer tech gas only engines, is that they are so much less efficient on "city" traffic that the highway speeds will always be so much "better" compared to the city driving even at the higher speeds.  But, if you compare one at a constant 55mph with no braking vs 75mph with no braking, you will likely see noticeably lower fuel economy at 75mph.  

The second reason it's not noticed is because the numbers in mpg are "smaller".  So, a hybrid you see go from 40 to 30, and most people see it as "10mpg loss! so much!  I'm losing 10mpg!!!".  On an older gas vehicle or a truck, it might go from 15 to 12mpg, and most people see it as "only 3mpg loss! that's not much, it's almost the same, I'm only losing 3mpg, unlike those stupid hybrids the hippies drive!".  gpm would be much more useful here.  40->30mpg is an increase of 0.0083gpm, while 15->12mpg is an increase of 0.0167gpm -- Or, roughly twice as large an increase.

Paid with a business CC. Their processing machines were down.  Chase  just allowed me to lower employee spending limit so ..."Spending Limit Successfully Updated"

Contract says they can come after me  for the" lost sale damages". Do dealers generally do? They did say car was going to auction and they took a big hit with the sale. 

Again iI wIll call sales  director first thing in the AM or go by. Any ammo would be most helpful  

Bend3r said:   
But, if you compare one at a constant 55mph with no braking vs 75mph with no braking, you will likely see noticeably lower fuel economy at 75mph.  

  Especially if you are driving through  air.

lp244 said:   
Bend3r said:   
But, if you compare one at a constant 55mph with no braking vs 75mph with no braking, you will likely see noticeably lower fuel economy at 75mph.  

  Especially if you are driving through  air.

  
Yeah, that was the friction thing I mentioned.    A lot of it is how they gear the cars- particularly a gasoline one.  There is a sweet spot in the powerband that makes FAR more difference than anything else.  The lower the RPM at the highest speed the more efficient you are going.  Back in the 70s/80s that was set to 55, I would guess its 70ish today.  Essentially it is where the gubmint tests economy and tweaked to max their testing results.  So drive like the EPA.  CVTs are more linear but they also have a range where they are most efficient.  I have two different bikes with CVTs and they ride TOTALLY different.  One has an engine over 50% larger and only runs about 10 MPH faster at the top end, it accelerates like a racehorse in the low end.     The other is more consistent, its band is much smoother and it gets noticeably better MPG.

It is acceleration that kills your economy.  But of course that is the most fun thing about bikes.... 

The most recent full electric I have tried you almost never USE the brake - its a one pedal fits all.  Pull your foot off and the vehicle slows very rapidly.  The brake is very much for emergencies only.  (this was an i3)

https://www.azag.gov/consumer/cars


REMEMBER: ARIZONA DOES NOT HAVE A “COOLING OFF” PERIOD OR THREE-DAY RIGHT TO CANCEL A CAR SALE.

jason745 said:   https://www.azag.gov/consumer/cars 


REMEMBER: ARIZONA DOES NOT HAVE A “COOLING OFF” PERIOD OR THREE-DAY RIGHT TO CANCEL A CAR SALE.

  
Thanks for the link. It also saysUsed cars in Arizona are sold with an implied warranty of merchantability that applies to every used car sale (although a specific defect may not be covered if it is spelled out in writing). This law is found at A.R.S. § 44-1267(link is external) .  The implied warranty lasts fifteen days or 500 miles, whichever comes first.  The dealer must be given two opportunities to repair the vehicle, before a consumer can seek a refund. USED CARYour car is covered by the Arizona Used Car Lemon Law if a major component of your car breaks before the earlier of 15 days or 500 miles after you buy the car.If it breaks, you’ll still have to pay up to $25 for the first two repairs.The recovery for the consumer is the purchase amount paid for the car.
PROBLEMS WITH YOUR TRANSACTIONIf your motor vehicle purchase involved deception or unfair practices that may have violated the Arizona Consumer Fraud Act, you should file a complaint with our office.   All complaints are forwarded to the business for response and many are resolved.   A pattern of complaints or egregious violations may lead to an investigation and/or lawsuit brought by the State against a business for Consumer Fraud.


If the car can't even leave the dealer's parking lot (apparently because the battery completely drained during the detail process )  is that not covered under implied warranty?  I will reach out to them this AM and  hopefully stop the titling process.
 

also THERE"S AN OUTSTANDING RECALL! I thought they couldn't sell cars with recalls??

Checked

https://vinrcl.safercar.gov/vin/vinLookup

ISN'T IT REAL TIME? I ASKED ABOUT THIS AND THEY SAID CARFAX HADN'T BEEN UPDATED YET AND THEY COULDN'T CPO IF THERE WAS A RECALL

09/01/2016 Ford Motor Company Manufacturer Safety recall issued
Recall #16S30 DOOR LATCH REPLACEMENT
Status: Remedy Not Yet Available
Vehicles
Car Seats
Tires
Equipment
Recalls by VIN
Recalls FAQ
Report Safety Problems
Vehicle (Online)
Vehicle (via PDF)
Non-Vehicle
Drive Safer
Technology
Driving Tips
Tires
Passenger Van Safety
Emergency Response Vehicles
Theft Prevention
Recalls Results by VIN - Vehicle Identification Number Print
Share
VIN: 1FADP3R47DL364379
Year: 2013 Make: FORD Model: Focus Electric
Number of Open Recalls: 1
NHTSA Recall Number: opens new window takes away from VIN lookup section> 16V643 Recall Date: September 2, 2016
Manufacturer Recall Number: 16S30
SUMMARY:
A DOOR LATCH WITH A FRACTURED PAWL SPRING TAB TYPICALLY RESULTS IN A "DOOR WILL NOT CLOSE" CONDITION. A DOOR THAT OPENS WHILE DRIVING INCREASES THE RISK OF INJURY. AS OF 9/2/16, FORD'S INVESTIGATION INTO THIS CONCERN HAS IDENTIFIED A TOTAL OF ONE ALLEGED ACCIDENT AND THREE ALLEGED INJURIES THAT FORD BELIEVES MAY BE RELATED. ONE ALLEGED INJURY WAS TO AN OCCUPANT'S ARM FROM A DOOR THAT REPORTEDLY OPENED AND BOUNCED BACK. ANOTHER INJURY INVOLVED A DRIVER WHO ALLEGED HER HAND WAS INJURED WHEN TRYING TO GRAB A DOOR THAT OPENED. THE THIRD INJURY WAS TO AN OCCUPANT WHO ALLEGEDLY RECEIVED SCRATCHES FROM A REAR DOOR THAT OPENED WHILE DRIVING. FORD HAS NO FURTHER INFORMATION RELATING TO THESE REPORTS. THE ALLEGED ACCIDENT OCCURRED AFTER THE DRIVER'S DOOR REPORTEDLY OPENED IN A PARKING LOT AND RESULTED IN BUMPER DAMAGE, BUT FORD HAS NO ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.
SAFETY RISK:
A DOOR LATCH WITH A FRACTURED PAWL SPRING TAB TYPICALLY RESULTS IN A "DOOR WILL NOT CLOSE" CONDITION. A DOOR THAT OPENS WHILE DRIVING INCREASES THE RISK OF INJURY.
REMEDY:
OWNERS WILL BE NOTIFIED BY MAIL AND INSTRUCTED TO TAKE THEIR VEHICLE TO A FORD OR LINCOLN DEALER TO HAVE ALL AFFECTED DOOR LATCHES REPLACED WITH A MORE ROBUST SERVICE PART. THERE WILL BE NO CHARGE FOR THIS SERVICE. PARTS AVAILABILITY IS PRESENTLY VERY LIMITED. IT IS RECOGNIZED THAT CERTAIN FACTORS AFFECT THE RATE OF REPORTS AND MAY BE USED IN PRIORITIZING THE PHASED MAILING OF REMEDY NOTIFICATIONS AS PARTS BECOME AVAILABLE. FORD PROVIDED THE GENERAL REIMBURSEMENT PLAN FOR THE COST OF REMEDIES PAID FOR BY VEHICLE OWNERS PRIOR TO NOTIFICATION OF A SAFETY RECALL TO THE AGENCY IN FEBRUARY 2015. THE ENDING DATE FOR REIMBURSEMENT ELIGIBILITY IS OCTOBER 31, 2016. FORD WILL FORWARD A COPY OF THE NOTIFICATION LETTERS TO DEALERS TO THE AGENCY WHEN AVAILABLE.
RECALL STATUS: Recall INCOMPLETE. Remedy not yet available
MANUFACTURER NOTES:
TO CHECK FOR NON-SAFETY-RELATED PROGRAMS APPLICABLE TO YOUR VEHICLE, SEE HTTP://WWW.FORD.COM/ OR CALL YOUR FORD DEALER.
If the manufacturer has failed or is unable to remedy this safety recall for your vehicle in a timely manner, please contact the NHTSA Vehicle Safety Hotline at: 1-888-327-4236 or TTY: 1-800-424-9153 or file an online complaint with NHTSA.
THIS RECALL DATA LAST REFRESHED: Sep 19, 2016
Additional Safety Information
Besides the VIN search tool you just used, NHTSA offers additional safety information based on a vehicle's make, model, and model year and not tied to any particular VIN. A search by vehicle make, model, and model year gives you access to information about technical service bulletins, NHTSA investigations, and owner complaints, as well as safety recalls on aftermarket equipment that is often not linked to a particular VIN or even to your vehicle's manufacturer.
To search NHTSA's safety information based on your vehicle's make, model, and model year, please go to the Safety Issues section opens new window and follow the instructions there.
Recall information for this manufacturer is only available going back to January 01, 1999. If your vehicle was manufactured before this date, please contact the manufacturer for possible additional recall information.
Enter another VIN here: Note: certain VINS will require the user to pick a Brand via radio button. These buttons will appear conditionally on the VIN you choosehelp
1FADP3R47DL364379

Submit
NHTSA.GOV 911.GOV DISTRACTION.GOV TRAFFICSAFETYMARKETING.GOV EMS.GOV
PoliciesTerms of UseUSA.govFOIAPrivacy PolicyAccessibilityCareersSite MapContact NHTSA
1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE, West Building Washington DC 20590 USA 1.888.327.4236 TTY 1.800.424.9153
This application works best in IE9 and above and recent versions of Firefox, Chrome and Safari.
United States Department of Transportation website. USA.gov website
1.0.15

Wow... Another "I went ahead and purchased a car" and now having second thoughts... You got the OTD price you wanted and now are nitpicking the car..

Enjoy your new car and use what warranty you have left to get the batteries replaced.

Just wanted to remark about the charging at work: is it a 110V outlet? If so and you're using the standard charger, the recharge rate is about 2-3 miles/hour which may not be sufficient for how long you're charging (you may have to set it in the car's options to charge at maximum power to get the full 12A/1440W charging from the supplied charger). 110V is fine at home IMO. The car's onboard charger can do up to 6.6kW which is what's found at a lot of commercial stations (ChargePoint for example) and will provide a full charge in about 4 hours. If the outlet at work is 220V, then you can use a 220V EVSE which will charge faster.

christoj879 said:   Just wanted to remark about the charging at work: is it a 110V outlet? If so and you're using the standard charger, the recharge rate is about 2-3 miles/hour which may not be sufficient for how long you're charging (you may have to set it in the car's options to charge at maximum power to get the full 12A/1440W charging from the supplied charger). 110V is fine at home IMO. The car's onboard charger can do up to 6.6kW which is what's found at a lot of commercial stations (ChargePoint for example) and will provide a full charge in about 4 hours. If the outlet at work is 220V, then you can use a 220V EVSE which will charge faster.
  

Good point. But the battery seems to have degraded to the point it's now longer even good one way.

If I can convince them to replace, would it be a greater capacity (today's model? )

I don't know. The warranty manual says it has an 8 year/100k mile warranty, but also says gradual range reduction is not covered. I don't know what their threshold for "gradual" is, but if you're at 50 miles now and the published range is 76, that's pretty bad.

ArubaMan's reply specifically called out higher mileage cars and battery range degradation. You still bought the car knowing it had 40k miles on the ODO, and that was going to affect battery charge level????

Did a window sticker or anyone ever claim a range prior to purchase? If so I'd use that to argue that 50 miles is unusable for you and you went off what the claimed range was.

Update from GM " Got our service director working on it now. Will keep you posted. Apologize for my shortness with you this morning and unless the battery is replaced we will not hold you to the deal" 

Q: Seems like the 2016 battery is still rated at 75 miles? So it's a problem down the road  The 2017 model, however, will have a 100-mile range. Maybe they can put in that battery if it's available/compatible?

About the charging at work it is a free 110V outlet so is the recharge rate is the recharge 3 miles/hour atleast on a new battery? I'm there for 8-9 hours and car can be plugged in.

We also have Blink stations that I have to pay full price for, unless someone here knows FWF deals on that?

[q=Stubtify;19636267 said]
Did a window sticker or anyone ever claim a range prior to purchase? If so I'd use that to argue that 50 miles is unusable for you and you went off what the claimed range was.


 
  

Yes they claimed the it was a charger issue after the test drive when the battery died down to 10 mile range (while I was in Finance dept) I know now it's dead cells. Also they claimed recall was complete and car fax was not updated.  That is when I called the previous owner, luckily he leased and  took it into service at the very same dealer. 


 


VoR said:   Lookout Below

http://blog.caranddriver.com/tesla-aside-resale-values-for-elect...

  

Great article
Re:
"Electric vehicles with battery cooling hold value. The batteries will last 20+ years and the car requires almost no maintenance of any kind. So if it meets your needs you have a great deal. 
New Electrics are improving so fast that you can get longer range faster charging EVs for a very low price when you figure life cycle costs. A hybrid or plugin hybrid just don't have the same savings. 
The amazing Chevy SPARK EV has been a best buy for years and the batteries never seem to lose any capacity. "

The Focus was supposed to have battery cooling, but I guess it doesn't work well here in AZ.

Anyone  know when the 2017 focus ev will be available? Is the battery available/ compatible with older models? 

I agree with ChristoJ. 

If your work only has a 110v outlet then you aren't going to get enough of a recharge at work to avoid having to do some charging at home or elsewhere. Your really want a 220v charger to get the fast 3-4 hr. charge in. 

You can search Plugshare.com or chargepoint.com to see most of the available outlets in your area. You'll also want to get a Chargepoint card because even the free chargepoint stations require a swipe of the card. 



 

Skipping 25 Messages...
needhelpplease said:   Although the GM claimed that they could "yank it out of a new focus"GM sounds sort of desperate.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2017