parking ticket while dropping off my daughter off for school bus dallas

Archived From: Finance
  • Text Only
Voting History
rated:
Today I got a parking ticket in the mail saying that I violate the "Parking BAN AM". I remember that on that day, I was dropping my daughter off at the school so that she can go to broad the school bus, and my car is stop less than 1 minutes when my daughter get out my car, while I am still in the car, (My car is not even put in park) I did see a officer from distance ticketing the other car and she turn and point a camera gun (I think) at my direction, but since I didn't park and she didn't signal me to stop, so I was hoping nothing happen until today that I get something in the mail about this supposed violation. I understand it may cost more the flight this, but in principal can any one just snap a picture and saying that you are parking and mail you a ticket, when you are not parking just drop off. Any advice?

Member Summary
Most Recent Posts
If said licensed taxi were picking up or discharging passengers where prohibited by posted signage, I would expect it wo... (more)

IMBoring25 (Sep. 20, 2016 @ 11:27p) |

unfortunately it's not the kids.  the kids don't care.  it's the parents that can't imagine their little snowflakes bein... (more)

MDfive21 (Sep. 21, 2016 @ 9:25a) |

Most kids would prefer to get to school while their parents are nowhere in sight.

beatme (Sep. 21, 2016 @ 9:53a) |

Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

Go to the court and explain the same thing to the prosecutor.

Thanks for the reply. That is what I am thinking, I didn't even receive a ticket until I get the reminder to pay fine. And it only give me until next week(5 business day) to pay the fine, because it probably assume the officer give me the ticket on the spot. However, how likely that I am going to win, also do they have to produce the evidence to show that the officer give me a ticket on the spot or have a picture showing that my car is park.

IANAL. But keep your explanation as minimal as possible. Don't mention never getting the original ticket, keep it super simple "I never got out of the car, I was dropping my daughter off at the bus. I was not parked. If you have a photo of the car you will see me sitting in the driver seat." First step is to figure out how to contest the parking ticket in the jurisdiction it was written in.

Here (not TX) parking ticket disputes are handled by the parking department first. I've found that from one city to the next there is a big difference between the level of consideration you can expect to get. Some of the good ones give you 1 'gimmie' a year; if I have even a remotely good excuse they'll dismiss the ticket on the spot. Others are firm that a car in a no parking area is in violation. Good luck. pls. Update

what's the actual law usually? If it's a no-parking zone and not marked to specifically allow drop-off, would "stopping the car for someone to get out and waiting for them to go board the bus" count as technically parking in violation of the law?

Bend3r said:   what's the actual law usually? If it's a no-parking zone and not marked to specifically allow drop-off, would "stopping the car for someone to get out and waiting for them to go board the bus" count as technically parking in violation of the law?
  OP probably needs to figure out if the location is also marked as "No Standing". If it's marked as No Standing, then OP's excuse probably won't get OP out of the ticket.

stanolshefski said:   
Bend3r said:   what's the actual law usually? If it's a no-parking zone and not marked to specifically allow drop-off, would "stopping the car for someone to get out and waiting for them to go board the bus" count as technically parking in violation of the law?
  OP probably needs to figure out if the location is also marked as "No Standing". If it's marked as No Standing, then OP's excuse probably won't get OP out of the ticket.

  If so, then the ticket was incorrectly written. I am not suggesting that there was no violation, just that the ticket does not reflect violation (assuming there was a no standing sign). Get pictures of the street and take it to a hearing if and when that occurs.

dumroo said:   
stanolshefski said:   
Bend3r said:   what's the actual law usually? If it's a no-parking zone and not marked to specifically allow drop-off, would "stopping the car for someone to get out and waiting for them to go board the bus" count as technically parking in violation of the law?
  OP probably needs to figure out if the location is also marked as "No Standing". If it's marked as No Standing, then OP's excuse probably won't get OP out of the ticket.

  If so, then the ticket was incorrectly written. I am not suggesting that there was no violation, just that the ticket does not reflect violation (assuming there was a no standing sign). Get pictures of the street and take it to a hearing if and when that occurs.

  Thanks for the good advice, I plan to go back tomorrow and take a picture of the sign and location, I don't believe there is "No Standing", but just want to make sure. Also the officer is from distance when this happen.  One other thing I have hyatt legal, will this better handle by them. (my previously experience is not that good for my stop sign ticket and my wife's speeding ticket with them, of course those two, we are in violation of the law, and this one, so I don't think I violate anything)

I am a bit confused. Why would you be dropping your daughter off AT school so she could board a bus? Why wouldn't she take the bus from near home, or just go into the school?

lonestarguy said:   I am a bit confused. Why would you be dropping your daughter off AT school so she could board a bus? Why wouldn't she take the bus from near home, or just go into the school?
  My daughter goes to a high school that is far away from the home. In Dallas, you can choose to go to this kind of high school instead of your home school.

op needs to post the sign and area around it

In Dallas you have to go to the Parking office in Oak Cliff to file a protest in person. The case officer will send someone to verify the signs, but its pretty hard to get out of a parking ticket.

In my case there were leftover signs from when the street was open, even though its permanently closed/dead-ended they still ticket you for parking where the stop sign used to be. They recently took one of the signs down, but not the other one.

At least the tickets are not too expensive and don't show up on your driving record.

Some areas allow you to dispute the ticket online. Once you file, you'll have access to the pictures (if any).

As far as I know, ALL (or most) parking enforcement officers are required to put the ticket on the vehicle (whether in wiper or on windshield depends where), and there are very specific rules regarding that.

Also, OP not being out of car helps. Distance of parking officer from vehicle is curious too.

How much is the ticket?

ticket is $45, but again, this is in principle, I don't like an officer can snap a picture from distance of your car and didn't even bother to come to me(which she sure has no time because the whole drop off takes less than 1 minutes and I am siting in the car) or give me a sign to stop to let me know and give me the ticket and explain to me. And later think that some one will just pay the fine because it is a small amount.

You were very likely in a zone that didn't allow stopping. your car being in stopped in drive, and stopped in park are the same thing. Very similar to red light cameras, which Dallas still has I think.

Be courteous and pull over next time, instead of blocking the road/traffic.

ArmchairArchitect said:   Be courteous and pull over next time, instead of blocking the road/traffic.
  If OP was blocking the road/traffic, I'm pretty sure the officer would have asked him/her to move their vehicle.

The red zone has always been for loading and unloading. There's never stopping in a white zone.

Airplane! quote notwithstanding, unless something is specifically designated as a loading zone, No Parking usually means there's some reason the municipality doesn't want cars stopped in that area. Per Texas Title 7 Ch 682, ordinances can be established prohibiting parking or stopping. The sign should cite an ordinance and it should match what's on the ticket. Look up the ordinance and judge for yourself if you violated it. If you did, vague signage is your only hope, and that's probably less than a 50/50 shot.

Not worth the aggravation for $45.  It doesn't go on your "permanent record".  Put the bill on the kitchen counter until tomorrow, then
put in a check, drop it in the mail and forget about it.

miaojian said:     Thanks for the good advice, I plan to go back tomorrow and take a picture of the sign and location, I don't believe there is "No Standing", but just want to make sure.
 

Did you take a picture of the signs when you dropped her off today?

miaojian said:   ..., but in principal can any one just snap a picture and saying that you are parking and mail you a ticket, when you are not parking just drop off. Any advice?
  
What do your local laws say?
In principal yes they can snap a picture of you and mail you a ticket.    Do you have red light cameras in your area?     Thats how red light cameras work, but there isn't even a person making the decision so the cameras can be even worse.    You aren't necessarily legally entitled to have a human hand you a ticket and explain things to you.

Were you parking illegally?     That depends on what is defined as 'standing' versus 'parking'.   Is standing allowed?   

IANAL but I found this in the Dallas city code: 

"SEC. 28-76.3.   PARKING BAN.
   A person commits an offense if, during a parking ban, he stops, stands, or parks a vehicle along a curb of a street posted conspicuously with signs indicating the parking ban.  (Ord. 20012)"

So if I understand that right and it applies here then merely stopping is enough to get fined.

 

stopping on the street to let your kid out is dangerous and disrupts traffic flows. that's why the cop was there in the first place. i'm sure at the beginning of every year, they have to crack down on newbies who do this.

go through the drive through like everyone else, or do the drop-off somewhere off the main drag. you were inconveniencing everyone else so that you could have the convenience of saving a minute or two.

ticket deserved.





(but you should still fight it, cause wtf this is FWF)

While it's only a minute for you, there are likely dozens of other parents doing the same thing in the morning which causes traffic and makes for a dangerous situation. If you want to talk strictly on principle it sounds like you are in the wrong and should pay the ticket. It doesn't matter if the officer was 5 feet away or 500 feet, if they saw you breaking the law, you should be fined.

dumroo said:   
stanolshefski said:   
Bend3r said:   what's the actual law usually? If it's a no-parking zone and not marked to specifically allow drop-off, would "stopping the car for someone to get out and waiting for them to go board the bus" count as technically parking in violation of the law?
  OP probably needs to figure out if the location is also marked as "No Standing". If it's marked as No Standing, then OP's excuse probably won't get OP out of the ticket.

  If so, then the ticket was incorrectly written. I am not suggesting that there was no violation, just that the ticket does not reflect violation (assuming there was a no standing sign). Get pictures of the street and take it to a hearing if and when that occurs.

I agree that it would be mis-written, but OP might lose a challenge when OP admits they committed another non-moving violation (that probably has the same fine).

fwuser12 said:   
miaojian said:     Thanks for the good advice, I plan to go back tomorrow and take a picture of the sign and location, I don't believe there is "No Standing", but just want to make sure.
Did you take a picture of the signs when you dropped her off today?

Wait for the second parking ticket to show up in a couple weeks, for when he got out of the car to take the picture...

So if you are not allowed to stop, how do you drop off a kid at a bus stop? Slow down, open the door, and push him/her out?

My teen son would think that's cool.

computerquest said:   So if you are not allowed to stop, how do you drop off a kid at a bus stop? Slow down, open the door, and push him/her out?

My teen son would think that's cool.

Drop them off at a nearby place where it is legal to stop.

miaojian said:   Today I got a parking ticket in the mail saying that I violate the "Parking BAN AM". I remember that on that day, I was dropping my daughter off at the school so that she can go to broad the school bus, and my car is stop less than 1 minutes when my daughter get out my car, while I am still in the car, (My car is not even put in park) I did see a officer from distance ticketing the other car and she turn and point a camera gun (I think) at my direction, but since I didn't park and she didn't signal me to stop, so I was hoping nothing happen until today that I get something in the mail about this supposed violation. I understand it may cost more the flight this, but in principal can any one just snap a picture and saying that you are parking and mail you a ticket, when you are not parking just drop off. Any advice?
Quoting in case it 'vanishes'

computerquest said:   So if you are not allowed to stop, how do you drop off a kid at a bus stop? Slow down, open the door, and push him/her out?

My teen son would think that's cool.

You drop her off at the designated drop-off area. I'm assuming the problem is OP didn't want to wait in line.

Thanks for all the reply. I just follow the flow, most of the car drop the kid off that way, there is construction at that school so it is kind of mess on where kids should be drop off. by the way, I didn't block any people/car, because the road is wide enough to allow other cars to pass by, more over I stop for <1 mins to allow my kid get out. but any way, I come back and see the sign again, and under the no parking, there is small no standing in the sign. so based on the above mention and what I search on the web, it looks like that I most likely have to pay the ticket.

You can still fight it.

Look up your states standards for signs. There should be a minimum sig text height standard. Then measure the no standing text and see if it complies with your state standards.

miaojian said:   Thanks for all the reply. I just follow the flow, most of the car drop the kid off that way, there is construction at that school so it is kind of mess on where kids should be drop off. by the way, I didn't block any people/car, because the road is wide enough to allow other cars to pass by, more over I stop for <1 mins to allow my kid get out. but any way, I come back and see the sign again, and under the no parking, there is small no standing in the sign. so based on the above mention and what I search on the web, it looks like that I most likely have to pay the ticket.
  
Just be thankful that you were able to get your child into one of the magnet schools and pay the ticket.

On my commute to work, I pass an elementary school. They have strict drop off rules.

A handful of parents every morning ignore the drop off rules and stop at the nearest intersection to let their kids off. It's dangerous, illegal and backs up traffic. However, it prevents them from having to wait in the drop off line. I'm sure they think because they don't get out of the car, that it's perfectly legal to stop. It's not.

Follow the rules, deadbeat.

BostonOne said:   On my commute to work, I pass an elementary school. They have strict drop off rules.

A handful of parents every morning ignore the drop off rules and stop at the nearest intersection to let their kids off. It's dangerous, illegal and backs up traffic. However, it prevents them from having to wait in the drop off line. I'm sure they think because they don't get out of the car, that it's perfectly legal to stop. It's not.

Follow the rules, deadbeat.

From a purely legal standpoint, how is that particular intersection where the cars stop any different than any other intersection where vehicles might stop to drop off or pick up passengers?  Close proximity to a school does not necessarily invoke special rules for a particular intersection.  Is this activity occurring in a distinct no stopping/no standing zone?

Are any of the children allowed to walk to school?  If so, do they ever cross the street at the intersection in question?  If some children are routinely walking through this intersection, what difference does it make, in a strict legal sense, whether they arrived at the intersection on foot or in a motor vehicle?  Are there any special signs in or around this intersection that make it distinct and different than a typical, ordinary intersection?  Is the school on a street in a neighborhood or on a more isolated campus?

I know a retired teacher who used to organize bus trips for profit to Hershey Park, and he would recruit students for the trips by handing out fliers as students arrived at school.  This was not a school-sanctioned event, so he wasn't allowed to distribute the fliers on school grounds.  However, the school was in a neighborhood only a few feet away from a public street.  The school principal gave him a hard time when he was handing out the fliers on the public sidewalk outside the fence that protects the perimeter of the entire school building, claiming that during school hours, the sidewalk is technically under the domain of the school administration.  So the teacher stepped into the gutter between two parked cars and proceeded to hand out the fliers to students.

It's like when a professional athlete gets suspended and then buys his way into the event with a standard admission ticket.  He's not granted any special access above and beyond what's allowed for his paid ticket, but he's allowed into the stadium, as any other patron would be.  It's a technicality.  Some might say it's a loophole.  The same idea can be applied to driving regulations.

DTASFAB said:   
 
From a purely legal standpoint, how is that particular intersection where the cars stop any different than any other intersection where vehicles might stop to drop off or pick up passengers?  Close proximity to a school does not necessarily invoke special rules for a particular intersection.  Is this activity occurring in a distinct no stopping/no standing zone?

Are any of the children allowed to walk to school?  If so, do they ever cross the street at the intersection in question?  If some children are routinely walking through this intersection, what difference does it make, in a strict legal sense, whether they arrived at the intersection on foot or in a motor vehicle?  Are there any special signs in or around this intersection that make it distinct and different than a typical, ordinary intersection?  Is the school on a street in a neighborhood or on a more isolated campus?

I know a retired teacher who used to organize bus trips for profit to Hershey Park, and he would recruit students for the trips by handing out fliers as students arrived at school.  This was not a school-sanctioned event, so he wasn't allowed to distribute the fliers on school grounds.  However, the school was in a neighborhood only a few feet away from a public street.  The school principal gave him a hard time when he was handing out the fliers on the public sidewalk outside the fence that protects the perimeter of the entire school building, claiming that during school hours, the sidewalk is technically under the domain of the school administration.  So the teacher stepped into the gutter between two parked cars and proceeded to hand out the fliers to students.

It's like when a professional athlete gets suspended and then buys his way into the event with a standard admission ticket.  He's not granted any special access above and beyond what's allowed for his paid ticket, but he's allowed into the stadium, as any other patron would be.  It's a technicality.  Some might say it's a loophole.  The same idea can be applied to driving regulations.

  

Lingering at an intersection while operating a motor vehicle might violate a code.   Now if you were to drop off your kid while a car in front of you was lingering, then you wouldn't necessarily be doing anything illegal.  It can make sense for many parents to drop off their kids at one intersection, since technically only the first stopped vehicle is violating an anti-lingering law.

Or if the light was not in their favor.

Seems that at least in WA and OR that stopping your car to pickup or discharge a passenger is legal.
WA: http://app.leg.wa.gov/RCW/default.aspx?cite=46.61.570
OR: http://www.oregonlaws.org/ors/811.550

I would have thought it would be illegal in general to just stop your car and let someone out, but they make it an explicit exemption to the laws about stopping / standing.

DTASFAB said:   
BostonOne said:   On my commute to work, I pass an elementary school. They have strict drop off rules.

A handful of parents every morning ignore the drop off rules and stop at the nearest intersection to let their kids off. It's dangerous, illegal and backs up traffic. However, it prevents them from having to wait in the drop off line. I'm sure they think because they don't get out of the car, that it's perfectly legal to stop. It's not.

Follow the rules, deadbeat.

From a purely legal standpoint, how is that particular intersection where the cars stop any different than any other intersection where vehicles might stop to drop off or pick up passengers?  Close proximity to a school does not necessarily invoke special rules for a particular intersection.  Is this activity occurring in a distinct no stopping/no standing zone?

Are any of the children allowed to walk to school?  If so, do they ever cross the street at the intersection in question?  If some children are routinely walking through this intersection, what difference does it make, in a strict legal sense, whether they arrived at the intersection on foot or in a motor vehicle?  Are there any special signs in or around this intersection that make it distinct and different than a typical, ordinary intersection?  Is the school on a street in a neighborhood or on a more isolated campus?

I know a retired teacher who used to organize bus trips for profit to Hershey Park, and he would recruit students for the trips by handing out fliers as students arrived at school.  This was not a school-sanctioned event, so he wasn't allowed to distribute the fliers on school grounds.  However, the school was in a neighborhood only a few feet away from a public street.  The school principal gave him a hard time when he was handing out the fliers on the public sidewalk outside the fence that protects the perimeter of the entire school building, claiming that during school hours, the sidewalk is technically under the domain of the school administration.  So the teacher stepped into the gutter between two parked cars and proceeded to hand out the fliers to students.

It's like when a professional athlete gets suspended and then buys his way into the event with a standard admission ticket.  He's not granted any special access above and beyond what's allowed for his paid ticket, but he's allowed into the stadium, as any other patron would be.  It's a technicality.  Some might say it's a loophole.  The same idea can be applied to driving regulations.

There are No Stopping/Standing signs at on all the streets/intersections near the school, so it is clearly illegal. It is poorly enforced, however.

ETA: No stopping here means no stopping for almost any reason, including momentary pick-up/drop-off.

Skipping 10 Messages...
MDfive21 said:   
jagec said:   
computerquest said:   So if you are not allowed to stop, how do you drop off a kid at a bus stop? Slow down, open the door, and push him/her out?

My teen son would think that's cool.

Back in my day we used to walk to bus stops, but I understand that today's children quake with fear at the thought of spending more than 3 seconds outside.

unfortunately it's not the kids.  the kids don't care.  it's the parents that can't imagine their little snowflakes being inconvenienced for more than 3 seconds.  

  
Most kids would prefer to get to school while their parents are nowhere in sight.



Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2017