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Somebody opened CCs with two different providers in the last 48 hours using my correct SSN, current cell #, but an address from 2012 and a different email.
I'm taking all the advised precautions: Fraud warnings and credit reporting agencies, police report, etc.

I am curious how they would profit without physically intercepting the cards, which would be mailed to my old address?
They wouldn't know the card #s without the physical cards. Would SSN alone let them set up an online account to do billpay or /balance transfer?

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Our nation needs to take identity theft seriously. It will hurt how our economy functions. Hackers took over my emails a... (more)

JOVIAL (Oct. 07, 2016 @ 11:49p) |

Why not create a new FW account with a new email?

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online purchases

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Consider some alert services if not LifeLock. I thought I read paying members of AOL are now benefiting as part of the paid service. You should check into it. Many of the homeowner home insurances offer ID theft allowances if not the service. That may help if you are out of pocket.
If you have not done so, contact those known card issuers and have the cards blocked. You may want to consider freezing the credit bureau reports including some of the lesser known ones.
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/credit-bureaus/
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/?s=credit+bureau
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/credit-bureaus/which-credit-bureau...
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/two-credit-bureaus-you-should-free...
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/consumer-reporting-agencies-make-c...
https://www.earlywarning.com/consumer-information.html

Check out Check Systems for banks, but do not depend on that. They do not list on my report half the banks that I have accounts at.
http://www.doctorofcredit.com/an-introduction-to-chexsystems-inc...

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xoneinax said:   online purchases
I can't think of any online purchases I've made without the CCV and I've never seen that anywhere except the physical card. How many sites out there allow purchases without the CCV?

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some cards will give you an online number and ccv code to use before the card arrives in the mail.
they also could have planned on smashing your old mailbox and getting it, be working with a mailman etc

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Maybe they are residents in your old address.

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I think some people are so excited about CSR they are stealing identities just to sign up strangers for it.

Your new metal card should be in the mail tomorrow, and your priority passes in 2 weeks. They also overstated your income on the application and got you a fat $45k limit.

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a thief could go to your old address, presenting a fake ID (in your name) and telling current occupants that "stupid" CC companies sent replacement cards to your old address.

or thief could apply for CC's at banks known to do expedited shipping by UPS/Fedex (with "no signature req."). UPS/Fedex generally drop off "expedited" shipments during morning or afternoon (while people are working).
so watch the old address for a few hours, over 1 or 2 days, swiping the packages shortly after their arrival.

subsequently use a cell-# spoofer to activate the CC's. then roll into a Best Buy (or similar), purchasing 1 or 2 popular items (with 1 CC). sell them for a significant discount. then go to a different electronics store, purchasing 1 or 2 more popular items (with the 2nd CC). sell them. follow that process 1 or 2 more times. then ditch the CC's.  naturally rinse & repeat.

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When I moved last the truck broke down and not everything was moved out of the garage by closing time. At 6AM the buyer smashed some of my lawn furniture with a pickaxe and threatened to call the cops on me.

I get a nice visual imagining identity thieves trying to pose as me with that basketcase.

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Are you 100% sure the cards where mailed to your 2012 address, or did they just use that address as an old address and the cards are being mailed somewhere else as a new address?  Last time I applied for a credit card, when I was less then 2 years in my current address, they took the old address and accepted the new address I entered as gospel because I knew all the other information on my credit report.  They could be having the cards mailed to some mail drop some place.

Since you caught it early, hopefully the cards won't be active when they get delivered.  My addresses, SSN, DoB, etc have been compromised in so many places over the years (Insurance companies, OPM, State Tax, etc breeches) that I just assume it's available to anyone and everyone.  That's why I keep my credit reports FROZEN.  Whatever pain I have to go through to open a new account is trivial compared to the pain of dealing with Identity Theft.

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Are they Wells Fargo accounts?  

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Fraud prevention at Discover and Chase said the applications were submitted with my old physical address on the form. That raised flags with Discover and they called me. Chase had already approved the application and were mailing out cards.

I got my cell # in 2011 and moved in 2012, so at least I have a window for when the data was collected.

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Maybe they filed a change-of-address form in hopes the cards would be forwarded.

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Somebody at the old address found something (paper) with that information on it and JACKPOT . They went for it?

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tightpapa said:   Somebody at the old address found something (paper) with that information on it and JACKPOT . They went for it?
  I would actually be more comfortable with that. Then the information might be limited to one person, not some file that could be sold and distributed at will.
 

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supersnoop00 said:   Maybe they filed a change-of-address form in hopes the cards would be forwarded.
  Either they try to forward it, or they assume the current resident will just toss it in the trash, and they can change the account address online (sometimes you can enroll after submitting the application) then later request a replacement card sent to the new address.

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gtstinger said:   When I moved last the truck broke down and not everything was moved out of the garage by closing time. At 6AM the buyer smashed some of my lawn furniture with a pickaxe and threatened to call the cops on me.
 


Did you call his bluff by calling the cops on HIM?

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Amazon and many others don't require cvv (for some wacky reason)

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This is a pet peeve of mine.

What happened here is "Identity Fraud", not "Identity Theft". The banks perpetuate this myth trying to convince you it's your problem and not theirs.

Sandra Bullock's character in The Net suffered identity theft.

What happened here is someone attempted to defraud a bank in an attempt to rob them.

The best course of action is to read up and learn your rights. You are not responsible for the bank's losses should someone succeed in fraudulently opening accounts. Use CreditKarma (I have been getting the hard pull emails within about a day) or use whichever service makes you feel comfortable monitoring your Consumer Reports for activity and promptly send WRITTEN disputes for anything that is not yours.

That said, most thieves tend to hit it hard, then run. It's uncommon for them to try to tap the same well too many times to avoid getting caught.

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Go to http://www.clark.com/ which is the site for Clark Howard, a national syndicated financial and common sense talk show host. Search his site for Credit Freeze. The alerts and credit monitoring sites warn you if there is a suspected problem. A Credit Freeze PREVENTS someone from opening a credit line in your name. Clark has information on how to do the Credit Freeze and information if there is a charge, up to $10 per each of 3 credit bureaus, in your state.

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gatzdon said:   This is a pet peeve of mine.

What happened here is "Identity Fraud", not "Identity Theft". The banks perpetuate this myth trying to convince you it's your problem and not theirs.

What happened here is someone attempted to defraud a bank in an attempt to rob them.

 

  
My peeve too.
"This account you put on my bureaus is not mine, I never opened it nor had anything to do with it"
"Then you need to file a police report and give us a copy before we can do anything"
"Nobody stole anything from me but my good reputation. Do you really expect the police to do anything when I tell them your bank is spreading lies about me? If somebody defrauded the bank, the bank needs to file a police report about it, not me.
"Either retract the lies within ten days or I'm filing suit. That's what YOU need to do."

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JW10 said:   Consider some alert services if not LifeLock. 
  
I'm not sure I can recommend the same, JW.

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gtstinger said:   When I moved last the truck broke down and not everything was moved out of the garage by closing time. At 6AM the buyer smashed some of my lawn furniture with a pickaxe and threatened to call the cops on me.

I get a nice visual imagining identity thieves trying to pose as me with that basketcase.

  Hold it,

You have a psycho living in your old house and it doesn't occur to you it might be HIM who is stealing your identity?

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taxmantoo said:   Do you really expect the police to do anything when I tell them your bank is spreading lies about me? If somebody defrauded the bank, the bank needs to file a police report about it, not me.
 

  
They don't expect the police to do anything, they ask the consumer to file a police report as a validation check to prevent false statements by the consumer, since there are serious penalties for filing a false police report. Many police agencies will take a report online or on a form without having to interact directly with an officer.

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Maybe the current Tenant got a hold of your Social Security statement it has all your info on it, they mail mine every year to my house.

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When I opened my Amex yesterday it gave me an instant approval and asked if I wanted the card number immediately - I clicked yes and was given all the information including the code on the card.

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DrenePr said:   Maybe the current Tenant got a hold of your Social Security statement it has all your info on it, they mail mine every year to my house.
  I thought they stopped paper mailing of SS statements sometime back; you can get all the info. from their website.

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Another site with a lot of info about what to do in this sort of situation is Krebsonsecurity.com (look at the list in the right sidebar for the most-popular articles - there are about 3 that pertain to your situation).

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gtstinger said:   Somebody opened CCs with two different providers in the last 48 hours using my correct SSN, current cell #, but an address from 2012 and a different email.
 

You might have explained already in the thread, but how did you find this information out so quickly if they used a different email account and mailing address?  

Were you already in a credit-monitoring program?

(...even then, I have a relative in a credit-monitoring program and they didn't let him know for 2 weeks that a new card had been opened in his name, so that wasn't good for much.)
 

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gtstinger said:   When I moved last the truck broke down and not everything was moved out of the garage by closing time. At 6AM the buyer smashed some of my lawn furniture with a pickaxe and threatened to call the cops on me.

I get a nice visual imagining identity thieves trying to pose as me with that basketcase.

  Maybe his teenager recently got into meth.

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skarydrunkguy said:   Amazon and many others don't require cvv (for some wacky reason)
They wouldn't be able to offer 1-click, and customers would have to get their card or memorize the number to complete each purchase.
As well, they already receive a cheap rate for accepting cards due to their volume.  It wouldn't go down much (or any) by requiring the code.
   

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Interesting - I just received a Amazon Visa card I did not apply for. On the phone with Chase now - fraud department. 

Came to my home address and had correct info on it. 

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Today i received a card from Capital One which i did not apply for. I had to freeze my credit report in all three agencies

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Our nation needs to take identity theft seriously. It will hurt how our economy functions. Hackers took over my emails and Microsoft and Google could not help me get them back. I got my calls forwarded to another unknown number so they can verify to the banks when they do their criminal activities. I now longer trust my emails and online transactions. Criminals found back doors to my accounts and nothing is safe. I'm going back to my parents' old days with paper transactions.
I've been very proactive and worked with the police. There are search warrants after these criminals. I hope they catch them all and bring all those responsible to jail.
To make matters worse, fatwallet has my hacked email still in their system. I can change my hacked email name but by doing so, fatwallet will notified my hacked emailer that I'm changing the email. Thus, this will be my last post on this forum. Good bye.

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JOVIAL said:   Our nation needs to take identity theft seriously. It will hurt how our economy functions. Hackers took over my emails and Microsoft and Google could not help me get them back. I got my calls forwarded to another unknown number so they can verify to the banks when they do their criminal activities. I now longer trust my emails and online transactions. Criminals found back doors to my accounts and nothing is safe. I'm going back to my parents' old days with paper transactions.
I've been very proactive and worked with the police. There are search warrants after these criminals. I hope they catch them all and bring all those responsible to jail.
To make matters worse, fatwallet has my hacked email still in their system. I can change my hacked email name but by doing so, fatwallet will notified my hacked emailer that I'm changing the email. Thus, this will be my last post on this forum. Good bye.

  Why not create a new FW account with a new email?

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taxmantoo said:   
gatzdon said:   This is a pet peeve of mine.

What happened here is "Identity Fraud", not "Identity Theft". The banks perpetuate this myth trying to convince you it's your problem and not theirs.

What happened here is someone attempted to defraud a bank in an attempt to rob them.

 

  
My peeve too.
"This account you put on my bureaus is not mine, I never opened it nor had anything to do with it"
"Then you need to file a police report and give us a copy before we can do anything"
"Nobody stole anything from me but my good reputation. Do you really expect the police to do anything when I tell them your bank is spreading lies about me? If somebody defrauded the bank, the bank needs to file a police report about it, not me.
"Either retract the lies within ten days or I'm filing suit. That's what YOU need to do."

  Something similar happened to me also. I received a bill from Verizon, new credit cards from Kohls/Bluebird, and online credit reports show a Toysrus credit card with $1500 spent on it. I am following the steps outlined in the FTC guideline.

The approach that taxmantoo referred to. Does this actually work. If so, how do I go about it.  

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