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rated:
I recently purchased a new vehicle and towards the end of the signing process, was sold a "Vehicle Service contract". I was a unsure about the value of such a contract and understood the heavy sell that was going on but did end up buying it (with the understanding that it can be cancelled for a prorated refund).

Here is a link to the plan description: http://www.firstmilewarranty.com/products/vehicle-service-contra...
Link to full contract: http://www.firstmilewarranty.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/TWS-...

Some details about my purchase:
Vehicle: Honda CRV
Contract length: 84 months/70k miles
Price: $1400.
Plan: Platinum
Deductible: $100

Questions:
1. Is there any value to these plans, particularly in the long run? Does it make sense for a reasonable price and/or for specific situations or are these plans just difficult to make any meaningful claims on when needed. I understand that this product might be a big profit margin for the dealer/provider.
2. I am currently reading the full contract. Quite a few things are different (to put it politely) than what I was told. Cancellations and refunds are addressed in Section VIII, #9. It indicates that cancellation within 60 days are fully refundable (as long as no claims made). Any experience about filing for a cancellation/refund on such a plan?

Any other input or consideration based on your experience will be appreciated.

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rated:
I'll share my experience (cliff notes are that it's likely not worth it).

I bought a Toyota truck and was offered the warranty and purchased it with the knowledge I could cancel within a few weeks or days.  The first red flag is they came down 50% when I first said I didn't want it.  Sure enough when I get home I find that I can get a better official Toyota warranty at a third of the price than this warranty offered by the dealership.  So I go back to the dealership to cancel, I'm basically told that I'm a fool for turning down this great warranty and it's inferred that the dealership wouldn't honor the warranty I did buy (it's a genuine Toyota warranty, I assure him they would honor it or have to deal with Toyota).

The warranty was for 100k miles and once I hit 90k I had a couple of things go wrong, I used the warranty twice and it included rental car reimbursement.  My warranty was $575 and charges covered were about $400 so technically it was not worth it but I would absolutely do this warranty again if I bought another Toyota.  OP's warranty is far too expensive, you should go back to dealer and cancel it as soon as possible.  Check online for a genuine Honda factory, but at $1400 I'd be comfortable going without a warranty.

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It's all about what you are comfortable with. The first question is how long will you keep the car? Also take note if the extended warranty starts after the normal warranty or starts from the day of purchase.

With my last vehicle I was very tempted to buy the extended warranty mostly due to all the electronics in cars these days. Just to replace the NAV unit in my truck would cost over $3k. If you do get the extended warranty make sure you choose the plan that includes electronics.

Before you do anything check on-line. At least with Ford, you can buy the extended warranty from any Ford dealer - there are a few where you can buy it on-line at a significant savings for the same exact thing - close to 1/2 the price my dealer was offering it for. Or check on-line then haggle with them if you want it - the price on these warranties is negotiable.

From what I understand there is a huge profit for the dealer on these - and they will put the pressure on you as the very last thing before you sign in hopes that you are excited about your new car and will easily agree.

Do your research first - take a look on-line to see if Honda does the same as Ford with this.

rated:
Cancel your warranty and buy Honda Care from Hyannis Honda or Saccucci Honda. There may be a couple others I am not thinking of. Honda Care is accepted at all Honda dealers. When I checked a couple years ago, Hyannis had a special discount if you had never bought Honda care for your car. So if the contract you are cancelling is Honda Care, it may be better to co with Saccucci or one of the others.

https://www.saccuccihondacare.com

http://hyannishondacare.com

rated:
Manufacturer extended warranties (like Honda Care) MIGHT be worth it, depends on your risk tolerance. Third party extended service contracts are almost never worth it (unless you're REALLY risk-averse). I agree with string3599 above - cancel this, and if you want an extended warranty, get a Honda Care. Any dealer can sell it (over the phone or online), and there are several online that do so at big discounts to list price.

rated:
1) Never buy from the dealer that sold your car (unless they price match/beat the lowest price you found elsewhere for the exact same one).
2) Never buy a non-manufacture backed warranty
3) Always ignore everything they tell you about the warranty. Get a copy of the actual warranty and read it. Note everything that is covered or excluded. Assume everything they say about the warranty is a lie unless its in the contract.
4) Make sure you normally keep cars long enough that it will be worth it. Do not buy a warranty longer than you need because you can transfer it. You can only transfer(if allowed) on a private party sale, and even then you won't get any more for your car than without.

Just my personal opinions!

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fwuser12 said:   2. I am currently reading the full contract. Quite a few things are different (to put it politely) than what I was told. Cancellations and refunds are addressed in Section VIII, #9. It indicates that cancellation within 60 days are fully refundable (as long as no claims made). Any experience about filing for a cancellation/refund on such a plan?

Any other input or consideration based on your experience will be appreciated.

  
Yes, they will always make the plan sound better than it is.  If you can refund with the warranty place directly, do that.  Otherwise be ready for them to be a PIA trying to convince you why you need to keep it... stand strong and do not give in.
If you have a loan on the vehicle the refund will go straight to your lender.  It will not lower your monthly payment however your loan will be paid off earlier as a result.

When I buy cars now I tell the finance guy I am not interested in any warranties or add-ons and I will not be answering any questions regarding them.  Pretty funny when they try anyway and I just stare at them until they move on.  I had one ask me why I am being so rude when they are just trying to have a conversation, I said any conversation not regarding upsells is fine and asked him what his hobbies were.  He finished up the paperwork and I was on my way without another word.

Edit: I am not saying car warranties are always a bad idea however.  I have a Dodge manufacture warranty on my 2013 Dodge Charger R/T vehicle for 7yrs/60k miles.  I got a great deal via an internet seller and it covers everything (minus consumables) that the factory warranty covered.
 

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In general, extended warranties are a terrible deal for the consumer, there are often huge (up to 50%) commissions to the salespeople and claims service is purposely slow and crappy. There are only extremely rare occasions where third party warranties are mispriced because of a new model year which won't anticipate a significant failure of a major and expensive part of the vehicle.

rated:
I know we're talking about vehicle warranties, but I wanted to chime in with my (and a friend's) experience with regard to tire and wheel "warranties."

My experience: I have bought a T&W warranty on three different vehicles, from three different manufacturers and warranty vendors. The first one was on a 2007 BMW X5 with 18" wheels. That was a bust, and I never used it in my two years of ownership, so I got the prorated refund for it. The second was a 2013 VW GTI, of which I used it extensively. There was a mishap with the finance manager who sold it to me, with regard to the maximum benefit, and he was fired for lying and I was refunded in full but also given a new, unlimited, contract from a different vendor. I used this to replace one wheel and three tires (18" wheels, with low profile tires). Even if I had paid for that warranty, which I was certainly willing to do, I would have came out ahead. My third one is on my 2014 Cadillac CTS with 18" wheels. So far, I've had a wheel replaced, two tires replaced, and one tire plugged. I think I paid about $1200 for this, and have far exceeded the retail cost of the contract. I have just over a year left on the CTS lease, so we'll see if the upcoming NY winter (read: potholes) is nice to the car or not.

Friend's experience: bought a 2009 BMW 335i used with low mileage. Bought the T&W unlimited warranty for around $1300. He had over nine runflat replacements and one wheel replacement. I think he's far exceeded his cost in the value of the warranty.

I have never bought an extended vehicle warranty, nor service plan (aside from T&W) in my life. I have owned eleven vehicles (mix of family hand-me-downs, used (private party and dealership), CPO (dealership), new, low mileage (0/new), mid-mileage (50-100k), high mileage (120k+)) and have never needed a repair so extensive that an extended warranty would have come into play.

ETA: I am, however, considering a Chrysler direct warranty on our new Jeep Grand Cherokee. I got a great deal on it between negotiating cap cost and manufacturer rebates, so I may buy it at the end of the lease. We'll have FAR less than the contract mileage allows, so it may be worth it. I need to make this decision rather quickly, as the tier for buying is from 0-12k miles, and I believe 12 months. We've had it for about two or three months so far. chryslerwarrantiesdirect.com (or something like that) sells genuine Chrysler warranties right from the mothership. A grand or two may be worth a long ass warranty in the end. Not sure.

rated:
Here's my experience with a hondacare extended warranty

1) Your honda won't start having 'major issues' until after 60,000
2) Hondacare is EXCELLENT! No haggles, no issues, no 'we need to inspect it crap', they just fix.
3) All repair places accept Hondacare (including your local repair shops)
4) Don't ever buy Hondacare from the dealer you bought your car from. It's a rip, buy from the places listed above. I got mine from Bernucci (spelling?) but I believe they don't sell them anymore.

rated:
so I got a hondacare from sarducci a couple of years ago, the 84 month/80K $100 deductible plan would have been $565...compared to they $1400 they wanted.

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fwuser12 said:   Vehicle: Honda CRV
Contract length: 84 months/70k miles
Price: $1400.
Plan: Platinum
Deductible: $100

 

  The CRV comes with a 5-year, 60k mile powertrain warranty.  Do you expect to have $1,400 in repair bills between the time the factory warranty expires and when the extended warranty expires?

rated:
Chrysler sells lifetime warranties for roughly $2500-$3000 with a 100 deductible per visit depending on the car. I bought one for my 2006 Chrysler Minivan and it's paid for itself already, and I'm thinking about buying one again for my Chrysler 300. The chrysler lifetime is a nice warranty if you keep your cars for 10+ years.

rated:
cjchaps said:   Chrysler sells lifetime warranties for roughly $2500-$3000 with a 100 deductible per visit depending on the car. I bought one for my 2006 Chrysler Minivan and it's paid for itself already, and I'm thinking about buying one again for my Chrysler 300. The chrysler lifetime is a nice warranty if you keep your cars for 10+ years.
  lifetime no mileage cap?  If so that's not bad

rated:
It's a lifetime powertrain basically. You can upgrade to the almost everything.
And doesn't cover most of their high end or commercial such as viper, Dodge Ram, Sprinter.

rated:
Depends on how long you keep the car and the make/model. Owned an Acura for 7 years and then had a Ford for 5 years. Never had to bring the Acura in for anything other than scheduled maintenance. The Ford, even while it is under warranty, had multiple issues with airbag warning lights, and warning messages that "transmission is not in park" when the thing is in park.

Did not buy Ford extended warranty but did buy Geico Mechanical coverage.

First and last thing buying American-make vehicle.

rated:
jaytrader said:   I know we're talking about vehicle warranties, but I wanted to chime in with my (and a friend's) experience with regard to tire and wheel "warranties."

My experience: I have bought a T&W warranty on three different vehicles, from three different manufacturers and warranty vendors. The first one was on a 2007 BMW X5 with 18" wheels. That was a bust, and I never used it in my two years of ownership, so I got the prorated refund for it. The second was a 2013 VW GTI, of which I used it extensively. There was a mishap with the finance manager who sold it to me, with regard to the maximum benefit, and he was fired for lying and I was refunded in full but also given a new, unlimited, contract from a different vendor. I used this to replace one wheel and three tires (18" wheels, with low profile tires). Even if I had paid for that warranty, which I was certainly willing to do, I would have came out ahead. My third one is on my 2014 Cadillac CTS with 18" wheels. So far, I've had a wheel replaced, two tires replaced, and one tire plugged. I think I paid about $1200 for this, and have far exceeded the retail cost of the contract. I have just over a year left on the CTS lease, so we'll see if the upcoming NY winter (read: potholes) is nice to the car or not.

Friend's experience: bought a 2009 BMW 335i used with low mileage. Bought the T&W unlimited warranty for around $1300. He had over nine runflat replacements and one wheel replacement. I think he's far exceeded his cost in the value of the warranty.

I have never bought an extended vehicle warranty, nor service plan (aside from T&W) in my life. I have owned eleven vehicles (mix of family hand-me-downs, used (private party and dealership), CPO (dealership), new, low mileage (0/new), mid-mileage (50-100k), high mileage (120k+)) and have never needed a repair so extensive that an extended warranty would have come into play.

ETA: I am, however, considering a Chrysler direct warranty on our new Jeep Grand Cherokee. I got a great deal on it between negotiating cap cost and manufacturer rebates, so I may buy it at the end of the lease. We'll have FAR less than the contract mileage allows, so it may be worth it. I need to make this decision rather quickly, as the tier for buying is from 0-12k miles, and I believe 12 months. We've had it for about two or three months so far. chryslerwarrantiesdirect.com (or something like that) sells genuine Chrysler warranties right from the mothership. A grand or two may be worth a long ass warranty in the end. Not sure.

  What the hell do you and your friend do to your wheels?

rated:
vnuts21 said:     What the hell do you and your friend do to your wheels?
  There's a lot of fraud in wheel and tire warranties. 

rated:
Thanks for all the responses so far. To clarify a few things:

Based on my driving, 84 months is going to be the duration of the warranty package (unlikely to put 70k miles before then). The plan is to drive this for a long time (at least 10-15 years or till the wheels come off).

No loan/lien on the vehicle.

I will research a bit about Hondacare and see if that is something I want to buy. One of the reasons to go with Honda is the reliability and hopefully there should not be any need for additional warranty. In any case, the responses so far have convinced me that the package I got is not the one to get.

rated:
fwuser12 said:   One of the reasons to go with Honda is the reliability and hopefully there should not be any need for additional warranty.
 

For the powertrain, maybe, but even that is a big maybe.  It's all the electronics that concern me. 

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fwuser12 said:   Based on my driving, 84 months is going to be the duration of the warranty package (unlikely to put 70k miles before then). The plan is to drive this for a long time (at least 10-15 years or till the wheels come off).
Why would you buy a warranty to cover years 3-7 (6-7 for power train), but not be concerned about years 8-15?

I assume bumper to bumper is 3/36 and power train is 5/60.
  

rated:
Stubtify said:   
vnuts21 said:     What the hell do you and your friend do to your wheels?
  There's a lot of fraud in wheel and tire warranties. 

  I think your implied accusation is cowardly and unwarranted. You can be a keyboard warrior all you want, but don't accuse people of fraud when you haven't a clue of the circumstances. My friend, nor myself, have ever committed fraud. Runflats are only repairable when certain conditions are met. The majority of the time, for a runflat to have an issue to warrant bringing it in for service, it's replaced. Bubbles are commonplace with low profile runflats and some T&W warranties cover bubbles. His did, none of mine have. We live in the Tristate area, where highways are horrible in the winter due to pot holes. The problem is, they rarely repave and just "fix" down here. However, the "fix" happens, then it snows a week later, and the "fix" turns into an even larger pothole because the new asphalt that was the "fix" ripped out more of the old asphalt when the plow truck goes over it.

   

rated:
I wouldn't buy a service contract for a Honda CR-V.  CR-Vs are fairly reliable.  I doubt you have any mechanical issues over the life of the car that aren't wear parts, and often times, those aren't covered under the warranty.  

Keep your $1,400.  If you were buying the Acura version of the CR-V, the RD-X, with more electronics, then I'd say go for it.  Otherwise, keep your $1,400.  The few electronic modules in your CR-V will likely cost a lot less than $1,400 to repair.

I've taken the list of things that this warranty says it'll cover, and "much, much more" and made some comments. See below.  
Nope = less than $1,400
Don't have = You don't have that feature
Not likely to fail = There's a chance, but highly unlikely. 

  • Compact disc player* (NOPE)
  • Radio assemble, speaker system & antenna* (NOPE)
  • Anti-theft system* (NOPE)
  • Navigation system* (NOPE)
  • Rain sensing wiper system (NOPE, HA)


  • Steering wheel & integrated controls (NOPE)
  • Heated windshield (DON'T HAVE)
  • MacPherson struts (WON'T FAIL)
  • Cruise control system (NOPE)
  • Remote keyless entry system* (NOPE)
  • Electronic level control system (DON'T HAVE)


  • Torsion bars, coil springs, & leaf springs (WON'T FAIL)
  • TV,VCR & DVD system* (DON'T HAVE/NOPE)
  • Night vision system (DON'T HAVE)
  • Heated and cooled seat elements (NOPE)
  • Most on-board computers, sensor & relays (NOT LIKELY TO FAIL)
  • And much, much more! (SELLING PITCH)


Keep your money.   EDIT: Even those items covered in the powertrain, gold and gold plus plans, aren't likely to fail as long as the vehicle is maintained according to its maintenance schedule.  For example, I've never seen an AC condenser fail on a Honda before 150k.  On a GM product prior to 2008, sure.  On a Honda, no.

Keep your money. 

rated:
jaytrader said:   
Stubtify said:   
vnuts21 said:     What the hell do you and your friend do to your wheels?
  There's a lot of fraud in wheel and tire warranties. 

  I think your implied accusation is cowardly and unwarranted. You can be a keyboard warrior all you want, but don't accuse people of fraud when you haven't a clue of the circumstances. My friend, nor myself, have ever committed fraud. Runflats are only repairable when certain conditions are met. The majority of the time, for a runflat to have an issue to warrant bringing it in for service, it's replaced. Bubbles are commonplace with low profile runflats and some T&W warranties cover bubbles. His did, none of mine have. We live in the Tristate area, where highways are horrible in the winter due to pot holes. The problem is, they rarely repave and just "fix" down here. However, the "fix" happens, then it snows a week later, and the "fix" turns into an even larger pothole because the new asphalt that was the "fix" ripped out more of the old asphalt when the plow truck goes over it.

   

  
Run flats are one of the reasons, among many others, that I'll likely never buy a new BMW.  Those tires are awful.  They ride hard are prone to those bubbles.  The first thing I'd tell the dealer to do is to replace all of the run flats with my choice of tire.  

I have a friend with an X5 that I recently took for a ride in my XC90 T8 PHEV with air suspension.  The first thing he noticed was how the ride wasn't harsh like his BMW.  Nothing worse than paying $75k for a family SUV that has a rock hard ride. 

rated:
RailroadTrack said:   I wouldn't buy a service contract for a Honda CR-V.  CR-Vs are fairly reliable.  I doubt you have any mechanical issues over the life of the car that aren't wear parts, and often times, those aren't covered under the warranty.  

Keep your $1,400.  If you were buying the Acura version of the CR-V, the RD-X, with more electronics, then I'd say go for it.  Otherwise, keep your $1,400.  The few electronic modules in your CR-V will likely cost a lot less than $1,400 to repair.

I've taken the list of things that this warranty says it'll cover, and "much, much more" and made some comments. See below.  
Nope = less than $1,400
Don't have = You don't have that feature
Not likely to fail = There's a chance, but highly unlikely. 



  • Compact disc player* (NOPE)
  • Radio assemble, speaker system & antenna* (NOPE)
  • Anti-theft system* (NOPE)
  • Navigation system* (NOPE)
  • Rain sensing wiper system (NOPE, HA)


  • Steering wheel & integrated controls (NOPE)
  • Heated windshield (DON'T HAVE)
  • MacPherson struts (WON'T FAIL)
  • Cruise control system (NOPE)
  • Remote keyless entry system* (NOPE)
  • Electronic level control system (DON'T HAVE)


  • Torsion bars, coil springs, & leaf springs (WON'T FAIL)
  • TV,VCR & DVD system* (DON'T HAVE/NOPE)
  • Night vision system (DON'T HAVE)
  • Heated and cooled seat elements (NOPE)
  • Most on-board computers, sensor & relays (NOT LIKELY TO FAIL)
  • And much, much more! (SELLING PITCH)


Keep your money.  

1) OP will not pay $1400 unless he is super rich
2) Navi system is about $1400 if that breaks.

rated:
RailroadTrack said:   
  Nothing worse than paying $75k for a family SUV that has a rock hard ride. 
 

  Well, other than paying $75k for a family vehicle in the first place

rated:
Can anyone recommend a reputable place to buy a Toyota warranty? I didn't even consider it from the dealer, but just purchased a new Sienna and would be interested to see how much one costs elsewhere.

edit:  Well, looks like Toyota bans dealers from selling warranties out of state now, so that narrows the competition considerably.    I guess I'm limited to VA.
 

rated:
Got a 8 year 100k genuine Hondacare for 1200 from:Lynn ArneyFinance Manager4600 Cleveland RoadWooster, Ohio 44691(330) 345-5200, ext. 205Lynn@collegehillshonda.com 
This was the best price I could find from the others that offer the warranties like Scaucci and Geitner

rated:
I have owned two extended warranties in the past. Both of them were on BMW's (It was a company partnered with Costco). Both plans paid off pretty quickly for window regulators, injection problems.

However, I would never buy them for a Japanese vehicle (Honda, Lexus, etc). You are better off just saving some money and paying for repairs as the come.

rated:
maybe prices are up, for a crv the 8 year 100K 100 deductible from sarducci was $835 a year ago.

and as someone already started discussing, i'm more worried about electronics at this point almost than drivetrain

rated:
RailroadTrack said:   
jaytrader said:   
Stubtify said:   
vnuts21 said:     What the hell do you and your friend do to your wheels?
  There's a lot of fraud in wheel and tire warranties. 

  I think your implied accusation is cowardly and unwarranted. You can be a keyboard warrior all you want, but don't accuse people of fraud when you haven't a clue of the circumstances. My friend, nor myself, have ever committed fraud. Runflats are only repairable when certain conditions are met. The majority of the time, for a runflat to have an issue to warrant bringing it in for service, it's replaced. Bubbles are commonplace with low profile runflats and some T&W warranties cover bubbles. His did, none of mine have. We live in the Tristate area, where highways are horrible in the winter due to pot holes. The problem is, they rarely repave and just "fix" down here. However, the "fix" happens, then it snows a week later, and the "fix" turns into an even larger pothole because the new asphalt that was the "fix" ripped out more of the old asphalt when the plow truck goes over it.

   

  
Run flats are one of the reasons, among many others, that I'll likely never buy a new BMW.  Those tires are awful.  They ride hard are prone to those bubbles.  The first thing I'd tell the dealer to do is to replace all of the run flats with my choice of tire.  

I have a friend with an X5 that I recently took for a ride in my XC90 T8 PHEV with air suspension.  The first thing he noticed was how the ride wasn't harsh like his BMW.  Nothing worse than paying $75k for a family SUV that has a rock hard ride. 

  You do realize that BMW isn't the only brand that ships with runflats, right? My CTS has runflats, as an example. Also, unless you compare an X5 with runflats to one without, all else equal, saying your XC90 rides better than the X5 because it doesn't have runflats is akin to these recent political polls--totally irrelevant. 

rated:
Extended warranties are almost always very bad deals from a finance perspective.

Buy insurance on things you can't afford to take the loss on....self insure everything else.

rated:
jaytrader said:   I know we're talking about vehicle warranties, but I wanted to chime in with my (and a friend's) experience with regard to tire and wheel "warranties."

My experience: I have bought a T&W warranty on three different vehicles, from three different manufacturers and warranty vendors. The first one was on a 2007 BMW X5 with 18" wheels. That was a bust, and I never used it in my two years of ownership, so I got the prorated refund for it. The second was a 2013 VW GTI, of which I used it extensively.

  
I'll chime in here and say that I had the same experience. I own a 2012 VW GTI, and the low profile 18 inch oem tires are extremely prone to bubbling. I bought the tire warranty with the car and in the 4 years I've had the car, I've developed sidewall bubbles SIX times! Warranty covered replacing all of them 100%. It's not like I'm even hitting potholes that hard - lots of times they're baby potholes hidden in puddles or in dark areas. One of the huge negatives of this type of car in a cold weather city I guess. I was skeptical of the warranty in the beginning, and I thought I got ripped off for sure, but I ended up making back the cost of the warranty and then some. Definitely worth considering if your car has low profile tires.  

rated:
Part of the problem you guys are having with your tires is being caused by the warranty. You're replacing tires that easily got messed up with the exact same make and model, which is prone to the exact same problem. No wonder it's repeating itself. I've never had the same problems with aftermarket tires from Tire Rack than I've had with OEM tires. Skip the warranty and get a new set (different make and model) when the time comes.

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Are you talking about a maintenance contract where your service costs are paid up front for the car?

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meade18 said:   Part of the problem you guys are having with your tires is being caused by the warranty. You're replacing tires that easily got messed up with the exact same make and model, which is prone to the exact same problem. No wonder it's repeating itself. I've never had the same problems with aftermarket tires from Tire Rack than I've had with OEM tires. Skip the warranty and get a new set (different make and model) when the time comes.
I definitely plan to replace the whole set with high quality non-oem tires once the original tire warranty runs out and I get another sidewall bubble. In retrospect, your suggestion may have come out as the money winner, but depending on the cost of the tire warranty it's not as clear cut as it seems. My warranty was about $800 (unfortunately, idiot me didn't realize there were cheaper versions with lower limits, and the finance people definitely weren't going to mention those to me). A new set of four high performance a/s tires like michelin pilots or conti dws probably runs around $6-700 after installation. So it's close, assuming i don't hit any massive potholes in the aftermarket tires and have to replace them. If you live in a cold weather city with crappy road maintenance like I do, it's a coin flip.

rated:
vipercon said:   When I buy cars now I tell the finance guy I am not interested in any warranties or add-ons and I will not be answering any questions regarding them.  Pretty funny when they try anyway and I just stare at them until they move on.  I had one ask me why I am being so rude when they are just trying to have a conversation, I said any conversation not regarding upsells is fine and asked him what his hobbies were.  He finished up the paperwork and I was on my way without another word.

 


  Hilarious!

rated:
forbin4040 said:   RailroadTrack said:   I wouldn't buy a service contract for a Honda CR-V.  CR-Vs are fairly reliable.  I doubt you have any mechanical issues over the life of the car that aren't wear parts, and often times, those aren't covered under the warranty.  

Keep your $1,400.  If you were buying the Acura version of the CR-V, the RD-X, with more electronics, then I'd say go for it.  Otherwise, keep your $1,400.  The few electronic modules in your CR-V will likely cost a lot less than $1,400 to repair.

I've taken the list of things that this warranty says it'll cover, and "much, much more" and made some comments. See below.  
Nope = less than $1,400
Don't have = You don't have that feature
Not likely to fail = There's a chance, but highly unlikely. 



  • Compact disc player* (NOPE)
  • Radio assemble, speaker system & antenna* (NOPE)
  • Anti-theft system* (NOPE)
  • Navigation system* (NOPE)
  • Rain sensing wiper system (NOPE, HA)


  • Steering wheel & integrated controls (NOPE)
  • Heated windshield (DON'T HAVE)
  • MacPherson struts (WON'T FAIL)
  • Cruise control system (NOPE)
  • Remote keyless entry system* (NOPE)
  • Electronic level control system (DON'T HAVE)


  • Torsion bars, coil springs, & leaf springs (WON'T FAIL)
  • TV,VCR & DVD system* (DON'T HAVE/NOPE)
  • Night vision system (DON'T HAVE)
  • Heated and cooled seat elements (NOPE)
  • Most on-board computers, sensor & relays (NOT LIKELY TO FAIL)
  • And much, much more! (SELLING PITCH)


Keep your money.  

1) OP will not pay $1400 unless he is super rich
2) Navi system is about $1400 if that breaks.


By the time the Navi system breaks, which is highly unlikely given Honda's reliability with electronics, it will not be $1,400 to replace.

When was the last time you heard of someone replacing a Navi system in a Honda? It's not exactly a part prone to failure.

rated:
meade18 said:   Part of the problem you guys are having with your tires is being caused by the warranty. You're replacing tires that easily got messed up with the exact same make and model, which is prone to the exact same problem. No wonder it's repeating itself. I've never had the same problems with aftermarket tires from Tire Rack than I've had with OEM tires. Skip the warranty and get a new set (different make and model) when the time comes.

Exactly. You can buy a nice set of Nitto, Kumho, Michelin or even Conti's a lot less than $1,400.

Skipping 40 Messages...
rated:
OP, warranties are like insurance policies, usually when you buy insurance policies you don't think if you will profit or not. Most cars are reliable these days and it is a way for dealerships to earn money on you.
With insurance policies, if something does happen, you are covered.

A rule of thumb I would say to not buy is
1. avoid any interior/exterior protection plans, all they do is put a solution in both interior and exterior and charge you almost a grand, and deny any liability afterwards. They also contract these jobs out to third party companies. Do it yourself by waxing exterior, cleaning interior, tinting and use a sunshade.
2. avoid any Vehicle service contracts with deductibles, it's only $100 but it adds up. This usually happens if you purchase a used vehicle from a different branded dealership. Alot of the issues are usually under $100.
3. avoid any financial gap insurance if you have equity in the vehicle, I put 30% down on my vehicle, so it didn't make sense.

I myself just purchased a used vehicle a few days ago and went with the following coverages
1. Vehicle service contract, I got a fully loaded vehicle with button shift, it is a first year model where the brand went all out in technology, chances are it will fail, so the VSC is worth it in my opinion.
It is expensive, but a failed NAV or a failed button shift should pay off pretty quickly.
2. Maintenance plan: do your calculation, with a $60 fully synthetic oil change, I paid $75/trip tax free up front that includes oil change, auto detailing (car wash and vacuum interior), 1 key replacement/year, coupons for accessories and possibly future car purchases. Do your math and see what's worth it.
3. My dealership had a paintless dents and ding coverage which covers windshield (I know auto insurance covers it), and exterior ding replacement. my previous car got ding pretty bad by something, no paint chipped out, a fixing that once gets all your money back, covered 7 years to me was worth it.

this may vary by dealership, but all these contracts were tax free, so the maintenance plan jumped out at me. I probably could of got it cheaper elsewhere, but I'd rather pay someone who knows what they're doing.
You will definitely find cheaper alternatives, but sometimes less hassle is worth it.

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