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Do any US card issuers still offer contactless payment cards? I used this feature all the time in the past but when US Bank sent me a replacement card it had a chip but no longer supported the tap-n-pay feature.

The CSR told me that no banks offer contactless payment anymore.

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Costco Citi is contact less but I've only gotten it to work in Subway.

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There is a very long thread over on FT about NFC-enabled cards.

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zipjob said:   Do any US card issuers still offer contactless payment cards? I used this feature all the time in the past but when US Bank sent me a replacement card it had a chip but no longer supported the tap-n-pay feature.

The CSR told me that no banks offer contactless payment anymore.


My HSBC bank credit and debit cards are the only two U.S. bank cards I have that still have contactless payment.

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Contactless payments like paywave and paypass were implemented without much regard for security. Your card information (everything that's on the magnetic strip) can be retrieved at a distance by a cheap electronic device without your knowledge. You may not be liable for unauthorized charges, but you will have to deal with your bank to dispute them.

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The future of contactless payment is through your phone where it can be easily turned on and off so it is not broadcasting all the time and retrievable like scripta described. If you are interested in this, you can get apple pay or android pay and wait for the stores to adopt the correct terminals. Or you can get a Samsung Galaxy S 6/7 and use their contactless payment system which works on most card terminals even if they only have a magnetic strip reader.

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scripta said:   Contactless payments like paywave and paypass were implemented without much regard for security. Your card information (everything that's on the magnetic strip) can be retrieved at a distance by a cheap electronic device without your knowledge. You may not be liable for unauthorized charges, but you will have to deal with your bank to dispute them.
 

  
Absolutely incorrect information.  There are two types of payment contactless in USA: MSD and EMV.  MSD (magnetic stripe data) is compatible with the pre-EMV card networks and equipment.  However, the mandatory chip on the contactless card generates a new cryptographic code for every transaction.  This is much more secure than a magnetic stripe, because it defends against replay attacks.  A magnetic stripe has the same information for every transaction and can be mass copied and distributed with trivial means.  An MSD contactless card has a secure microchip that protects against this.  Furthermore, issuers such as American Express don't even use the card number on the face of the card for contactless transaction.  Even if possible and you "retrieved at a distance" the information on the contactless card, it wouldn't do you any good for fraud transactions or to copy the information onto another card, contactless or not. There is a lot of security implemented in contactless, far far more than magnetic stripes on the back of the card which are the basis for much or most credit card fraud. 

The newer style, EMV contactless is compatible with EMV infrastructure.  It provides even additional security provided by EMV. 

Again, you cannot use contactless cards (MSD or EMV) to copy data usable for a new (fraud or phony) transaction and there have been no sizable real life transactions of this type in the wild.  Just try to conduct simulated fraud (making a purchase without your card using your data that you copied from your own card via a "cheap electronic device."  Such claims have been successful, only at selling super duper protective special wallets to folks who believe them. 

American Express currently offers dual mode EMV cards with both the contact interface (the gold square you insert into a reader) and a contactless interface (the antenna wrapped around the inside of the card. 




 

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My American Express Platinum card has this feature. I was given the choice of receiving a card with our without this capability when I requested the card by phone.

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there are a handful of cards that have it, although merchants that take it in the us are even rarer. It is nice for the London Tube though.

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NFC is extremely common and prevalent in Europe. Their banking system is about a decade ahead of USA with the ease of being able to transfer, features, fees, etc. 

 

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My PNC debit card removed this feature (which I never used) when I got a replacement card earlier this year.

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devyanks90 said:   My PNC debit card removed this feature (which I never used) when I got a replacement card earlier this year.
  
That's because they switched to EMV chips, and didn't want to do dual mode contact/contactless like Amex offers.  Chase did the same thing when they removed their contactless (branded "blink" on top of Paywave or Paypass) offerings.  The dual mode cards cost more than a contact only card. 

American Express is the only major issuer of dual mode EMV contact+contactless cards in USA at the moment.

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My AMEX Cash Preferred is contact-less. It took me about 5 tries to get them to send me one. Even though the CSR's would tell me they were sending the contact-less version every time it still took 5 tries before one actually showed up.

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