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via WSJ, figure represents about 39% of 1995-2017 loans --

The federal government is on track to forgive at least $108 billion in student debt in coming years, as more and more borrowers seek help in paying down their loans, leading to lower revenues for the nation’s program to finance higher education.

The Government Accountability Office disclosed the sum Wednesday in a report to Congress which for the first time projected the full costs of programs that set borrowers’ monthly payments as a share of their earnings and eventually forgive portions of their debt.

The GAO report also sharply criticized the government’s accounting methods for its $1.26 trillion student-loan portfolio, pointing to flaws that have led it to alter projected revenues significantly over the years. The government says it still expects the program to generate a profit over the long term, but it has repeatedly trimmed expectations for revenues.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-forgive-at-least-108-billion-...

More press:  https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-11-30/the-feds-have...
http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/2016/11/30/us/politics/ap-us-stu...

Actual GAO report:  http://www.gao.gov/assets/690/681064.pdf

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Endowments do fund schools in part.   But large endowments are not common.   And the amount of money endowments generate... (more)

jerosen (Dec. 07, 2016 @ 3:21p) |

Yeah, but those permanent funds/endowments were set up to sponsor a MUCH smaller school in most cases.  UT Texas (for ex... (more)

RedWolfe01 (Dec. 07, 2016 @ 4:07p) |

^redwolf, yeah the increased # of students is part of the problem. Students have never paid the full cost of their ed... (more)

jerosen (Dec. 07, 2016 @ 5:16p) |

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tuphat said:   via WSJ --

The federal government is on track to forgive at least $108 billion in student debt in coming years, as more and more borrowers seek help in paying down their loans, leading to lower revenues for the nation’s program to finance higher education.

The Government Accountability Office disclosed the sum Wednesday in a report to Congress which for the first time projected the full costs of programs that set borrowers’ monthly payments as a share of their earnings and eventually forgive portions of their debt.

The GAO report also sharply criticized the government’s accounting methods for its $1.26 trillion student-loan portfolio, pointing to flaws that have led it to alter projected revenues significantly over the years. The government says it still expects the program to generate a profit over the long term, but it has repeatedly trimmed expectations for revenues.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-forgive-at-least-108-billion-...

  I hate feeding leechers, beggars, vultures, lazy people
Yes I hate it.

Because I work for my money and I paid all my tuition out of my pocket.

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tuphat said:   via WSJ --

The federal government is on track to forgive at least $108 billion in student debt in coming years, as more and more borrowers seek help in paying down their loans, leading to lower revenues for the nation’s program to finance higher education.

The Government Accountability Office disclosed the sum Wednesday in a report to Congress which for the first time projected the full costs of programs that set borrowers’ monthly payments as a share of their earnings and eventually forgive portions of their debt.

The GAO report also sharply criticized the government’s accounting methods for its $1.26 trillion student-loan portfolio, pointing to flaws that have led it to alter projected revenues significantly over the years. The government says it still expects the program to generate a profit over the long term, but it has repeatedly trimmed expectations for revenues.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-forgive-at-least-108-billion-...

  Seriously....so our taxes are going towards paying off bills for deadbeats and people that chose to take out 100k loans to study art history....

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These types of bailout programs are an admission that much of the money being spent in secondary education is a bad investment. A large portion of $1 trillion dollars in student loans will never be repaid. I am going to estimate 40%-50%.

The only thing student loans has achieved is making college tuition prices explode into the stratosphere. Previous generations could work a part time job, live in a modest dorm, and pay their tuition bill. Now the schools all compete to provide luxury dormitories, gourmet meals, rock climbing walls, Olympic sized pools and the tuition can hit 50k per year with the invoice going directly to the US taxpayer.

 

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The real problem is with for-profit schools, which have dramatically higher default rates than non-profit colleges and community colleges.

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delete

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sharpie130 said:   
tuphat said:   via WSJ --

The federal government is on track to forgive at least $108 billion in student debt in coming years, as more and more borrowers seek help in paying down their loans, leading to lower revenues for the nation’s program to finance higher education.

The Government Accountability Office disclosed the sum Wednesday in a report to Congress which for the first time projected the full costs of programs that set borrowers’ monthly payments as a share of their earnings and eventually forgive portions of their debt.

The GAO report also sharply criticized the government’s accounting methods for its $1.26 trillion student-loan portfolio, pointing to flaws that have led it to alter projected revenues significantly over the years. The government says it still expects the program to generate a profit over the long term, but it has repeatedly trimmed expectations for revenues.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-forgive-at-least-108-billion-...

  Seriously....so our taxes are going towards paying off bills for deadbeats and people that chose to take out 100k loans to study art history....

  
Actually it isn't the art history or even the normal colleges.  Its the "for profit" schools that the government has shut down and then announced they would forgive the notes for those schools.  Which means the students lost potentially YEARS of time in a school that is actually worthless since they can't finish.  Then they have to find a school that will take their transfer credits.

I HAVE an AA degree from one of those schools back before it was blighted.  My degree is still acceptable MOST places but I can't ever get a Bach degree without starting over.  My school was $35K or so for 2 years back in the 90s, I paid it off in 8 years or so. 

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brettdoyle said:   These types of bailout programs are an admission that much of the money being spent in secondary education is a bad investment. A large portion of $1 trillion dollars in student loans will never be repaid. I am going to estimate 40%-50%.

The only thing student loans has achieved is making college tuition prices explode into the stratosphere. Previous generations could work a part time job, live in a modest dorm, and pay their tuition bill. Now the schools all compete to provide luxury dormitories, gourmet meals, rock climbing walls, Olympic sized pools and the tuition can hit 50k per year with the invoice going directly to the US taxpayer.

 

  It's a wealth transfer from taxpayers and indentured servitude of students to ideologues that infest colleges. 

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Just think of it as welfare with positive externalities. Youre keeping people employed at educational institutions that would otherwise not have jobs, and keeping unemployables off welfare for 4 years while theyre in college.

The government spends 2 trillion dollars A YEAR on social security and medicare.

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cestmoi123 said:   The real problem is with for-profit schools, which have dramatically higher default rates than non-profit colleges and community colleges.
  
Oh I don't know about that... my undergrad alma mater (a top 50 non-profit school) and my grad school (an Ivy League university) both charge ridiculous sums of money, at great increases from where they were 10-15 years ago.  I took out minimal debt and paid it back almost instantly thanks to working in the tech industry.  My wife took out tens of thousands to attend an in-state university and a different, out-of-state grad school.

DeVry and ITT Tech are certainly a bunch of weasels preying on people watching Judge Judy and Jerry Springer... but the "non-profit" university system in this country is drunk on student loan debt.

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fleetwoodmac said:   
Because I work for my money and I paid all my tuition out of my pocket.
 

  That must have been before you learned of FW finance forum.

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sullim4 said:   
cestmoi123 said:   The real problem is with for-profit schools, which have dramatically higher default rates than non-profit colleges and community colleges.
  
Oh I don't know about that... my undergrad alma mater (a top 50 non-profit school) and my grad school (an Ivy League university) both charge ridiculous sums of money, at great increases from where they were 10-15 years ago.  I took out minimal debt and paid it back almost instantly thanks to working in the tech industry.  My wife took out tens of thousands to attend an in-state university and a different, out-of-state grad school.

DeVry and ITT Tech are certainly a bunch of weasels preying on people watching Judge Judy and Jerry Springer... but the "non-profit" university system in this country is drunk on student loan debt.

  
ITT was where I went, back when I attended you got a decent education.  As the REAL bottom feeders started buying up the better schools and converting them to the wreck they are now that changed.

Of course they had to pretend to follow accreditation guidelines but you were fairly safe from being expelled for things like attendance.  I worked until just before class started so I was routinely 10-15 minutes late which under attendance guidelines means I was "absent" for that first hour almost every day.  (even though I was just a bit late and the teacher was okay with it since he knew why)  So I spent most of time there under "attendance probation" but they were never going to boot me because they would not get paid further if they did.  The education was okay, if somewhat easy for you as long as you had the right kind of tech mind.  If you had the wrong type of mind then you could indeed fail -- some people can't follow a logic flow and some can.  Some folks can't help but blow up a few ICs or caps every lab... they weed themselves out fairly fast.    

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sharpie130 said:   Seriously....so our taxes are going towards paying off bills for deadbeats and people that chose to take out 100k loans to study art history....
Uhm, couple things:
1) Actually federal student loans have limits, so one couldn't borrow more than $23K subsidized and a total of $57500 subsidized+unsubsidized for undergraduate study. I suppose one could go to grad school to study art history and borrow another $20K/yr for 4 years, but I don't think this happens enough to have a discussion about it.
2) If you read the OP, not even the articles, you'd realize that "our taxes" aren't paying for any of it, as the program pays for itself and will STILL GENERATE A PROFIT even after forgiveness.

I'm not defending deadbeats, just showing that your outrage is misguided.

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scripta said:   
sharpie130 said:   Seriously....so our taxes are going towards paying off bills for deadbeats and people that chose to take out 100k loans to study art history....
Uhm, couple things:
1) Actually federal student loans have limits, so one couldn't borrow more than $23K subsidized and a total of $57500 subsidized+unsubsidized for undergraduate study. I suppose one could go to grad school to study art history and borrow another $20K/yr for 4 years, but I don't think this happens enough to have a discussion about it.
2) If you read the OP, not even the articles, you'd realize that "our taxes" aren't paying for any of it, as the program pays for itself and will STILL GENERATE A PROFIT even after forgiveness.

I'm not defending deadbeats, just showing that your outrage is misguided.

  Virtually no one has receive foregiveness yet, so that will change.

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>> Just think of it as welfare with positive externalities. Youre keeping people employed at educational institutions that would otherwise not have jobs, and keeping unemployables off welfare for 4 years while theyre in college.

People who are passionate about a topic - don't need any of this to keep educational institutions going.

I know many, many bright people who could easily have chosen a corporate career making 6 figures and above relatively easily (i.e. with near certainty) who are now working the post-doctoral grind hoping to become a tenure track faculty somewhere someday. They chose to take a path that is financially non-rewarding, simply because they are passionate.

I think you would want these guys leading the basic sciences education.

For professional education - you should hire professionals in the field who would like to teach. Again - you will find plenty of them.

Teaching is matter of passion. Assuming there is opportunity - some people would love to do it for no money, while some would not do it for any amount of money.

This whole situation where admin stuff takes 60%+ of a university's personnel cost is messed up! A barebones college staffed exclusively by people passionate about the field and paid according to their field's economic potential is what is really required.

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jd2010 said:   Just think of it as welfare with positive externalities. Youre keeping people employed at educational institutions that would otherwise not have jobs, and keeping unemployables off welfare for 4 years while theyre in college.

The government spends 2 trillion dollars A YEAR on social security and medicare.

  

and that has what to do with the topic?


SS and Medicare are still taking in more than they are paying out, btw.

https://www.ssa.gov/oact/trsum/


 

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Can we get a refund?

Free healthcare, free food, free housing, free smart phones, and now free college. What's next, free cars?

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I wonder how much of this would be curbed by simply extending the "free education costs" in to Community Colleges/2 year degrees? I'm not a fan of California, but the state offering "free" CC is one thing I think they are doing correct.  Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

University is different from HS, which is also different from CC.  I tried a year at an in-state U and totally bombed (like <2.0 GPA bombed).  Went the CC path, then U after that and did much, much better.  Final GPA after U was over 3.7, even with the bombed first year.

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PhDeez said:     Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

Not disputing your entire post, but any "mandate" would just become the new norm at every CC. 100% of students would pass/get a 3.0/etc to scoop that govt cheddar

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jd2010 said:   
PhDeez said:     Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

Not disputing your entire post, but any "mandate" would just become the new norm at every CC. 100% of students would pass/get a 3.0/etc to scoop that govt cheddar

  
Not really, the CCs don't have any fiduciary reason to "support" the universities.  CC tuitions are generally so low that as long as the "free" ones have a control mechanism it won't be a big expense. 

Plus the students still have to work (or live at home) anyway -- THAT isn't subsidized.  If they are already on welfare or whatever then CC may get them OFF.  It still requires effort from the student.

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RedWolfe01 said:   
jd2010 said:   
PhDeez said:     Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

Not disputing your entire post, but any "mandate" would just become the new norm at every CC. 100% of students would pass/get a 3.0/etc to scoop that govt cheddar

  
Not really, the CCs don't have any fiduciary reason to "support" the universities.  CC tuitions are generally so low that as long as the "free" ones have a control mechanism it won't be a big expense. 

Plus the students still have to work (or live at home) anyway -- THAT isn't subsidized.  If they are already on welfare or whatever then CC may get them OFF.  It still requires effort from the student.

  
You miss my point.  If the government sets the metrics for students getting reimbursed, every community college in the country will magically start grade inflating to ensure that everyone who pays them tuition gets whatever grades the cutoff is set at.  No one will attend any community college except for those who basically guarantee that it will be free through rampant grade inflation.

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does this include public service forgiveness etc?

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brettdoyle said:   
The only thing student loans has achieved is making college tuition prices explode into the stratosphere.
 

  True.  This is another example of a bad result of a program that was originally sold as a path to help those who couldn't afford the higher costs of education.  The student loan money enriched those in the bureaucracy by ratcheting up the cost of tuition and the students and taxpayers are ultimately left paying for this folly

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Just wanted to point out the sneaky Community College cost increase going on while everyone is complacent about it.

4-5 years ago, the local CC (the good one - which has good vocational courses) used to run ~400/course for credit courses and half that for non-credit ones. I or wifey would often enroll in some course (e.g. "touch typing course") that we found interesting and withdraw if we found the course was not helpful (e.g. instructor no good, class way too disruptive etc). There were no financial penalties for doing that as long as you withdrew within the first couple of classes.

Fast forward to the current semester (i.e. fall 2016 semester). Two credit courses now cost ~$1450 to enroll (wifey wanted to get into some basic "PL/SQL" and "C#" classes). Turned out the classes were not really helpful (which is surprising - usually our local CC has people with a lot of industry experience come and teach - with surprisingly helpful programming courses for a CC).

Cancelling after first two classes only got me back $670 !@##@##... i.e. we lost out ~$800 for no good reason!!

Cost increase + making financial policies unhelpful -> there sure seems to be cost inflation afoot in the CC's.

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Not knocking degrees, and I think higher education is a very good idea for certain professional careers, but college is overrated as shit. We're in a credential bubble, which will burst, and everyone's degrees will hold far less value to employers...

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jd2010 said:   RedWolfe01 said:   
jd2010 said:   
PhDeez said:     Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

Not disputing your entire post, but any "mandate" would just become the new norm at every CC. 100% of students would pass/get a 3.0/etc to scoop that govt cheddar

  
Not really, the CCs don't have any fiduciary reason to "support" the universities.  CC tuitions are generally so low that as long as the "free" ones have a control mechanism it won't be a big expense. 

Plus the students still have to work (or live at home) anyway -- THAT isn't subsidized.  If they are already on welfare or whatever then CC may get them OFF.  It still requires effort from the student.

  
You miss my point.  If the government sets the metrics for students getting reimbursed, every community college in the country will magically start grade inflating to ensure that everyone who pays them tuition gets whatever grades the cutoff is set at.  No one will attend any community college except for those who basically guarantee that it will be free through rampant grade inflation.


The grades are already inflated. I took anatomy and physiology at CC. The tests were 20 questions multiple choice. People who got 5 or 6 wrong still got As.

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jaytrader said:   Not knocking degrees, and I think higher education is a very good idea for certain professional careers, but college is overrated as shit. We're in a credential bubble, which will burst, and everyone's degrees will hold far less value to employers...
  I am seeing a completely different story where if one doesn't have a college degree, career prospects are very poor.  
Our technology, manufacturing, maintenance, transportation, etc,  has gotten quite complex and no longer can be satisfied by a simple task based skills.  If the job is repetitive enough, a robot can do it.  Jobs that require critical thinking, specific knowledge and improvisation are the future.  So, the way I see it, a 4 year college degree now is what a high school degree used to be 5 decades ago.  It's becoming a standard for any decent paying job.  And if you really think about, it completely makes sense.  Over the past 200-300 years the qualifications for a good paying job has gradually increased from ability to read, write, then do math, followed by science and now technology.  

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Rubl said:   
jaytrader said:   Not knocking degrees, and I think higher education is a very good idea for certain professional careers, but college is overrated as shit. We're in a credential bubble, which will burst, and everyone's degrees will hold far less value to employers...
  I am seeing a completely different story where if one doesn't have a college degree, career prospects are very poor.  
Our technology, manufacturing, maintenance, transportation, etc,  has gotten quite complex and no longer can be satisfied by a simple task based skills.  If the job is repetitive enough, a robot can do it.  Jobs that require critical thinking, specific knowledge and improvisation are the future.  So, the way I see it, a 4 year college degree now is what a high school degree used to be 5 decades ago.  It's becoming a standard for any decent paying job.  And if you really think about, it completely makes sense.  Over the past 200-300 years the qualifications for a good paying job has gradually increased from ability to read, write, then do math, followed by science and now technology.  

  
*Anecdotal evidence incoming* Some of the most successful people I know, don't have a degree. A lot of very unsuccessful people I know, have a degree. 

It is definitely a pro before it is a con. It shows discipline, and the obvious additional education. All in all, it is overrated in most cases though. Take management for example. A huge field that makes for very viable careers. College cannot teach you people skills, critical thinking, and leadership. They can try, but we all know some people have it, and some don't. What manager didn't get a job because they didn't have a degree? What manager got the job because of skills they learned in college? Most managers got their position by working their way up, developing skills on their own, and proving their performance. Unfortunately, these days kids think they just get the piece of paper, then they will be the GM of a factory.

I strongly disagree with the whole "more college educated people makes for a better society" notion. In the generation of my parents, and grandparents, a lot less went to college than today. Not only do I think society managed just fine back then, people weren't adding crippling student debt. More college students doesn't mean more high-paying jobs will suddenly be created. College is not for everyone. Some people won't ever need it. Some people are better off with a trade. It's become such a big business that the powers that be spread these ideas to younger minds, who really don't know what's going on. I don't care what we spend on Medicare, Defense, etc, it does not justify why we need to add $80,000 for someone's liberal arts degree.

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College has also become a substitute for employer training programs that were common a few decades ago. 

Also, the bubble has somewhat been fueled by parents desires and expectations. Sure, they might believe that vocational training is a great substitute for college- but for the neighbors kid and not their little special snowflake.

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Rubl said:   
jaytrader said:   Not knocking degrees, and I think higher education is a very good idea for certain professional careers, but college is overrated as shit. We're in a credential bubble, which will burst, and everyone's degrees will hold far less value to employers...
  I am seeing a completely different story where if one doesn't have a college degree, career prospects are very poor.  
Our technology, manufacturing, maintenance, transportation, etc,  has gotten quite complex and no longer can be satisfied by a simple task based skills.  If the job is repetitive enough, a robot can do it.  Jobs that require critical thinking, specific knowledge and improvisation are the future.  So, the way I see it, a 4 year college degree now is what a high school degree used to be 5 decades ago.  It's becoming a standard for any decent paying job.  And if you really think about, it completely makes sense.  Over the past 200-300 years the qualifications for a good paying job has gradually increased from ability to read, write, then do math, followed by science and now technology.  

  
Basic tech jobs used to require an AA degree and a lot still do -- but now we are often competing with MASTERS degrees from poor countries.  (sometimes H1Bs but often already green carded)  

Some employers always WILL overvalue credentials, like a company I know about that requires a bachelor minimum to work for the company in ANY role.  Including secretarial and admin.
 

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TravelerMSY said:   College has also become a substitute for employer training programs that were common a few decades ago. 

Also, the bubble has somewhat been fueled by parents desires and expectations. Sure, they might believe that vocational training is a great substitute for college- but for the neighbors kid and not their little special snowflake.


Yup. I love when people say "we still need trashmen." Of course they aren't volunteering their kids for the job.

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matrix5k said:   
The grades are already inflated. I took anatomy and physiology at CC. The tests were 20 questions multiple choice. People who got 5 or 6 wrong still got As.
 

  
While missing 5 or 6 and still getting As is a sign of grade inflation I would not automatically assume multiple choice, or even true/false means a problem.  Both of my parents used to teach at the community college level, I did a lot of the grading in my teen years.  All questions were either true/false or multiple choice and open book/open note.  If you knew the material they were trivially easy (as in taking little more time than it took to read the questions--one time when I did know the material I tried one, 5 minutes, aced it), if you didn't you would bomb the tests (The key was the questions would require you to put two facts together.  Know both, it was obvious.  Forget a detail, you very well might be able to find it in your book.  Don't understand a concept, might as well guess, you had no hope of looking it up.)  Both of them tossed out the results of the first quiz because of this--students would come in thinking it would be a cakewalk and get a very rude surprise on the first test.  The ultimate failure I saw was the basketball star that manged to get a 25% on a true/false final.  (No guessing penalty, either--she simply didn't answer many questions, although she did manage to do well under chance on the ones she did answer.)

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matrix5k said:   
jd2010 said:   
RedWolfe01 said:   
jd2010 said:   
PhDeez said:     Maybe if we did this on a Federal level we could make passing CC a requirement to get loans backed by and subsidized by the government?

Not disputing your entire post, but any "mandate" would just become the new norm at every CC. 100% of students would pass/get a 3.0/etc to scoop that govt cheddar

  
Not really, the CCs don't have any fiduciary reason to "support" the universities.  CC tuitions are generally so low that as long as the "free" ones have a control mechanism it won't be a big expense. 

Plus the students still have to work (or live at home) anyway -- THAT isn't subsidized.  If they are already on welfare or whatever then CC may get them OFF.  It still requires effort from the student.

  
You miss my point.  If the government sets the metrics for students getting reimbursed, every community college in the country will magically start grade inflating to ensure that everyone who pays them tuition gets whatever grades the cutoff is set at.  No one will attend any community college except for those who basically guarantee that it will be free through rampant grade inflation.


The grades are already inflated. I took anatomy and physiology at CC. The tests were 20 questions multiple choice. People who got 5 or 6 wrong still got As.

  That is not grade inflation that is the bell curve system

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brettdoyle said:   and the tuition can hit 50k per year
 

  
50?  Sadly you are very much underestimating current prices.

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Treefarn said:   brettdoyle said:   and the tuition can hit 50k per year
 

  
50?  Sadly you are very much underestimating current prices.


Only at private universities. Maybe the government should stop giving any loans for over priced private schools.

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scripta said:   
If you read the OP, not even the articles, you'd realize that "our taxes" aren't paying for any of it, as the program pays for itself and will STILL GENERATE A PROFIT even after forgiveness.  



Not exactly. Read the GAO report: there are serious issues and questions as to how DOE is projecting revenue vs. cost, such that "profitability" estimates are little more than guesses. The actual results will not be known for many years.

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user1337 said:   
brettdoyle said:   These types of bailout programs are an admission that much of the money being spent in secondary education is a bad investment. A large portion of $1 trillion dollars in student loans will never be repaid. I am going to estimate 40%-50%.

The only thing student loans has achieved is making college tuition prices explode into the stratosphere. Previous generations could work a part time job, live in a modest dorm, and pay their tuition bill. Now the schools all compete to provide luxury dormitories, gourmet meals, rock climbing walls, Olympic sized pools and the tuition can hit 50k per year with the invoice going directly to the US taxpayer.

 

  It's a wealth transfer from taxpayers and indentured servitude of students to ideologues that infest colleges. 

  It is welfare to profit based colleges and institutions that lend.  But as usual, just ignore them.. just as they want you to.  College up 400% in cost, and worth less than it did 30 years ago.  Blame the people trying to get a degree!  Brilliant!

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Use to be a time when one could just include the college debt in a bankruptcy. imagine if they opened that back up, floodgates to the courts.  I left with a Bachelors degree and 30K paid off in under 10 years at 1.75%. paid for as much as I could while taking those classes.  people at work in medical have $150+ in loan debt, one I know has $250K. can't imagine that on my shoulders.

 

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Dec 1, 2015 article:  "California’s Higher-Education Crisis -- Scores of highly qualified students are failing to secure spots at the Golden State’s public universities"  http://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2015/12/californias-higher-education-crisis/418293/ 

Public University Tuition Example  - UCLA,  Los Angeles, California

2016-2017 ESTIMATED UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT BUDGET
The tuition, fees, and charges shown below are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by State funding reductions.Per Academic Year (9 months)
   UCLA
Residence Halls
Off Campus
Apartments
 Living with
Relatives
Tuition and Fees  $12,918 $12,918 $12,918
Room and Board $15,069 $10,653 $4,854
Books and Supplies $1,635 $1,635 $1,635
Transportation $600 $1,122 $1,686
Personal $1,677 $1,869 $2,067
Health Insurance =10.2438px[3 ] $2,148 $2,148 $2,148
Total – California Residents $34,047 $30,345 $25,308
Nonresident Supplemental Tuition $26,682 $26,682 $26,682
Total – Nonresidents $60,729 $57,027 $51,990
 

 UCLA Law: Tuition and Fees
The 2016-17 J.D. tuition rates are provided below.

  • California Resident: $45,338.28
  • Non-Resident: $51,832.28
  • Health insurance: $3,642.09*

The amounts above represent fees as currently approved. However, all University fees are subject to change, and the fee amounts billed for this period may be adjusted at a future date. Please be aware that fees are subject to revision without notice.In addition to tuition and fees, law school students should budget approximately $800.00 per semester for books and supplies.*The health insurance is a mandatory fee but it may be waived provided you have comparable health insurance. For details, visit the Arthur Ashe Student Health & Wellness Center

Skipping 35 Messages...
rated:
^redwolf, yeah the increased # of students is part of the problem. Students have never paid the full cost of their education via tuition. And now theres a lot more students that are subsidized. Plus you have the new capital costs to expand the size of the schools.


Sweet Briar seems unique. Its an all womens private school founded on the site of an old plantation site in 1901. Apparently their ~3000 acres is the 4th largest campus in the nation. That also is not at all typical. Its a failing school. They list 250 students but thats post failure. I don't know how many they had in their peak. I read they had over 600 a few years ago. Some of the obscure private schools are having a hard time competing. They're too expensive and not prestigious enough to get a lot of students, they have little endowment and no outside funding sources. Who wants to pay $50k to go to a mediocre an all girl college in rural VA? Apparently not enough people.

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