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Has anyone ever kept a car after a accident that insurance company considereda total loss?

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I have a car that had a rearend accident . I want to  keep the car.  It is a Honda Accord  hybrid. My insurance company wants to consider it a a total loss and change it to salvage title.  I want to fix  rear bumper, trunk and cracked front bumper.  Can I repair it myself.? Has anyone ever done it before.  What are my options? This in San Francisco, California

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rated:
zaqotron said:   I have a car that had a rearend accident . I want to  keep the car.  It is a Honda Accord  hybrid. My insurance company wants to consider it a a total loss and change it to salvage title.  I want to fix  rear bumper, trunk and cracked front bumper.  Can I repair it myself.? Has anyone ever done it before.  What are my options? This in San Francisco, California
  Have you asked them not to declare it a total loss and to pay for the repair?

I had a car in the shop for an accident and the insurance guy said he was considering declaring it a total loss but the Body Shop manager (with my blessing) convinced him I wanted it repaired because I could not get an equivalent vehicle for the money they would have paid for the loss.

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I have. My 2003 Camry was hit while parked in the street. Progressive declared it a total loss and paid me the max amount that I could get with the insurance I had. I think it was 1500 or 2500, I forget. But I kept the car and got it fixed for under $1000. My Camry was already salvaged from previous accident so I didn't have to do any DMV paperwork.

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whatth3 said:   I have. My 2003 Camry was hit while parked in the street. Progressive declared it a total loss and paid me the max amount that I could get with the insurance I had. I think it was 1500 or 2500, I forget. But I kept the car and got it fixed for under $1000. My Camry was already salvaged from previous accident so I didn't have to do any DMV paperwork.
  Did you keep the same insurance?

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zaqotron said:   Has anyone ever done it before.  
  No, nobody ever in history.
whatth3 said:   I have. My 2003 Camry was hit while parked in the street. Progressive declared it a total loss and paid me the max amount that I could get with the insurance I had. I think it was 1500 or 2500, I forget. But I kept the car and got it fixed for under $1000. My Camry was already salvaged from previous accident so I didn't have to do any DMV paperwork.
  
Correction, one person has.

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Are you going to keep the car forever, drive it until the wheels fall off?
Or do you plan on trading it in or selling it a year from now?

If you plan on keeping it forever, then you may have a good deal on your hands.
But if you plan on selling it / trading it in soon, it may be a hassle with a tainted title.
Also, it will be worth less than you think, given the salvage title.

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I had a 1993 Ford Festiva Hatchback that was hit hard on the back right side. It jammed up the back part from about the back seat at the rear wheel/differential and hatchback was severely damaged. The opposing car driver insurance declared it totaled and paid me off. I had a Body Shop that has done top notch work for me before. They took it and found a used rear differential to replace the damaged one and worked their magic for the rest. It cost me about $500.00 more than the car accident settlement from the other insurance company. Terms of the settlement was a salvage title change which I did not do until I actually sold the car some years later. My insurance company accepted that I had it repaired and continued to insure it. Saved my financial ass. Gave me time (a few years) to save up for the next car. It became a work horse when I delivered lost luggage for the airlines.

I believe California may have an annual car inspection requirement which I did not have to dean with living in the USA Midwest. IF I am correct, you may want to consider that.
Photo
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ford_Festiva#/media/File:1990_Ford...

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zaqotron said:   My insurance company wants to consider it a a total loss and change it to salvage title.  
  Years ago you could keep the title and get a payoff from the insurance. Now because of consumer protection laws, most states require the insurance co. to make sure the title becomes salvage even if you keep the car.

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atikovi said:   
zaqotron said:   My insurance company wants to consider it a a total loss and change it to salvage title.  
  Years ago you could keep the title and get a payoff from the insurance. Now because of consumer protection laws, most states require the insurance co. to make sure the title becomes salvage even if you keep the car.

  You can still register and tag a salvage in most states.  Just need to prove it is safe for road use first.
 

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JW10 said:   It cost me about $500.00 more than the car accident settlement from the other insurance company. 
  Wait a minute, so you paid $500 to have your car repaired? Wouldn't it have been better to go find another car that hadn't had major repair?

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zaqotron said:   I have a car that had a rearend accident . I want to  keep the car.  It is a Honda Accord  hybrid. My insurance company wants to consider it a a total loss and change it to salvage title.  I want to fix  rear bumper, trunk and cracked front bumper.  Can I repair it myself.? Has anyone ever done it before.  What are my options? This in San Francisco, California
  
a photo would be nice, and how much insurance wants for the car

by "repair it myself" do you mean literally repairing it yourself or hire out, my wife's Hyundai was rear ended in front of our house, totally busted rear hatch rear body panel and squashed bumper, $10k estimate,  insurance totaled it deducted $2500 from the settlement, i bought $1200 parts to repair myself, so add up the repair bill (parts + labor if you have someone do it)  and how much you pay insurance to keep the car to see if it's worth fixing considering now it's salvaged, sometimes it's simple part replacement no major damage and it's worth fixing, once it's repaired next step is get a brake and light inspection cert, when you go to DMV someone may come out and check your car,  then you apply for a salvage title, the whole process is pretty straightforward,  i am across the bay from you so process should be the same, 

if you are repairing yourself to save money the light inspection and DMV are not looking for  perfect workmanship,  if you hire out definitely shop around, don't go for mobile guys on CL, but plenty of shops you pay half price than official estimate and get 90% quality

if you are claiming from at fault party's insurance don't forget to ask for loss of use in lieu of rental car,  it should start counting from date of accident to they cut you the check,  can be a few hundred dollars there

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I don't know about where you live but I know a few people that have done it in MI and OH. They let the insurance company "scrap" it and bought it from them. Then they fixed it.

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My damage cost $12000 for the rear bumper, trunk,slightly bent quarter panel (where the rear lights are) and  the front bumper is slightly cracked.  Where did you get the parts from?

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zaqotron said:   My damage cost $12000 for the rear bumper, trunk,slightly bent quarter panel (where the rear lights are) and  the front bumper is slightly cracked.  Where did you get the parts from?
  Junk yards, craiglist, auctions. Sometimes you can find the whole car cheaply with mechanical issues for a decent price.  I've got parts off eBay as well.

EDIT:  A dented quarter panel might be fixable with a pulling tool.  Some use a suction cup to pop the dent out.  Other times the whole piece may need to come off and be pounded into shape.  The bent trunk might be as well.  Hard to say without pictures.  The real question is the frame.  That is harder to fix.  Some shops have frame pullers/straighteners.  That was done to one of my cars.

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Besides eBay, try CarParts.com for used parts salvaged by resellers. Some of these salvage reseller may be able to get you a part from junk car if you pay them shipping+part's price.

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techrover said:   Besides eBay, try CarParts.com for used parts salvaged by resellers. Some of these salvage reseller may be able to get you a part from junk car if you pay them shipping+part's price.
  eBay can also offer the option of picking up parts locally.  They have a local search.

The local newspaper used to be one of my go to places.

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My understanding (not an insurance person, just having gone through this on my car last year) is that to determine the car is a total loss, the insurance company looks at the estimate of the repairs vs their value of your vehicle. If it's above a certain threshold (say, 85% of the car's value), it's a total loss. Where you can have some play is in the estimated amount of damage. If you'd like to keep your car from having the salvage title that will come with a total loss declaration, sit down with the folks at the Body Shop you took it to (or take it to another one for a second opinion) and say "look, they're trying to total this and I don't want that. Can we go over this really closely to try and keep it under their threshold?" It's in the Body Shop's best interest to help you out, as if it's totaled, they're expecting that will mean many thousand dollars in repair business out the window.

In my case, the manager and a couple of her best guys came out and gave it a bunch of looks and were able to say "yeah, we can straighten X instead of replace it, and I'll put everything I can in as salvage-sourced which will cut the price way down", etc.

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 What happened to me in NYS.
 Got rear ended at stop light. insurance said cars worth 2200 ... costs 3800 to fix it. cars is totaled. We are sending u check for 1875$ ... cars worth 2200$ with 8% for inconvenience or something like that. We have joes junkyard scheduled to come pick it up in 3 weeks and they will give you another 400$ cash. If you want to keep the car just cancel the junk guy.
 It was that easy once i finally got them on the phone.
 The dmv was notified that the car was totaled im sure, but none the less, i drove it for another year and then junked it.

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You have the option to sue for the difference in value. At least where I live. I filed a mini tort for $500. I never needed to see a judge and the process was done via email/fax. The check was sent via mail. Cost me nothing to do.

Always take pictures at the scene. That saved me some time and hassle later. The other party(the other persons insurance) didn't even send anyone to verify the damage because I had the pictures taken at the scene which I sent with email.

rated:
Here's a fun story:

2/1989 - I Bought a 1986 Chevy Z-24 for $5400
2/1991 - Totaled it, received $4400 from insurance company (didn't have option to keep it) and bought another car for $2000
7/1991 - Totaled replacement car, received $2000 fro9m insurance company
7/1991 - While looking for a replacement car I noticed a Z-24 at a used car dealership. Stopped to look at it realized it was my Z-24 that I totaled in 2/1991, all fixed up. Bought it again for $2500
2/1997 - Totaled Z-24 again received $2000 from insurance

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Your insurance premiums must be "fun" too?

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I was not at fault in any of them.

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Still goes in your history file so even if not your fault, can influence your rates.

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I've bought one back and stripped it down and parted it out which worked out very well. I had other cars of the same make and model,so it was nice having a parts car around. the current vehicle I have, was bought from a salvage lot and I repaired the damage. I wouldn't have done this normally but it was a hard to find model with the color combination. It's been two years and still have yet to see one on the road or forsale.

Anyway, this kinda thing is not for everyone, but I love working on cars when I had the time. Never had a car payment, and up until this last car, I always sold my vehicles for more then I had put into them.

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I waited 23 months to settle... drove it for 23 months then let them have it.

Edit: most states you have 2 years to settle.

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zaqotron said:   My damage cost $12000 for the rear bumper, trunk,slightly bent quarter panel (where the rear lights are) and  the front bumper is slightly cracked.  Where did you get the parts from?
  
i found mine at http://www.car-part.com/ ...it searches all the wrecking yards ....also LKQ is another good site....if its $12K from official estimate probably includes cutting and replacing certain sections, i wouldn't worry about cracked front bumper can be plastic welded, if you are doing yourself probably can straighten it out with a porta power or a come along, but i would just bring it to a low cost shop to fix it for $4k to 5k it will look semi-decent, i know a guy has a shop $7k official estimate he could fix for $2k to 3k, of course he's not cutting anything just straigten out the panel replace parts and paint
 

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Spooie said:   Here's a fun story:

2/1989 - I Bought a 1986 Chevy Z-24 for $5400
2/1991 - Totaled it, received $4400 from insurance company (didn't have option to keep it) and bought another car for $2000
7/1991 - Totaled replacement car, received $2000 fro9m insurance company
7/1991 - While looking for a replacement car I noticed a Z-24 at a used car dealership. Stopped to look at it realized it was my Z-24 that I totaled in 2/1991, all fixed up. Bought it again for $2500
2/1997 - Totaled Z-24 again received $2000 from insurance

  Jesus, drive more carefully, it might save your life.

rated:
bought a white 2003 saturn   car was white in color
in 2007 had major hail damage,
insurance check was 6000, after a 500 deductible.
had to ask them not to total it, they gave me the option 

siliconed the headlight and tail light.
replaced the windshield
renamed the car the titelist.

switched insurance companies

6 months later car totaled, not my fault.
6000 for the car, they deducted 500 due to slight hail damage.

rated:
dbphillips said:   
JW10 said:   It cost me about $500.00 more than the car accident settlement from the other insurance company. 
  Wait a minute, so you paid $500 to have your car repaired? Wouldn't it have been better to go find another car that hadn't had major repair?

  I paid $500.00 more than I was paid by the other insurance company.  They did not make any more like my car.  As repaired, it was fully functional.  Nothing in my price range was attractive to me.  The engine and front interior was undamaged.  I found a similar car with low relative mileage for $3000.00 in a farmer's barn and bought it.  I just had an emotional bond with the damaged car.  It actually worked out well when I was delivering lost luggage for the airlines. The repaired car became my work car and the farmer car became my personal car preserving the lower mileage.

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Got sideswiped in 2009, other driver was at-fault.  My insurance company at the time considered my car a total loss as they estimated around $7K of damage on a car with a book value of around $9K (the car was almost 10 years old). They were prepared to cut me a check for around $8K (as I had a $1000 deductible) and advised that I'd get reimbursed a portion of the deductible based upon the percentage they collected (via a subrogation claim) from the at-fault driver's insurance co.  When I told them that I really didn't want to get rid of the car, they offered me the option to keep it but that they'd have to deduct its scrap value (maybe $1500 at the time) and that it would then require being issued a salvage title.

It didn't seem to me that the damage truly warranted totaling the car, and the notion of a salvage title didn't sit right w/ me.  My insurance co's adjustor suggested that the at-fault driver's insurance co (Geico) may come up with a lower estimate (since his estimate was based on NEW parts whereas Geico may be allowed to go w/ USED parts, and they may have negotiated lower rates for labor). I followed his suggestion and it worked out.  Geico came up with an estimate that was just under their threshold for totaling the car (perhaps $5.5k), leaving enough room for them to also cover the cost of a car rental car while my car was in the shop (which ended up being 10 or so days).

Assuming that I could have fixed the car on my own for $5.5K, accepting my insurance company's offer would have probably been the better move financially (even if I had rented a car on my own); however, the Geico process was like using a concierge service. They had their inspection office setup at a nearby reputable Body Shop, inclusive of a car rental agency.  Was able to bring my car to them, have them inspect the damage, agree to repair it, and pickup my rental car from there. Thus, the entire process was very convenient.  By having the vehicle repaired this way, was able to cancel the claim w/ my insurance co and thus avoid the salvage title. 

Had I accepted my insurance co's payout and managed the repair and subsequent car rental myself, I'd have collected around $6.5K (i.e. $8K - $1.5K scrap value).  Then I'd have had to get the car repaired on my own (I guess $5.5K or less, although if Geico has negotiated labor rates that are lower than what the average Joe can get, who knows) and rent a car on my own (perhaps another $400 - $500).  Stood to profit $500 to $600 (i.e. $6.5K payout - $5.5K repair - [$400 to $500] car rental) but then end up w/ a salvage title. The hassle factor of managing it myself in conjunction w/ a salvage title wasn't worth it for me at the time.

Had I later gotten reimbursed a portion of the $1,000 deductible, then perhaps it would have been more worthwhile.  Given that I let Geico inspect my car, where they came up w/ a repair estimate that was 5/9 of what my insurance company estimated, the Geico estimate is likely all my insurance co would have collected from their subrogation claim, so at best I'd have gotten reimbursed 5/9 of the $1000 deductible, which is ~$555.

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Have done this a few times for cars totaled in Ohio.  One I had repaired and others I did myself.  Last one was hail damage - easy one.  Told insurance company I wanted to keep/buy-back the car and they deducted the salvage value from the insurance payout.  As others have stated, you get a salvage title from the insurance company.  You need to repair it to be road-worthy in your state.  For me in this case it was to repair broken mirrors and a cracked windshield.  Then took the car in for an ODOT inspection (where they seemed to spent most of the time checking numbers on parts, looking for stolen parts). If it doesn't pass you will need to fix it and bring it back.  When it passed, ODOT provided me with paperwork to apply for a rebuilt title.  Cannot recall the salvage and rebuilt title costs or inspection fees, but they weren't a lot.  In most cases I did this because I did not want to be rushed into looking for a replacement vehicle.

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My dad's truck was hit by a car and they wanted to total it. It's a bit older but had very low miles and was in good condition. He looked around, even test drove a few, and didn't think he could get something comparable to his truck for the money, so he fought with the insurance to have it fixed instead. (My dad is quite Handy and able to work on cars but this wasn't something you could fix in your own garage)
 

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Let us clarify something. Procedures YMMV by the state you live in. In Nebraska, I signed an agreement as part of the insurance settlement to get a salvage title from the county car registration department which handle car titles for the state but in the county courthouse.
My point is AFIK, you do not get the actual salvage title from the insurance company, but from a state or local government agency or department.

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I went to the car-parts website. I need almost  the whole rearend, . Can I order the whole rearend bumper, trunk, lights, maybe quarter panel? What does rear assembly mean? Do they deliver? I went to LKQ website and found  a rear assembly.Does that include the trunk? Do they deliver? Thanks for all the help.

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CA uses TLF (total loss formula) to determine if the car is totaled.
If you don't want them to salvage the car there are three things you need to work on.
1 - The actual cash value of the car prior to the accident. Make sure the adjuster doesn't skimp. If you recently had work done that increased the value, make sure they know it. And use it.
2 - The final salvage value needs to be high. The condition of the car prior to the accident may not help here because the salvage dealers are not selling parts based on that.
3 - The total repair costs need to be low enough to keep the TLF in your favor, but not so low that you don't have any room for unseen repair needs. In your favor for this instance doesn't mean leaving money on the table that can be used for needed repairs.  
Knowing the values used for the first two before proceeding with the third will help you determine how low, if any, you need to get the repair estimate down.
The high salvage value could work against you if the car is still totaled after all, and you elect to buy it back.
 
What my adjuster did was to get a salvage estimate from three auto salvage dealers and used the average of those figures as the final salvage value of the vehicle. 
The cost of repair is likely determined by the adjuster. If you can get a repair shop to look at the wreck and give you a solid repair cost, and agree to accept that amount to restore the vehicle, you may get the adjuster to use that figure when calculating the TLF. This will also be the amount the insurance company will pay out, less your deductible, so you don't want to go too cheap. Just cheap enough to make the TLF work for you.

Going back to a legal vehicle from salvage can be costly. If you want to keep the vehicle, the insurance company will require you to get a salvage certificate from the state. This is usually free. Then they will pay you the difference in the actual cash value, less the salvage cost, less any deductible. They will give you a buy back letter that will have to be used later in the reconstruction process.
The "buy back" is the amount you will pay sales tax on when you apply for a reconstructed title. You will also pay tax on the value of any parts and labor (even your own labor) used to restore the car. There will also be other fees for the DMV inspection, the normal inspection, emissions inspection, title fees, registration fees, notary fees, etc etc etc.

Calculate what you think the end result will be. It may even mean more out of pocket costs on your part. It may be better for you to settle for a lesser amount from the insurance company and them not total the car, than it would be to get the larger payout and have to go through the entire reconstruction process. And consider the end value of the car after repair with a reconstructed title vs a clean title. How To: Reregister a Salvage (Total Loss) Vehicle (HTVR 13) 

rated:
 The car is worth about $16,000 before accident. That is what insurance told me and Salvage value is about $4000. I have to double check my figures. I am going to be getting  repair estimates soon. What would happen if I did some of the repairs my self like fixing  cracked bumper before we settle? .Would that lower the repair cost so the car would not be a total loss?

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Your other option, if the car is really expensive to fix , is to part it out (sell the parts on eBay and craigslist).

But don't piss off your neighbors with a junk car in the driveway, keep it in the garage while you part it out.

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The insurance just sent me a check.    I did not even sign anything yet.or agree to keep the car yet. or to  let them have the  car. They sent me DMV papers to transfer title to them and a form that states that the car  is a total loss. Why would they give me a check before I sign or agree to anything?

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zaqotron said:   The insurance just sent me a check.    I did not even sign anything yet.or agree to keep the car yet. or to  let them have the  car. They sent me DMV papers to transfer title to them and a form that states that the car  is a total loss. Why would they give me a check before I sign or agree to anything?
  
LAck of communication.  They had a claim, they worked it.

I had a motorcycle that was totalled (it doesn't take much to total one due to relative cost and cost of work) but still rideable.  I asked the insurance company and they removed one of the parts from the damage estimate, bringing the bike just under their max and they cut me a check.  No title change, I rode it for another year or two and offered it to a guy in my apartment complex for $1000 or so (undamaged it was worth $6K max)  THAT guy totalled it again and forced the other insurance to repair it for about $7000 -- more than it was worth but he planned to buy it from me for $1000 and end up with a "new" pristine bike.  If only he had actually paid me before playing games, a few weeks later they had to call me for a check signature.  I did feel for the guy taking the hit, if he had had them pay off the bike I would have split it and still come out ahead of the $1000 I was asking.

Since you can't split a working motorcycle I told him to get lost for playing games.  I wouldn't have known about it except they needed my signature, I am kinda surprised they let him put it in for repair, really.  So I ended up with a bike I didn't need that was back in new shape. 

Skipping 25 Messages...
rated:
jimates said:   CA uses TLF (total loss formula) to determine if the car is totaled.
If you don't want them to salvage the car there are three things you need to work on.
1 - The actual cash value of the car prior to the accident. Make sure the adjuster doesn't skimp. If you recently had work done that increased the value, make sure they know it. And use it.
2 - The final salvage value needs to be high. The condition of the car prior to the accident may not help here because the salvage dealers are not selling parts based on that.
3 - The total repair costs need to be low enough to keep the TLF in your favor, but not so low that you don't have any room for unseen repair needs. In your favor for this instance doesn't mean leaving money on the table that can be used for needed repairs.  
Knowing the values used for the first two before proceeding with the third will help you determine how low, if any, you need to get the repair estimate down.
The high salvage value could work against you if the car is still totaled after all, and you elect to buy it back.
 
What my adjuster did was to get a salvage estimate from three auto salvage dealers and used the average of those figures as the final salvage value of the vehicle. 
The cost of repair is likely determined by the adjuster. If you can get a repair shop to look at the wreck and give you a solid repair cost, and agree to accept that amount to restore the vehicle, you may get the adjuster to use that figure when calculating the TLF. This will also be the amount the insurance company will pay out, less your deductible, so you don't want to go too cheap. Just cheap enough to make the TLF work for you.

Going back to a legal vehicle from salvage can be costly. If you want to keep the vehicle, the insurance company will require you to get a salvage certificate from the state. This is usually free. Then they will pay you the difference in the actual cash value, less the salvage cost, less any deductible. They will give you a buy back letter that will have to be used later in the reconstruction process.
The "buy back" is the amount you will pay sales tax on when you apply for a reconstructed title. You will also pay tax on the value of any parts and labor (even your own labor) used to restore the car. There will also be other fees for the DMV inspection, the normal inspection, emissions inspection, title fees, registration fees, notary fees, etc etc etc.

Calculate what you think the end result will be. It may even mean more out of pocket costs on your part. It may be better for you to settle for a lesser amount from the insurance company and them not total the car, than it would be to get the larger payout and have to go through the entire reconstruction process. And consider the end value of the car after repair with a reconstructed title vs a clean title. How To: Reregister a Salvage (Total Loss) Vehicle (HTVR 13) 


Former claims adjuster here (total loss specialist for Progressive, actually)...

No amount of work from the OP trying to get a "solid" repair estimate that the Body Shop will "stick to" will help in this situation, really. Especially since in a large amount of total losses the damage isn't visible until tear down. No insurance company wants to get 10k into repairs where the break even point is 11k (example only) and then find out there are hidden/unexpected additions to the original estimate. Therefore they just don't do it. They will overestimate by a certain percentage just to total the car so that a 10k barely repairable estimate doesn't turn into a 20k firestorm.

You say that the final salvage value should be high...actually, it needs to be low to keep a car from totaling. The break even point is the cost of repairs and the salvage cost...if the value of the car is higher, no total...if it's less, total. If the OP wants to total the car and keep the vehicle, that's when it's in his best interest to have the low salvage cost, as that's what would be deducted from the vehicle valuation (and deductible, other applicable fees) and produce the largest settlement amount.

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