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rated:
I've noticed (specifically on Capital One because it appears that it takes longer for transactions to post than my other credit cards) that transactions will post quicker when the statement is about to cut. Many transactions take 2-3 days to move from pending to posted (even when the merchant codes as a purchase as opposed to initial authorization). However, transactions with those same merchants will post to the statement if made the day before the statement cuts.

Is there any relationship here, or is this just coincidence?

I'm not complaining, and this is purely educational because the transactions are things like coffee shops, etc... where I'm only charging a couple dollars - not really worried about any float.

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rated:
Is your statement date close to month end?
Stores process transactions faster at month end.

rated:
I've noticed the opposite. For example, Discover often backdates the "post" date to the transaction date so they are the same. Near the statement, they can't do this since they can't rewind to before the statement is printed, so the post date is later than the transaction date.

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The card issuer has no incentive to make the transaction posting process more complicated by making it faster or slower depending on when your statement cuts, so if they are doing this I can't fathom why.

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I HAVE noticed this, but I can't recall which card (between Chase, Discover, and CapOne). I saw that while usually transactions don't post for 2 days, a transaction made the day before the statement closed ended up on the statement.

Lost my $0.99-$2 credit a few times that way

rated:
marginoferror said:   I've noticed (specifically on Capital One because it appears that it takes longer for transactions to post than my other credit cards) that transactions will post quicker when the statement is about to cut. Many transactions take 2-3 days to move from pending to posted (even when the merchant codes as a purchase as opposed to initial authorization). However, transactions with those same merchants will post to the statement if made the day before the statement cuts.

Is there any relationship here, or is this just coincidence?

I'm not complaining, and this is purely educational because the transactions are things like coffee shops, etc... where I'm only charging a couple dollars - not really worried about any float.

  Posting times are dictated by when the merchant presents the final charge.  Most are either one-day or two-day.  And variance is most likely due to technical glitches.

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doveroftke said:   The card issuer has no incentive to make the transaction posting process more complicated by making it faster or slower depending on when your statement cuts, so if they are doing this I can't fathom why.
They don't have a large incentive to make it slower. Faster at end would eliminate a month of float and make the payment due a month earlier. This would also make any recurrent penalties/fees higher by 1 month.

(I am not saying they do this, but if it were my company and legal i would definitely do both of these along with other shenanigans like slowing posting of travel purchase in December if the account hadn't yet used their 300 travel credit for the year.)

They also have a small incentive to post things slower beginning/mid cycle because a dumb customer might only be looking at balance without including pending charges and decide to make more purchases than they otherwise would have resulting in a higher likelihood of not being able to pay in full, resulting in ongoing interest charges.

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doveroftke said:   The card issuer has no incentive to make the transaction posting process more complicated by making it faster or slower depending on when your statement cuts, so if they are doing this I can't fathom why.Sure they do -- if a transaction is made just before the statement cuts, they are giving you a free loan for up to ~55 days. But if they "accelerate" it, then that loan is only free for ~25 days (grace period)

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Glitch99 said:   
marginoferror said:   I've noticed (specifically on Capital One because it appears that it takes longer for transactions to post than my other credit cards) that transactions will post quicker when the statement is about to cut. Many transactions take 2-3 days to move from pending to posted (even when the merchant codes as a purchase as opposed to initial authorization). However, transactions with those same merchants will post to the statement if made the day before the statement cuts.

Is there any relationship here, or is this just coincidence?

I'm not complaining, and this is purely educational because the transactions are things like coffee shops, etc... where I'm only charging a couple dollars - not really worried about any float.

  Posting times are dictated by when the merchant presents the final charge.  Most are either one-day or two-day.  And variance is most likely due to technical glitches.

  I would've generally figured that. One of the merchant's is a coffee shop and I know they have to batch at the end of the day or the system won't let them close out that day. Technical glitches I suppose are possible; but the "glitch" would presumably be on the ones taking longer which are most of the transactions.

svap- no it's around the 10th of each month.

NEDeals - thanks, I'm talking more about the day the transaction actually posts as opposed to the "posting date" the cc issuer lists. As in, the day you log in online and see it included in current balance.

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scripta said:   
doveroftke said:   The card issuer has no incentive to make the transaction posting process more complicated by making it faster or slower depending on when your statement cuts, so if they are doing this I can't fathom why.
Sure they do -- if a transaction is made just before the statement cuts, they are giving you a free loan for up to ~55 days. But if they "accelerate" it, then that loan is only free for ~25 days (grace period)

  
Sure, but it would be a lot simpler to just make all transactions post as soon as possible. Having to monkey with posting times depending on how close the statement date is just asking for trouble (technical, billing, and regulatory).

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doveroftke said:   scripta said:   doveroftke said:   The card issuer has no incentive to make the transaction posting process more complicated by making it faster or slower depending on when your statement cuts, so if they are doing this I can't fathom why.Sure they do -- if a transaction is made just before the statement cuts, they are giving you a free loan for up to ~55 days. But if they "accelerate" it, then that loan is only free for ~25 days (grace period)Sure, but it would be a lot simpler to just make all transactions post as soon as possible. Having to monkey with posting times depending on how close the statement date is just asking for trouble (technical, billing, and regulatory).Sure, unless there is financial incentive for the issuer to NOT post the transactions as soon as possible.  It's borrowed money to them (the credit card issuer pays interest to someone on the money it lends to card users), right? But if it hasn't posted it hasn't been borrowed for sure yet, so maybe it costs the bank less or nothing at all until it posts. I'm just guessing here.

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