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I searched and didn't find anything.

I'm looking for good books that will share useful tax strategies.  I just learned that I could have been making Trad IRA contributions up to $5,500 for my non working spouse and it's tax deductible.  I'm tired of my Accountant never suggesting this stuff and just picking it up piecemeal as I go.  

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I think you are referring to spousal IRA contributions, not 401k ?

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This is why it is good to do your own taxes. You learn a lot of this stuff, just by going through the process. Even when using TurboTax or other software, I know it shows you what your IRA limits are when it asks you how much each has contributed.

another hint for OP: look into the saver's tax credit.

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There are many; here's one. Updated annually.  How to Pay Zero Taxes, 2017: Your Guide to Every Tax Break the IRS Allows 

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When I first read the title I thought it was a new idea about changing book to tax to book on tax.

OP- there are probably articles online that describe the most often overlooked tax deductions. You could also just go down the list of items on the return and figure out which one is to see if you can qualify to reduce your tax. Obviously, this isn't going to encompass everything, but it's a pretty good start for some basic information.

How much do you pay your accountant? If you're hiring them to prepare your taxes, that's what they're going to do. Tax planning is separate, usually not included in tax filing, and generally much more expensive.

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TecJunkie said:   I just learned that I could have been making Trad 401k contributions up to $5,500 for my non working spouse and it's tax deductible.
 

  
It's not too late to make that contribution for 2016, btw. You have until the tax filing deadline, April 18th, 2017.

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TecJunkie said:   I'm tired of my Accountant

Is he really an accountant? My dad had a tax man. He was nothing but high paid data entry clerk. My dad missed out on lots of tax savings.

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marginoferror said:   
How much do you pay your accountant? If you're hiring them to prepare your taxes, that's what they're going to do. Tax planning is separate, usually not included in tax filing, and generally much more expensive.

Is he really an accountant? My dad had a tax man. He was nothing but high paid data entry clerk. My dad missed out on lots of tax savings.
 
Thats why you hire, and pay for, a tax attorney

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fw9999 said:   There are many; here's one. Updated annually.  How to Pay Zero Taxes, 2017: Your Guide to Every Tax Break the IRS Allows
Here's another one, also updated annually.  Surprisingly, in my experience, very few people have actually ever read it!

IRS Publication 17 - Your Federal Income Tax

I always recommend to everyone that you do your taxes, just once, the old fashioned way.  Print the forms and sit down with your pencils and calculator and fill them out by hand.  You will have a great sense of how your taxes are determined and what you can do to impact the amount you pay.  

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kb2120 said:   I think you are referring to spousal IRA contributions, not 401k ?
  Yep, good catch.  Corrected.

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rufflesinc said:   Thats why you hire, and pay for, a tax attorney

Some people don't know the difference. Where I live, I'm pretty sure a significant portion of the uneducated and ignorant think that H&R Block and the like ARE tax attorneys.
  

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I would generally advise against using a tax attorney for tax prep.

A lot of people don't need much more than a data entry person that asks the right questions and maybe provides a bit of advice. For those people, a tax attorney is probably overkill.

For the people who have complicated taxes, are engaging in tax planning techniques, and doing things of that nature, a tax attorney wouldn't generally be the best option - I would opt for a skilled preparer (CPA designation is helpful, but doesn't indicate someone is involved in taxes at all, let alone a return preparer). If you're truly doing complex planning, you should probably have a tax attorney (or multiple) involved, but in terms of individual's return preparation, they generally aren't the best qualified and come with a higher price tag.

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Lots of good info at Bogleheads, Mad Fientist, Mr Money Mustache.

Make sure you are maxing out your pre-tax space: 401k, trad ira's, HSA, etc.

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gremln007 said:   Make sure you are maxing out your pre-tax space: 401k, trad ira's, HSA, etc.
And commuter benefit, if applicable. That's one that I particularly take advantage of.

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Chyvan said:   
TecJunkie said:   I'm tired of my Accountant

Is he really an accountant? My dad had a tax man. He was nothing but high paid data entry clerk. My dad missed out on lots of tax savings.

  
He really is.  He's good at filing my taxes and keeping me within the letter of the law, but I'm not getting a lot of savings suggestions or strategy advice.

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BrianGa said:   
gremln007 said:   Make sure you are maxing out your pre-tax space: 401k, trad ira's, HSA, etc.
And commuter benefit, if applicable. That's one that I particularly take advantage of.

  
Can i file this even if I am already reimbursed by my employer?

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