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Landlord dispute with removal of satillite dish

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Long story short, I'm moving from my apartment and had Directv. Directv said they won't remove the old satillite Dish because it becomes a permainint fixture on the apartment and it is now the landlords property. Landlord wants the Dish removed and said they'll charge me for the removal. Directv says they're not responsible for the Dish anymore and neither am I. What should I do?

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Presumably you agreed to what DirecTV says somewhere in the fine print of your contract.

As to whether your landlord can charge you for it's removal, that may be up to what the landlord agreed to when you asked for permission.

I would just remove it and fix the holes. If you had it installed on the roof, I would expect a big repair bill.

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Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish?

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BostonOne said:   Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish
  Not legally required. 

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Does the lease address the matter? Most leases address modification of the landlord's property and require the tenant to restore the property to the same or better condition reasonable wear and tear excepted.

Regardless of whether there is a legal requirement to seek approval to install a Dish, one can reasonably assume that costs of removing the Dish and restoring any attachment damages are those of the tenant and can be deducted from the security deposit or charged to the tenant.

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Seems that one way or another you're responsible for removing it.  

DirectTV isn't removing it. 
Your landlord wants it removed and thats within their right.  

You can pay the landlord the charge for removing it.
You can remove it yourself.    
You can pay someone else to remove it.

You might want to ask your landlord how much they'd charge to remove it and then go from there.   If its a reasonable charge to remove it maybe its not a big deal.   If they quote you some outlandish figure then you can call local satellite companies for a quote or just get a handyman to do it or do it yourself.  
It gets more tricky if the installation was amateurish in the first place and theres gaping holes in the roof when the Dish is removed.   Landlord is likely to require that to be fixed too.   A couple screw holes in the side of the house may not be much of an issue.

 

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rufflesinc said:   Presumably you agreed to what DirecTV says somewhere in the fine print of your contract.

As to whether your landlord can charge you for it's removal, that may be up to what the landlord agreed to when you asked for permission.

I would just remove it and fix the holes. If you had it installed on the roof, I would expect a big repair bill.

  I get the feeling the problem is that he doesnt want to remove it himself, and cant get either DirectTV or the landlord to do it for him.

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bigdinkel said:   Long story short, I'm moving from my apartment and had Directv. Directv said they won't remove the old satillite Dish because it becomes a permainint fixture on the apartment and it is now the landlords property. Landlord wants the Dish removed and said they'll charge me for the removal. Directv says they're not responsible for the Dish anymore and neither am I. What should I do?
  
What do you think you should do?  The landlord is entitled to his property back in the same condition it was delivered to you.  No satellite Dish, no holes for mounting, etc.  Either get it removed/fixed or pay the landlord to do it.

 

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alamo11 said:   
BostonOne said:   Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish
  Not legally required. 

The landlord can place reasonable restrictions on Dish installation. Were there restrictions in place and did the OP follow them? If the Dish was installed in a common area, OP would have had to get permission.

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Real Estate law in many states is anything attached to a building becomes part of the building. The tenant was duty bound to get permission to attach it in the first place. OP does not indicate if that was done.

It appears both parties want it removed. They need to agree how it should be done. Most Dish installers are independent contractors and can remove a Dish. Most have some experience with removal related repair.

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Just borrow a ladder and climb up there and remove it. Bring a set of socket wrenches and some caulk for the holes. Or hire a handyman to do it.

It is unusual to remove them though. They usually stay up for the next person to use or ignore.

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There was a Dish on the roof when I bought my home. Had no plans to use myself. I wound up removing everything but the base bracket (~6" x 6") and just put silicon sealant all around the based edges/holes. Should be fine until I replace the roof and not visually noticeable since its so small.

A decade or so ago when I rented an apartment I got permission to install DirecTV from the landlord. I distinctly remember the agreement with the landloard stating that I'd remove the Dish and repair any damage or be responsible for a $75 fee for them to do so. I paid the $75 at move out.

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You may wish to inform the landlord that future tenants can install these pursuant to the FCC rules and perhaps he might just wish to leave it there assuming it was installed properly...
https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/installing-consumer-owned-a...
 

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TravelerMSY said:   Just borrow a ladder and climb up there and remove it. Bring a set of socket wrenches and some caulk for the holes. Or hire a handyman to do it.

It is unusual to remove them though. They usually stay up for the next person to use or ignore.

  I just had to remove a Dish myself after I cut the cord.  You can remove the Dish but leave the plate the Dish is mounted to, that way you won't leave holes in the roof.  It's not hard, just a socket wrench, and if just the plate is left behind it won't be noticeable.  

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jman220 said:   
 d if just the plate is left behind it won't be noticeable.  

  Noticable or not, if it's in the roof, you won't know if there's a leak until too late. A competent landlord would remove everything and repair the roof fully

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Ask the landlord how much he will want to have him remove the Dish. If it is reasonable pay the money and be glad he is doing it. Any leaks or problems are now his problem. I can understand a landlord would not want a roof full of dishes.

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I had Dish - called Dish agencies in vicinities(found them up on dishtv.com) . One of them agreed to come for 50$. when he came he sed he will take the satelite and attached booster etc. I was like no way Dish will charge me. He called Dish in front of me and told them the antenna is on the roof and customer cannot remove - so they said, customer can just send back the dvr and remote. Which I did. Apparently with the satelite booster you can connect many homes etc using 1 account and split costs. So in short - called directtv agencies in vicinity and try your luck.

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Never ever thought it was a good idea to install a Dish on my roof. Good way to fark up your roof. I always use a pole mount myself.

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I left the Dish on my place. The next owner might want it.

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alamo11 said:   
BostonOne said:   Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish
  Not legally required. 

  Yes and no..... If for example it was mounted it to the roof then mounting it caused damage.  Upon removal there will be holes that could leak.  That cost $$$$$ to fix.  Furthermore if the landlord wants it gone it's really the tenants job to remove it or have it removed.  They had it put there.  It's not the landlords responsibility to climb up there and remove it. It's generally accepted but not explicitly spelled out that any "permanent mounts" to the building or parts of the building require permission.   If it was mounted in a way that does not do any unreasonable damage then no permission is required and there are very few restrictions.  Even if antennas weren't specifically covered in the lease damage to the building is likely covered in more general terms.
FCC said: What kinds of restrictions are permitted?

Restrictions necessary to prevent damage to leased property are permissible, as long as the restrictions are reasonable. For example, a lease restriction that forbids tenants from damaging the balcony floor when installing an antenna is likely to be permissible.



https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/installing-consumer-owned-antennas-and-satellite-dishes 

 

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Get a ladder and DIY. Problem solved at $0 cost!

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If it is on the roof, I have charged approx $100-$200 (I dont recall), as that is how much it cost for a roofing company to come out and fix the holes and replace shingles in the spot.

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kingdoodler88 said:   Never ever thought it was a good idea to install a Dish on my roof. Good way to fark up your roof. I always use a pole mount myself.
  back in the day when I requested DirectTV, I specifically asked for them to mount it to a pole.
They refused because the "signal wasn't strong enough".
installing a Dish yourself isn't always an option, you have to know where to point it, otherwise you just installed a lawn ornament.
 

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LOOPHOLE said:   You may wish to inform the landlord that future tenants can install these pursuant to the FCC rules and perhaps he might just wish to leave it there assuming it was installed properly...
https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/installing-consumer-owned-antennas-and-satellite-dishes

  
Tenants have a right to install a Dish, but they do not have a right to damage property.  If a clear signal can be obtained without mounting on the roof, then the landlord can restrict that - the FCC cannot require holes be drilled in a roof.  

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JaxFL said:   If it is on the roof, I have charged approx $100-$200 (I dont recall), as that is how much it cost for a roofing company to come out and fix the holes and replace shingles in the spot.
  Not just the shingles, but the lag bolts meant replacing the boards underneath

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Did the sat company require you to get your landlord's authorization before installation? Did you mention in your app for service the property was leased?

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BostonOne said:   
alamo11 said:   
BostonOne said:   Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish
  Not legally required. 

The landlord can place reasonable restrictions on Dish installation. Were there restrictions in place and did the OP follow them? If the Dish was installed in a common area, OP would have had to get permission.

  Incorrect:

http://transition.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Cable/Orders/1998/fcc98273.pdf

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EvilCapitalist said:   
BostonOne said:   
alamo11 said:   
BostonOne said:   Did you get the landlord's permission prior to installing the Dish
  Not legally required. 

The landlord can place reasonable restrictions on Dish installation. Were there restrictions in place and did the OP follow them? If the Dish was installed in a common area, OP would have had to get permission.

  Incorrect:

http://transition.fcc.gov/Bureaus/Cable/Orders/1998/fcc98273.pdf

  
You should really quote relevant sections rather than just linking to a 99 page long legal document.

Did you mean this? : 

 "This Second Report and Order does not amend the rules to cover common property and restricted access property, as defined below, because we conclude Section 207 does not authorize us to do so"

or this ?: 
"A restriction barring damage to the structure of the leasehold (e.g., the balcony to an apartment or the roof of a rented house) is likely to be a reasonable restriction on installation under 47 C.F.R. § 1.4000(a).81 Thus, for example, tenants could be prohibited from drilling holes through the exterior walls of their apartments.82 In addition, tenants could be prohibited from piercing the roof of a rented house in any manner given the risk of serious damage.8"


 

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The key is "areas of exclusive control."  A roof is not an area of exclusive control in a lease situation.  You can install a Dish on your balcony, but a landlord can prohibit you from doing any damage to the building.  For the most part, you'd have to mount the Dish to a pole in a bucket of concrete.

https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/installing-consumer-owned-a...

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Landlord is correct. You will be charged.

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What would be the right thing to do? You install a Dish, and landlord wants it removed. Dish company refusing to do it. Rather than going through all the troubles .. why not just ask the landlord. Look Dish wont come - what do you suggest? And see if you can get an agreement from landlord - something in writing, for $50 or $100 (something reasonable) - landlord will take care of the matter & issue is closed.

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bigdinkel said:   Landlord wants the Dish removed and said they'll charge me for the removal. 

Who wants to stare at an ugly Dish every time they walk up to the place? Did you also leave an inop beater in the parking lot with 4 flat tires and a busted windshield?

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imbatman said:   
kingdoodler88 said:   Never ever thought it was a good idea to install a Dish on my roof. Good way to fark up your roof. I always use a pole mount myself.
  back in the day when I requested DirectTV, I specifically asked for them to mount it to a pole.
They refused because the "signal wasn't strong enough".
installing a Dish yourself isn't always an option, you have to know where to point it, otherwise you just installed a lawn ornament.

  Installing a Dish yourself is pretty simple as long as you have a clear line of sight to the satellite.  I know people that resorted to the old bucket of cement trick.  There are also tripods made specifically for satellite dishes.  The meter the techs have is nice because they are portable however the satellite receiver has a similar tool built right in to it.  It also has a tool to calculate what direction to point the Dish based on your area code.  It takes 2 people for best results.  Person 1 adjusts the Dish.  Person 2  looks at the TV and lets you know how the signal is.  1 person can do it but that take longer.  My father used to set his Dish up every time he moved his RV.  Approximately 30-40 times per year because they have been living in their RV and traveling since he and my mother retired.  They recently got a Dish that finds the satellite itself.  Conservatively they set up their old Dish 300 times by hand and they had no prior experience.  For anyone needing additional help see below.
http://forums.solidsignal.com/content.php/3716-Use-your-smartpho... 

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giqcass said:   imbatman said:   
kingdoodler88 said:   Never ever thought it was a good idea to install a Dish on my roof. Good way to fark up your roof. I always use a pole mount myself.
  back in the day when I requested DirectTV, I specifically asked for them to mount it to a pole.
They refused because the "signal wasn't strong enough".
installing a Dish yourself isn't always an option, you have to know where to point it, otherwise you just installed a lawn ornament.

  Installing a Dish yourself is pretty simple as long as you have a clear line of sight to the satellite.  I know people that resorted to the old bucket of cement trick.  There are also tripods made specifically for satellite dishes.  The meter the techs have is nice because they are portable however the satellite receiver has a similar tool built right in to it.  It also has a tool to calculate what direction to point the Dish based on your area code.  It takes 2 people for best results.  Person 1 adjusts the Dish.  Person 2  looks at the TV and lets you know how the signal is.  1 person can do it but that take longer.  My father used to set his Dish up every time he moved his RV.  Approximately 30-40 times per year because they have been living in their RV and traveling since he and my mother retired.  They recently got a Dish that finds the satellite itself.  Conservatively they set up their old Dish 300 times by hand and they had no prior experience.  For anyone needing additional help see below.
http://forums.solidsignal.com/content.php/3716-Use-your-smartpho... 

You're talking about spending a decent amount of time for something that's free (direct TV installation is free)

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#millennials

Man up son (or whatever you identify as).

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imbatman said:   
giqcass said:   
imbatman said:   
kingdoodler88 said:   Never ever thought it was a good idea to install a Dish on my roof. Good way to fark up your roof. I always use a pole mount myself.
  back in the day when I requested DirectTV, I specifically asked for them to mount it to a pole.
They refused because the "signal wasn't strong enough".
installing a Dish yourself isn't always an option, you have to know where to point it, otherwise you just installed a lawn ornament.

  Installing a Dish yourself is pretty simple as long as you have a clear line of sight to the satellite.  I know people that resorted to the old bucket of cement trick.  There are also tripods made specifically for satellite dishes.  The meter the techs have is nice because they are portable however the satellite receiver has a similar tool built right in to it.  It also has a tool to calculate what direction to point the Dish based on your area code.  It takes 2 people for best results.  Person 1 adjusts the Dish.  Person 2  looks at the TV and lets you know how the signal is.  1 person can do it but that take longer.  My father used to set his Dish up every time he moved his RV.  Approximately 30-40 times per year because they have been living in their RV and traveling since he and my mother retired.  They recently got a Dish that finds the satellite itself.  Conservatively they set up their old Dish 300 times by hand and they had no prior experience.  For anyone needing additional help see below.
http://forums.solidsignal.com/content.php/3716-Use-your-smartpho...
 

You're talking about spending a decent amount of time for something that's free (direct TV installation is free)

  Read the quote that I responded to.  I didn't suggest everyone do this but not all installations are free and the "free" installations come with a contract.  Additionally it appears the "free" installation the OP got might have broke his lease agreement and will cost the OP in the end.

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I wrote the quote you responded to....

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rufflesinc said:   
jman220 said:   
 d if just the plate is left behind it won't be noticeable.  

  Noticable or not, if it's in the roof, you won't know if there's a leak until too late. A competent landlord would remove everything and repair the roof fully

  
A smart landlord wouldn't have agreed to the installation into the roof in the first place. There are other ways to get satellite TV without drilling holes into the roof.
At this point, a competent landlord would just remove the Dish and pole and leave the mounting plate behind with some silicone to reduce the risks of a leak. And then keep a chunk of the security deposit based on the original agreement when the Dish was installed or whatever was in the lease.

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Not sure if anyone else can relate, but I was an early adopter of DirecTV. When it first came out their big selling point was offering superior picture quality to cable. Nothing was given away for free back then. As a videophile, I paid about $1000 between the Dish, single-tuner box, and install (and, yes, a decent chunk of that cost was for the install).

I don't really regret any of it, either. At the time, it really did offer superior PQ to cable. Sad to see that over the years they started over-compressing the channels and let PQ degrade so that they could offer a larger lineup of (mostly crappy) channels.

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rated:
Tenant had physical changes made to the property.  Tenant must pay cost of putting things back to their original condition.  Pay your bills, deadbeat!

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