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Payment with Visa Gift Cards with no name on them

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I recently tried to fund a new checking account with a Visa gift card purchased at a supermarket. There was no name (my name) on it. Only card number, expiration date and security code. But it was declined so I used a real credit card that worked. Is there any way (or hack) to avoid the name of cardholder when asked in such cases (paying taxes, etc.) when name on the card is asked in addition to card number, expiration date and security code? 

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Generally those cards don't care about name and address, they don't decline for that reason. More likely the bank blocked all cards of this type for opening deposit. You can usually "register" your name and address on the card issuer's website. Read the T&C.

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Data Point: Last time I registered on https://mygift.giftcardmall.com/ they only asked for card number, expiration date and 3-digit code. No mention of name or address.

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Accepting Visa gift cards with no name on them for opening deposits at banks is the kind of thing that makes AML risk management staff break out into hives.

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At least for most I've had, I can go to the website on the card, register the card and add my name, address and phone.  You won't get a new card with your name, but it will work for online peurchases that otherwise will be declined due to lack of, or a different name, address and phone number, except that for some cards, I've found that certain online sites, such as a cable provider, for example, won't accept the card number at all when I enter it.

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I've gotten these cards as compensation for participating in surveys, studies, and the like and have had generally awful luck dealing with them. I found them very hard to use for place like gas stations that asked for zip code verification (you usually had to go inside), as well as being nearly impossible to use both online and in person as partial payment for a purchase that exceeded the gift card balance.

In my case, a few have had fraudulent charges show up for even before I activated on the Giftcardmall.com site, including a $65 charge for a Pizza Hut 40 miles away which I'm just going to assume was for an employee appreciation lunch for a meth packaging operation. My theory is that thieves are able the get the card numbers on the rack at the retailer and then start repeatedly charging against all of them in knowing that at least some will hit when they're eventually purchased.

FWIW, I ended up adding these to my Amazon account as a "new" credit card ASAP and then promptly draining them for an Amazon gift card.

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cows123 said:   At least for most I've had, I can go to the website on the card, register the card and add my name, address and phone.  You won't get a new card with your name, but it will work for online peurchases that otherwise will be declined due to lack of, or a different name, address and phone number, except that for some cards, I've found that certain online sites, such as a cable provider, for example, won't accept the card number at all when I enter it.
By "except that for some cards" do you mean you couldn't add name/address/phone for certain cards on the website on the card? And certain online sites won't accept card numbers even if you could add name/address/phone?

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Randor said:   My theory is that thieves are able the get the card numbers on the rack at the retailer and then start repeatedly charging against all of them in knowing that at least some will hit when they're eventually purchased.Yes, but it's worse than that. Some of these cards (USBank) used to be (and maybe still are) basically sequentially (with a checksum) numbered, so knowing just one number a thief knows a whole batch that came before and after that number, and they'll most likely all have the same expiration date. CVV is more random, so they drain at places that don't require CVV.

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scripta said:   
Randor said:   My theory is that thieves are able the get the card numbers on the rack at the retailer and then start repeatedly charging against all of them in knowing that at least some will hit when they're eventually purchased.
Yes, but it's worse than that. Some of these cards (USBank) used to be (and maybe still are) basically sequentially (with a checksum) numbered, so knowing just one number a thief knows a whole batch that came before and after that number, and they'll most likely all have the same expiration date. CVV is more random, so they drain at places that don't require CVV.

  
CVV is encoded on the magnetic stripe only, and you will never see this number printed on the card.  The number on the back of the card is CVV2 (Visa), CVC2 (Mastercard), or CID (American Express, others).

CVV2 is actually a function of the card number, the expiration date, and a secret key that the issuer doesn't tell anyone.  That is why the CVV2 changes each time you get a new card with a new expiration date, even though the card number stays the same.

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GoldenSacks said:   
cows123 said:   At least for most I've had, I can go to the website on the card, register the card and add my name, address and phone.  You won't get a new card with your name, but it will work for online peurchases that otherwise will be declined due to lack of, or a different name, address and phone number, except that for some cards, I've found that certain online sites, such as a cable provider, for example, won't accept the card number at all when I enter it.
By "except that for some cards" do you mean you couldn't add name/address/phone for certain cards on the website on the card? And certain online sites won't accept card numbers even if you could add name/address/phone?

  Some companies choose not to accept prepaid cards. They can determine whether a card is a prepaid card based on the BIN number (first 6 digits of the card number). If they disallow certain BIN numbers, you can tell because they don't attempt an authorization on the card. As far as your name matching, there is no standard except for AMEX cards. Many companies don't rely on name matches because of false declines.

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