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Co-Owner of House Won't Agree to Sell. Options? Partition Action?

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Long version:
My married parents had a very poor relationship for many years. When my mom was diagnosed with cancer in 2015, I quit my job and took the blessing of becoming her sole caregiver. Due to my parentís bad relationship, my father did not contribute at all to taking care of mom; he simply left us to ourselves. My momís health deteriorated as time went by and she passed away in September last year. Given the situation, Iíve experienced a lot of grief, anger, and depression.

My parents jointly owned an $800k house, titled as†Joint Tenants, in California. Prior to my momís passing, she consulted an attorney and grant deeded her 50% ownership of the house into a trust. Since I was the sole beneficiary of the trust, I inherited her 50% ownership. As of October 2016, I am on title as†Tenants in Common†with my father. We each have 50% ownership of the house. My father currently lives in the house. I rent an apartment elsewhere.

Since inheriting ownership (on paper), my father has asked that I pay 50% of all expenses related to the house such as property taxes, insurance, repairs, and maintenance. Since I cannot afford this, I proposed to sell the house and split the proceeds. However, he rejected my proposal. Iíve also proposed that he buy out my share but that was rejected as well.

Since heís not willing to sell or buy me out, I requested for possession of the property. Perhaps I could move back in or rent out some rooms. At least I would have another option. Unsurprisingly, he also rejected my request for possession. My father has explicitly told me to take a hike and that he will not agree to sell the property under any circumstances. Since then, he has ceased all communications with me.

My goal is to fairly split the asset because
1) The house is currently a money pit
2) To honor my momís will to pass her only asset to me.


Can I sell my equity to a willing and capable buyer via a grant deed, without my father's blessings?
If not, I guess I have to file for partition?
What other options do I have to achieve my goal?†

TLDR:
- Co-own a house with my father 50/50 as Tenants in Common in California.
- I do not live in said house, my father does.
- I cannot afford to maintain the house and want to sell, he does not.
-†He will not buy me out. He will not let me access the property.
- He has told me to f*** off and stopped communicating with me.
- What are my options?

Sorry for alt-id

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rated:
Move into your house.

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Your father is basically got 1/2 of the payments and 100% of the house.
He can squat in there forever.

I bet if you try to move in he will stop you somehow (keys changed, stuff in all rooms etc)
This is ugly.

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I think this is a situation where you may want to consult an attorney. Perhaps speak to the same attorney that established the trust?†

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forbin4040 said:   Your father is basically got 1/2 of the payments and 100% of the house.
He can squat in there forever.

I bet if you try to move in he will stop you somehow (keys changed, stuff in all rooms etc)
This is ugly.


Locks were changed last year already. I am actually scared of moving in because he has guns.

Cashman said:   I think this is a situation where you may want to consult an attorney. Perhaps speak to the same attorney that established the trust?†

I've consulted the attorney that established the trust and was quoted $350/hr for his services to litigate a partition lawsuit. I haven't retained him yet because real estate isn't his main practice. He did tell me that it's a waste of money for both parties to litigate.

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Move in and then get a restraining order against him if he threatens you. This is your property, get aggressive.

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I assume you are not paying any of the expenses until he becomes more reasonable?

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Rajjeq said:   I assume you are not paying any of the expenses until he becomes more reasonable?

I haven't paid him anything because

1) I can't afford it: I'm renting an apartment and that's enough of a burden right now.

2) He hasn't produced any proof of the expenses (tax bill, maintenance bills, insurance bills, etc.)

3) He's not allowing me access to the property.


Is it reasonable to believe that he may be liable for paying my rent since he's not allowing me to access the property?

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TyroneBi said:   
Rajjeq said:   I assume you are not paying any of the expenses until he becomes more reasonable?

I haven't paid him anything because

1) I can't afford it: I'm renting an apartment and that's enough of a burden right now.

2) He hasn't produced any proof of the expenses (tax bill, maintenance bills, insurance bills, etc.)

3) He's not allowing me access to the property.


Is it reasonable to believe that he may be liable for paying my rent since he's not allowing me to access the property?

††
That's an entirely reasonable belief. †

If this were an amicable situation, and both parties were looking to be fair, but your father wanted to stay in the house, the way to work it out would be as follows (using made-up numbers):

Monthly house expenses (taxes, maintenance, insurance) = $2000
Fair market value for renting the house per month = $3000
Monthly "profit" = $1000

So, on net, your father pays the monthly expenses, and pays you half of the "profit," or $500/month. †

That way, you get the same as if he were to move out, and the two of your were to rent the house to a third party.†

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TyroneBi said:   
Rajjeq said:   I assume you are not paying any of the expenses until he becomes more reasonable?

I haven't paid him anything because

1) I can't afford it: I'm renting an apartment and that's enough of a burden right now.

2) He hasn't produced any proof of the expenses (tax bill, maintenance bills, insurance bills, etc.)

3) He's not allowing me access to the property.


Is it reasonable to believe that he may be liable for paying my rent since he's not allowing me to access the property?

††
No, that's not reasonable. Your dad saying, "you can't come here," in reference to property that you own means absolutely nothing. If you went to the house and used any means necessary to get in (walk in, pry open door, break window, etc.) short of committing assault and battery against your dad, you would not be arrested (as long as you have proof that you own the house).* So unless he physically stopped you from entering your property, his "not allowing you access" is just words. It doesn't entitle you to anything.

If he physically stopped you from entering your property, then you need to call the police so they can explain to him that he can't do that and he will be arrested if he does. Do you want to enter the property? Do you think he will physically stop you? If you think he will stop you, think again why you want to enter the property. Is it worth getting your dad arrested and him possibly coming back at you?†

With that being said, I don't recommend trying to go to the house or live in the house unless you absolutely need to based on the relationship you have with your dad that you have described. Whatever this house is worth, it's not worth having a horrible life and possibly getting the police called on you. Based on the facts you've described, you're in the right. But there is no telling what your dad will make up in order to get you out of the house. Don't put yourself in that situation.†

If we're talking about $400,000. It's definitely worth it to get an attorney involved so that you can get this done correctly.

*That's how it is in my state. It could differ in other states, but generally speaking, you can't be arrested for breaking into or vandalizing your own house, even if you have a roommate/family member with the same rights to the property as you. It becomes a civil matter at that point.

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Tax bills are public records.

I wonder if you can charge him 1/2 the fair market rent of the house for his sole use of your half. That should be a lot more than your half of the taxes and maintenance. Get a real estate lawyer who is a litigator rather than one who officiates at closings, and has a sense of humor.

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Sorry for what you're going through - this sounds like a lousy situation all around.

I would definitely contact a lawyer, unless your half is worth so little that spending a few thousand dollars on a lawyer wouldn't be worth it (or wouldn't be worth it now).

ETA: I missed the $800K number in the OP. Definitely get a lawyer.

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Sorry for your loss, OP.

I can't offer any real advice, but I'll be following the thread as it's a somewhat relevant situation to me.

I definitely agree that you need to find a good lawyer in this case. One thing that crossed my mind is that if this doesn't get resolved timely, your father may someday be able to strip you of your equity since you aren't contributing anything to the property expenses (not that I think you should be, of course). Good luck!

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An attorney definitely needs to be involved - you are talking about $400,000!

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Is there a mortgage?
If so, is it current?

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You need professional help.

I know lawyers cost a lot, but you need them.

Quite frankly, I don't understand why you have any ownership of the house if your mother and father had joint tenancy. He should own the entire house, and your title may not be valid.

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TyroneBi said:   I've consulted the attorney that established the trust and was quoted $350/hr for his services to litigate a partition lawsuit. I haven't retained him yet because real estate isn't his main practice. He did tell me that it's a waste of money for both parties to litigate.

wtf? that must be the dumbest lawyer on earth. usually we can at least expect them to be greedy, but this one can't even get that part right!†

$400k? get a lawyer. yes you can typically force the sale in situations like this, or the judge will have both parties enter an agreement, wherein you'd likely get income if market rent > expenses.

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I dont have anything more to add than saying you need professional advice. A few questions/comments:

1. Good for you to have taken the time off to be a caregiver for your mother. She likely cherished her last days/months on the earth with your love and care.
2. Please get some professional help for your grief, depressions etc.
3. Were your parents always (legally) married or did they divorce at some point?
4. Was your mother living in the house?
5. Did your mother contribute towards half the house expenses?

rated:
The value of the house is $800K .. but the house may have large mortgage on it. And if the dad is now hostile .. what's preventing him to take HELOC or something similar & totally drain out equity? Also if the dad isn't paying mortgage etc... is the OP liable for any of those payments?

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prozario said:   And if the dad is now hostile .. what's preventing him to take HELOC or something similar & totally drain out equity?
†well, a title search, for one.

also, regarding a current mortgage - seems like if there was one, ol' dad would be asking OP for half of that too.

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scrouds said:   You need professional help.

I know lawyers cost a lot, but you need them.

Quite frankly, I don't understand why you have any ownership of the house if your mother and father had joint tenancy. He should own the entire house, and your title may not be valid.

††
I agree with Scrouds. †You should make sure you have a valid claim to title by consulting with a lawyer.

You might be able to get †"free" initial consultation from a a lawyer through volunteers at your local Law Library. †For example, here is a link to the Los Angeles Law Library's service:
http://www.lalawlibrary.org/index.php/hidden-classes/178-lawyers-in-the-library.html

Also check the chain of title by going to your local county recorder's office. †You will want †to confirm that your Deed was recorded and that nothing was recorded before your deed †(e.g., †a mortgage with an amount that exceeds any potential equity you might have). †

rated:
Google Partition Action California and read "Suit for Partition - Your Legal Corner". Then hire an attorney. Expect a lengthy and expensive battle, and know that after winning and the property sale is forced, your father can do much to make it almost unsellable to anyone but a flipper (sold sight unseen). Value could drop to $300K easily, and you could spend $50K in legal bills without even trying. It's up to you what this is all worth.

I'm sorry your father turned out to be such a jerk, but then we knew that by his actions earlier.

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We picked up a nice house in New Orleans at the sheriffs auction from a partition sale. The litigation took a decade and almost all the proceeds went to the lawyers.

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ledwards said:   Google Partition Action California and read "Suit for Partition - Your Legal Corner". Then hire an attorney. Expect a lengthy and expensive battle, and know that after winning and the property sale is forced, your father can do much to make it almost unsellable to anyone but a flipper (sold sight unseen). Value could drop to $300K easily, and you could spend $50K in legal bills without even trying. It's up to you what this is all worth.

I'm sorry your father turned out to be such a jerk, but then we knew that by his actions earlier.††

I agree that partition is definitely not the best financial move for either party. But as it stands, OP gets nothing but bills and liabilities until father dies or sells the property which may be decades. And by then, who knows how much it could cost him or the future value of the property if father does not maintain it well.

Eventually half of the property value will get to OP provided the 50% ownership of the house is valid. If OP is willing to wait on that money, he may stand to gain vs. partition lawsuit now. However, if OP wants money right now while removing liabilities or just to spite his father, partition may be better. Also, counsel for the father and/or judge may advise him that more friendly agreement is better financially than going through with the lawsuit. OP won't be able to provide an incentive to settle between them until a partition lawsuit is filed. So there's really no recourse other than partition lawsuit in case of joint owners not agreeing on sale of a property or other resolution.

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If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.

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prozario said:   The value of the house is $800K .. but the house may have large mortgage on it. And if the dad is now hostile .. what's preventing him to take HELOC or something similar & totally drain out equity? Also if the dad isn't paying mortgage etc... is the OP liable for any of those payments?
† He can't get a HELOC. †The son is on the deed, so he'd have to sign off on a mortgage.

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According to the bible, King Solomon once offered to cut a baby in half to settle a dispute, and he was able to find the true mother of the baby. You can use the same logic and offer to cut the house in half.

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goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
That's assuming dad continues to pay all expenses. OP as joint owner is responsible for half the taxes. †If dad only pays his half of the taxes, OP will be impacted. Credit record will show delinquency, penalties and interest on the tax will accumulate. First liens on the house will be placed. Eventually, that will end up in foreclosure. Not a much better outcome than partition lawsuit. It would not incur as much in attorney fees but value of the property will likely be depressed still and penalties and interest on tax will take away some value as well. And OP could suffer consequence from the foreclosure on his credit record.

rated:
goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
† For all we know, the Dad may live another 30-40 years and then still screw over the son at that time by giving his share to another hostile party. So waiting with no resolution seems like a bad idea.

rated:
TheDealMaker said:   According to the bible, King Solomon once offered to cut a baby in half to settle a dispute, and he was able to find the true mother of the baby. You can use the same logic and offer to cut the house in half.
††
Given that he's not trying to find out who the builder was, not sure if this would help...

rated:
Rent your half out to some big bad ex-cons or gangsters for well below market rent.

rated:
Shandril said:   
goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
That's assuming dad continues to pay all expenses. OP as joint owner is responsible for half the taxes. †If dad only pays his half of the taxes, OP will be impacted. Credit record will show delinquency, penalties and interest on the tax will accumulate. First liens on the house will be placed. Eventually, that will end up in foreclosure. Not a much better outcome than partition lawsuit. It would not incur as much in attorney fees but value of the property will likely be depressed still and penalties and interest on tax will take away some value as well. And OP could suffer consequence from the foreclosure on his credit record.

I happen to think that foreclosure would be a pretty GOOD option for OP. since OP doesnt seem to have the money to pay for the whole partition suit, then getting proceeds split at a foreclosure auction sounds like a decent outcome. typically property is auctioned, and gets anywhere from 50-90% of FMV. subtract taxes and sheriff's costs and OP would still [probably] get a decent sum, plus like you said it'll be mostly undiluted by excessive attorney fees.

unfortunately, unpaid back taxes take quite awhile to actually lose the property...and it's not via foreclosure, it's by quieting title. where I live, it takes about 4 years from the date of the unpaid bill. most places it's 6+. Not sure what the rules are in CA, maybe another tax title investor can weigh in.

OP - i would start at land records and see if there's a mortgage recorded against the property. that's an important piece of info that's [almost] free to obtain.

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solarUS said:   
Shandril said:   
goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
That's assuming dad continues to pay all expenses. OP as joint owner is responsible for half the taxes. †If dad only pays his half of the taxes, OP will be impacted. Credit record will show delinquency, penalties and interest on the tax will accumulate. First liens on the house will be placed. Eventually, that will end up in foreclosure. Not a much better outcome than partition lawsuit. It would not incur as much in attorney fees but value of the property will likely be depressed still and penalties and interest on tax will take away some value as well. And OP could suffer consequence from the foreclosure on his credit record.

I happen to think that foreclosure would be a pretty GOOD option for OP. since OP doesnt seem to have the money to pay for the whole partition suit, then getting proceeds split at a foreclosure auction sounds like a decent outcome. typically property is auctioned, and gets anywhere from 50-90% of FMV. subtract taxes and sheriff's costs and OP would still [probably] get a decent sum, plus like you said it'll be mostly undiluted by excessive attorney fees.

unfortunately, unpaid back taxes take quite awhile to actually lose the property...and it's not via foreclosure, it's by quieting title. where I live, it takes about 4 years from the date of the unpaid bill. most places it's 6+. Not sure what the rules are in CA, maybe another tax title investor can weigh in.

OP - i would start at land records and see if there's a mortgage recorded against the property. that's an important piece of info that's [almost] free to obtain.

††

†As stupid as its sounds ... once the house goes up for sale for taxes the govt keeps the entire amount. At least it was that way before in NY state. Sean Hannity was railing about it before. Not sure how to google to see if cali is one of those states or not

EDIT some states are one †way .. some are the other. Ive looked as much as im going to.

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The mistake in all this was that your mother should have filed for divorce from your father long ago. Her setting up the trust to give you 1/2 the house was no gift, it was a burden she didn't want to deal with (again, long before she got ill). Hire a lawyer, who will file for partition. Thousands of dollars later, when your father can't buy you out, the house will go up for sale. During that time, he will probably trash it.

Many years ago, we toured a home for sale. Something seemed not right, messes here and there. Walked into master bedroom, found a dump on the floor. Appeared human, no sign of pets. Discovered husband would not vacate home and was doing everything possible to avoid it selling. Sheriff eventually forcibly evicted him.

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owenscott said:   
solarUS said:   
Shandril said:   
goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
That's assuming dad continues to pay all expenses. OP as joint owner is responsible for half the taxes. †If dad only pays his half of the taxes, OP will be impacted. Credit record will show delinquency, penalties and interest on the tax will accumulate. First liens on the house will be placed. Eventually, that will end up in foreclosure. Not a much better outcome than partition lawsuit. It would not incur as much in attorney fees but value of the property will likely be depressed still and penalties and interest on tax will take away some value as well. And OP could suffer consequence from the foreclosure on his credit record.

I happen to think that foreclosure would be a pretty GOOD option for OP. since OP doesnt seem to have the money to pay for the whole partition suit, then getting proceeds split at a foreclosure auction sounds like a decent outcome. typically property is auctioned, and gets anywhere from 50-90% of FMV. subtract taxes and sheriff's costs and OP would still [probably] get a decent sum, plus like you said it'll be mostly undiluted by excessive attorney fees.

unfortunately, unpaid back taxes take quite awhile to actually lose the property...and it's not via foreclosure, it's by quieting title. where I live, it takes about 4 years from the date of the unpaid bill. most places it's 6+. Not sure what the rules are in CA, maybe another tax title investor can weigh in.

OP - i would start at land records and see if there's a mortgage recorded against the property. that's an important piece of info that's [almost] free to obtain.

†As stupid as its sounds ... once the house goes up for sale for taxes the govt keeps the entire amount. At least it was that way before in NY state. Sean Hannity was railing about it before. Not sure how to google to see if cali is one of those states or not

EDIT some states are one †way .. some are the other. Ive looked as much as im going to.

† No, the taxes are paid first, then the auctioneer followed by other lien holders in order of preference. Finally, any excess goes to the property owner.

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EradicateSpam said:   Walked into master bedroom, found a dump on the floor. Appeared human, no sign of pets. Discovered husband would not vacate home and was doing everything possible to avoid it selling.†
† Pics?

rated:
stanolshefski said:   
owenscott said:   
solarUS said:   
Shandril said:   
goku2 said:   If OP tries to act amicably to a hostile party and that hostile party is doing what he can to stay/maintain the property, wouldn't it make more sense for OP to leave well enough alone? I'm just trying to think what can OP do to minimize risk of a lot of mechanics loans or something that would severely devalue the property in the future while minimizing cost. I mean if partition litigation becomes a zero sum game and OP's dad is paying all the expenses related to the property, seems he'd be better of just waiting out the dad.
That's assuming dad continues to pay all expenses. OP as joint owner is responsible for half the taxes. †If dad only pays his half of the taxes, OP will be impacted. Credit record will show delinquency, penalties and interest on the tax will accumulate. First liens on the house will be placed. Eventually, that will end up in foreclosure. Not a much better outcome than partition lawsuit. It would not incur as much in attorney fees but value of the property will likely be depressed still and penalties and interest on tax will take away some value as well. And OP could suffer consequence from the foreclosure on his credit record.

I happen to think that foreclosure would be a pretty GOOD option for OP. since OP doesnt seem to have the money to pay for the whole partition suit, then getting proceeds split at a foreclosure auction sounds like a decent outcome. typically property is auctioned, and gets anywhere from 50-90% of FMV. subtract taxes and sheriff's costs and OP would still [probably] get a decent sum, plus like you said it'll be mostly undiluted by excessive attorney fees.

unfortunately, unpaid back taxes take quite awhile to actually lose the property...and it's not via foreclosure, it's by quieting title. where I live, it takes about 4 years from the date of the unpaid bill. most places it's 6+. Not sure what the rules are in CA, maybe another tax title investor can weigh in.

OP - i would start at land records and see if there's a mortgage recorded against the property. that's an important piece of info that's [almost] free to obtain.

†As stupid as its sounds ... once the house goes up for sale for taxes the govt keeps the entire amount. At least it was that way before in NY state. Sean Hannity was railing about it before. Not sure how to google to see if cali is one of those states or not

EDIT some states are one †way .. some are the other. Ive looked as much as im going to.

† No, the taxes are paid first, then the auctioneer followed by other lien holders in order of preference. Finally, any excess goes to the property owner.

you people are conflating issues. foreclosure sales and tax sales are handled very differently.

that scandal in NY state from a few years back was a one-off and not typical for other states...basically developers exploiting a loophole that permitted them to steal equity via inflated attorney's charges.

rated:
OP,

Joint Tenants have right of survivorship. That is, when your father passes away, you will get the whole house. (Now, unsure whether your father has put his share into a trust like your Mom did. Of course, in that instance, it would pass down to this trust, and you would not get the house.)

To answer your question, technically yes, you can rent out or sell your share of the joint tenancy. Practically, no one will buy it. Unsure whether you would want to rent it out, I would not want to put anyone in harm's way.

OP, I think you have two viable options: 1) Let it go into foreclosure (or of sorts) as solarUS suggests, or wait till your Dad passes away. You will either get the whole house, (or the person named in the trust, will be more reasonable). I would not actively do anything, and just let it play out.

OP, the other thing I might suggest is to try to make amends with your father. It sounds like he is deeply hurt (it does not matter whether his reasons are valid or not, his feeling are real to him), and he is very angry. People don't just decide to be jerks to their kids, they have a reason. OP, if you truly wish to honor your mother's request, I would keep the big picture in focus, and not let things like your father's childish behavior distract you. What your father is doing is noise, you're smarter than this. Seek to understand him, treat him like a son/daughter should treat his father, I truly believe he will come around.

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TyroneBi said:   
Rajjeq said:   I assume you are not paying any of the expenses until he becomes more reasonable?

I haven't paid him anything because

1) I can't afford it: I'm renting an apartment and that's enough of a burden right now.

2) He hasn't produced any proof of the expenses (tax bill, maintenance bills, insurance bills, etc.)

3) He's not allowing me access to the property.


Is it reasonable to believe that he may be liable for paying my rent since he's not allowing me to access the property?

††
He wants you to pay half for maintenance (mostly generated from his usage), repairs (also from his usage) and insurance/taxes? And you're not allowed to move in or sell the property?

Please tell me you laughed in his face or something.

At this point, paying him anything would definitely be the wrong choice. However, since he is squatting there I would PRESUME he is paying the taxes/insurance. I'm not sure if that's a dangerous presumption or not, because it might backfire if the house title is taken for not paying taxes. ]

As others have said, this is a very tricky situation. I honestly can't tell you what the correct course of action would be. I would actually hope that he is old/unhealthy and passes away shortly instead of wasting hundreds of thousands of dollars for attorney advice and potential dragged out court dates. That sounds more like a lose-lose.

Skipping 92 Messages...
rated:
imbatman said:   defaulting on a loan sends you to the slammer?You didn't hear about the executive order that brought back debtor's prison?
††

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