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Is a REIT a stock, bond, other for tax purposes? Is it taxable if transfered to Roth IRA?

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I bought shares of Vanguard's REIT fund when the housing market bottomed out about ten years ago and last April I transferred all of it to a Roth IRA, making the maximum contribution for 2015 and putting the remainder into the 2016 contribution (didn't max it out though). I've got a 1099B that records the exchange but I can't figure out how to report this on my taxes, if it counts as a stock or something else, and if I have to pay capital gains to a Roth IRA since it says it's a transfer rather than sale. 

Does anyone know how to report this? Help! 

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rated:
You can't transfer assets to an IRA to make a contribution. You sold the asset in the taxable account and repurchased it in the Roth IRA.

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I don't understand what you mean by "I transferred all of it to a Roth IRA."  As far as I know, IRA custodians do not let you transfer taxable assets to retirement accounts (because it would be a massive loophole to avoid capital gains on appreciated taxable assets).  If the REIT is owned in a Roth, none of the income it generates is taxable.  Are you asking what the tax effect is of selling it in your brokerage account (as reported on the 1099-B)?  If so, it is taxed as reported on the 1099, presumably a long-term capital gain.  It's a mutual fund.

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stanolshefski said:   You can't transfer assets to an IRA to make a contribution. You sold the asset in the taxable account and repurchased it in the Roth IRA.
  Yeah that's basically what I figured but I wanted to be sure.

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raringvt said:   I don't understand what you mean by "I transferred all of it to a Roth IRA."  As far as I know, IRA custodians do not let you transfer taxable assets to retirement accounts (because it would be a massive loophole to avoid capital gains on appreciated taxable assets).  If the REIT is owned in a Roth, none of the income it generates is taxable.  Are you asking what the tax effect is of selling it in your brokerage account (as reported on the 1099-B)?  If so, it is taxed as reported on the 1099, presumably a long-term capital gain.  It's a mutual fund.

The REIT is listed on the 1099Div and 1099B as an Index fund. The difference between an index fund and a mutual fund isn't really clear to me. Since I'm doing my taxes through H&R Block 's free file, I'm trying to figure out if it report selling it as a Stock, Mutual Fund, or "other." You think mutual fund, even though it says index?

  Like the person above said about "transferring it," I basically had to sell it off and then buy into the Roth IRA. 

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Vanguards REIT fund is a mutual fund that is an index fund. Its a mutual fund.   Index funds are a kind of mutual fund.

VGSIX right?

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jerosen said:   Vanguards REIT fund is a mutual fund that is an index fund. Its a mutual fund.   Index funds are a kind of mutual fund.

VGSIX right?

  
VGSLX... assuming that's the same thing, I think it got it squared away. Thanks everyone!!

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Was it previously in an IRA and converted to your Roth?

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raringvt said:   If the REIT is owned in a Roth, none of the income it generates is taxable.  
  Since REITs are technically pass through vehicles, you could theoretically end up with unrelated business taxable income that would be subject to tax. Not sure how often it comes up, but if the REIT is investing in mortgages or REMICs, it could cause problems.

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