VERY OLD debt collection attempt

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Well over ten years ago, there was a debt collection claim which made it to the credit bureaus, several snail mails, telephone calls, etc. All that had become ancient history as it finally fell off all credit bureaus, phone calls and letters stopped,  I am sure it was sold a few times in hope I would fall for it and pay something.  I never did.  Today, I got a collection letter which I associate with that claim.  The fine print acknowledges the claim is so old, they will not pursue me in any court and not file any claim on any credit bureau.  It has the usual thirty day no response validates the debt language..
Since it has no muscle, I am inclined not to respond. Reason - If I respond, that gives them current information and some creditability to keep after me.  That would in effect acknowledge the debt claim,
FWF thoughts are invited.

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"ethical" and "moral" are words that should never be used in reference to debt collectors.

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When their shenanigans and lies and horribly risky investments all came crashing down on them and dragging the whole nat... (more)

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Look up Statute of Limitations for debt in your state. If it's past it then submit a written letter to stop contacting you.

Shred it

speedracer714 said:   Look up Statute of Limitations for debt in your state. If it's past it then submit a written letter to stop contacting you.
  Be careful before you do this.

Toss it.

Shove it.

You aren't going BK right?

Because SCOTUS said the can bother you during BK proceedings
http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/05/us_supreme_court_rules_...

A cease communication letter is probably the best bet if you don't want to be bothered with this.

Do nothing.

forbin4040 said:   You aren't going BK right?

Because SCOTUS said the can bother you during BK proceedings
http://www.al.com/news/index.ssf/2017/05/us_supreme_court_rules_...

  
No danger of BK. I am not rich, but healthy enough to meet my needs and do some MS to boot.  FICO is healthy with no such negatives.

JW10 said:   It has the usual thirty day no response validates the debt language..Really? Sounds like a "guilty until proven innocent" scare tactic to me. Is it really that usual, and legal?

what letter?

scripta said:   
JW10 said:   It has the usual thirty day no response validates the debt language..
Really? Sounds like a "guilty until proven innocent" scare tactic to me. Is it really that usual, and legal?

  
See http://www.t-mlaw.com/blog/post/keep-it-simple-use-the-fair-debt-collection-practices-act-to-your-advantage/ 

Write them a letter stating that you don't have any idea what they are talking about.Ask them to provide verification/ validation of the original debt.Send the letter Certified mail or something that requires a signature...That will let them know you know your rights and are not to be messed with.They should go away.
Lots of examples of really good letters on the Internet.My Mom went through a period when she was receiving Lots of phone calls and letters...This letter made them all go away, quit calling her....Never heard from them again.
Just my opinion...

Ignore it.

They are trying to get you to reaffirm the debt.

I doubt the agency paid more than .003 on the dollar on that debt.

zapjb said:   Ignore it.

They are trying to get you to reaffirm the debt.

I doubt the agency paid more than .003 on the dollar on that debt.

  
They probably spent more on POSTAGE than they did for the debt.  

Ever thought of paying your legal debt. Sounds like the honest response.

If its a legitimate debt, then pay the original debtor, just to clear your conscience. Like someone else said, these guys paid pennies on the dollar for it, but the original debtor lost money.

Why not just pay your debt then?

Send a FOAD letter.
Go to creditboards find a sample letter.

zane8521 said:   Ever thought of paying your legal debt. Sounds like the honest response.
  Sometimes you can't do that. If that debt is that old plus it has been sold, then the original debtor (maybe a CC?) probably doesn't even have a record of it anymore.

JW10 said:   scripta said:   JW10 said:   It has the usual thirty day no response validates the debt language..Really? Sounds like a "guilty until proven innocent" scare tactic to me. Is it really that usual, and legal?See http://www.t-mlaw.com/blog/post/keep-it-simple-use-the-fair-debt-collection-practices-act-to-your-advantage/LOL, of course. For some reason the knowledge of "must request validation within 30 days of receipt" didn't connect with "no response validates the debt" in my silly head.

Take a look at your credit report and see if there was a recent "payment" was made on this outstanding debt. I had a similar situation where the debt had dropped off several years prior, then the account was sold to some shady collection agency, they recorded a "payment" to the account which essentially renewed the debt. I found in my attempts it was impossible to remove the information, even after disputing with all three credit bureaus. I was able to prove that the debt was old, previously written off, etc. The creditor apparently produced fictitious records, and the credit bureaus then legitimized the debt as valid, again.

So, to make a long story short...all I would do is dispute the entry with the 3 major credit bureaus IF it on your credit report, in hopes they see it's a scam and just delete it. Then, go on with life and ignore it. I even started to recognize the letters they sent and would write on the letter "Moved, no forwarding address" and would drop it in the post office's outgoing mail. Eventually, they went away and eventually it fell off my credit report, again.

My debt was for defective furniture I purchased when I first started out in life. A couch, loveseat, etc. About 6 weeks after receiving it the stitching was coming loose EVERYWHERE. Absolute garbage, it was literally falling apart. However I paid thousands for the furniture from what was known as a reputable company. I went to the store 6 times to resolve and ask for replacement furniture, and all 6 times they gave me a load of crap of this or that and the steps for "repairing" the furniture, etc. Eventually I sent the store, corporate office, and the finance company certified letters as to where their property could be collected and that I would not pay anything additional until I was satisfied with replacement furniture. They ignored my letters, I ignored their bills, collection agencies, etc.

zane8521 said:   Ever thought of paying your legal debt. Sounds like the honest response.
  Of course that's the obvious response and action, however there are sometimes legitimate circumstances that complicate the typical and usual process of paying debt.

you already been putting it off for 10 years. keep putting it off. what's another 5 years? dont ever let them know where you are then they'll keep bothering you. Do not fall for their tricks. They dont want to forgive anything they want to take money from you.

zane8521 said:   Ever thought of paying your legal debt. Sounds like the honest response.
  I did not pay it because I sincerely believed then and now it was not my legal debt, but bad bookkeeping by the party making the claim.  AFIK, it was properly paid long before any collection agency tried to collect.  Every effort I made to have the original party making the claim correct their error failed.  I stood on principle even tho I later learned how credit works when things go differently than textbook as in this case.

It has been sold a few times to unsuspecting companies that do not know the score.  Looks like they found a sucker to take it off their hands.

Xnarg1 said:   
zane8521 said:   Ever thought of paying your legal debt. Sounds like the honest response.
  Sometimes you can't do that. If that debt is that old plus it has been sold, then the original debtor (maybe a CC?) probably doesn't even have a record of it anymore.

  
From what I understand, giving in any payment (even partial) to a debt re-opens the statue of limitations and makes you liable for a brand new set of 7 years. 

Payment is essentially admission of guilt. Don't do it.

I would say pay the debt off. It is the ethical and moral thing to do.
 

DB

trumpotron said:   DB
Dead Beat?
Douche Bag?
Dirty Blonde?

justignoredem said:   ... the statue of limitations ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrKb2TTy2ik 



  

laidone said:   I would say pay the debt off. It is the ethical and moral thing to do.I would say read the thread before posting. It is the ethical and moral thing to do.

atikovi said:   ?Don't feed the trumpotroll.

So you don't get it either huh.  Your word is your bond.  It took me 7 years with three jobs to pay my debts, doesn't make me better but has made me smarter.  Our nation's debt problems started with our debts and loopholes to use not to pay them.  Sadly some of those debts cant be helped.  So yes, moral and ethical but doesn't make them illegal.
 

laidone said:   So you don't get it either huh.  Your word is your bond.  It took me 7 years with three jobs to pay my debts, doesn't make me better but has made me smarter.  Our nation's debt problems started with our debts and loopholes to use not to pay them.  Sadly some of those debts cant be helped.  So yes, moral and ethical but doesn't make them illegal.
  
I and the wife did the same thing, took the better part of 9 years to pay off our youth stupidity...but we did it, all of it. Now only student loans...and a mortgage to match the student-loan debt is all that's left. We did it...folks on both sides of the families and subsequent adult baby children did not. In the long run guess who is better off.  

Anyways this is not to say that one should FOAD this zombie debt. I would actually push it hard and see if they are violating any laws, if so SUE and SUE hard. F shady debt collectors, f them right in the ear.   

jonesjeremya said:   ...

My debt was for defective furniture I purchased when I first started out in life. A couch, loveseat, etc. About 6 weeks after receiving it the stitching was coming loose EVERYWHERE. Absolute garbage, it was literally falling apart. However I paid thousands for the furniture from what was known as a reputable company. I went to the store 6 times to resolve and ask for replacement furniture, and all 6 times they gave me a load of crap of this or that and the steps for "repairing" the furniture, etc. Eventually I sent the store, corporate office, and the finance company certified letters as to where their property could be collected and that I would not pay anything additional until I was satisfied with replacement furniture. They ignored my letters, I ignored their bills, collection agencies, etc.

  Was it Ashley Furniture?

TheDiggler said:   
justignoredem said:   ... the statue of limitations ...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XrKb2TTy2ik 



  

  
Oh gee that made me laugh way too hard at work.

Alright alright, that's a spelling issue I'm going to remember every time I type that word going forward.

laidone said:   So you don't get it either huh.  Your word is your bond.  It took me 7 years with three jobs to pay my debts, doesn't make me better but has made me smarter.OP already said he does not believe it was his debt. Even if it was his, the debt has since been sold and resold -- no part of any payment would go to the original creditor, but to vulture debt collectors trying to pick through debt that's legally dead. As far as being smarter, I think JW10 has that covered.

laidone said:   Our nation's debt problems started with our debts and loopholes to use not to pay them. Sadly some of those debts cant be helped. So yes, moral and ethical but doesn't make them illegal.I'm confused by this -- are you implying that the national debt has something to do with our consumer debt? Because it doesn't. If you're talking about the total consumer debt, you're also implying that there's a problem. There was a problem a decade ago with banks losing lots of money on bad debts, but I don't see one now with banks making record profits.

JW10 said:   Well over ten years ago, there was a debt collection claim which made it to the credit bureaus, several snail mails, telephone calls, etc. All that had become ancient history as it finally fell off all credit bureaus, phone calls and letters stopped,  I am sure it was sold a few times in hope I would fall for it and pay something.  I never did.  Today, I got a collection letter which I associate with that claim.  The fine print acknowledges the claim is so old, they will not pursue me in any court and not file any claim on any credit bureau.  It has the usual thirty day no response validates the debt language..
Since it has no muscle, I am inclined not to respond. Reason - If I respond, that gives them current information and some creditability to keep after me.  That would in effect acknowledge the debt claim,
FWF thoughts are invited.

I don't open ANY mail from a company that I don't recognize. A quick internet search of the street address or p.o.box & zip code will give you most of the information you need before you write or rubber stamp "return to sender" with your name/address crossed off of the unopened mail.

Skipping 5 Messages...
And you know who is going to gut financial regulations again. Middle class is gone. Stock up on cat food now to avoid the rush.



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