• filter:

Credit report dispute

  • Page :
  • 1
  • Text Only
  • Search this Topic »
Voting History
rated:
About two years ago, my doctor sent me to physical therapy. Instead of helping me rehab the injury, they made it much worse. When I saw my doctor he ordered me to stop and put me in a boot for something like 6-8 weeks. I called the PT provider to cancel my scheduled appointments, told them why, and asked to speak to someone about billing. In fact, I called about 5 times. Emailed a few times as well. They did not respond. Two months later, they emailed me a full bill and I responded with something like, "You guys injured me. I called several times to settle up and now this? Call me."

Three months ago, a collections agency called and I told them the charge was bs. I saw my doctor soon afterward, who had removed them from his list of preferred PT providers specifically due to what they did with me. I asked him to call and tell them what they did, ask to remove the charge. He promised several times to do it but hasn't followed through. I think it's safe to assume my doctor wants nothing to do with the dispute at this point so I'm on my own. I recently found out they sent my "debt" to the credit reporting companies. Never having been in this position, I'm not sure what to do.

I called the PT office on Thursday, no returned call. I even sent the owner a msg over Instagram asking for a return call, nothing. What is the best way to get these charges off my record? I have obviously tried numerous times to speak with the PT provider and they did not return. Even when I started and said, I'm injured, please call. This is ridiculous and negligent on their part... but what can I do to stop it right now?




 

Member Summary
Staff Summary
Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

rated:
I would first pop up at the office and talk to someone in person to see if you can get a resolution that way.

rated:
That's what I wanted to do. If the owner took my call, I was going to ask when I can stop by. It's the human solution. As I don't know the legal process, I'm getting more defensive in how I approach this every time I'm rebuffed.

rated:
I wouldn't bother with any further attempts at direct resolution. I went to creditboards.com and followed whychat's advice for disputing bogus medical debt, though it all seemed generic to any kind of debt. You don't need to get into the story at all. It took a couple of months, but 2 agencies dropped the entry after my first mail to them, the other did after a single followup to that.

rated:
I wouldn't bother with any further attempts at direct resolution. I went to creditboards.com and followed whychat's advice for disputing bogus medical debt, though it all seemed generic to any kind of debt. You don't need to get into the story at all. It took a couple of months, but 2 agencies dropped the entry after my first mail to them, the other did after a single followup to that.


_______
vital


rated:
While talking is good, and can be helpful, ultimately proving your case will depend upon written documentation.  I would suggest that you gather, as soon as possible, any already-existing written documentation pertaining to your situation.  

You could print out your emails (and be careful not to delete the actual emails).  

Also, most physician's offices have a standard form that you can fill out to request copies of the physician's records pertaining to your visits, treatment, etc.  You could request the blank form from your physician's office staff and fill it out and return it to them.  Sometimes offices charge a small fee for copying.  That's okay.  In any case, it is good generally to have copies of your medical records.

The PT provider might also have such a form that you could fill out to request your medical records.  This might not pertain directly to your billing problem, but you never know.

The creditboards.com recommendation is probably good (I haven't read it).  Hopefully it will guide you regarding what steps to take.

--

Edited to add:  If you make any more phone calls (or receive phone calls), be sure to keep "contemporaneous" notes -- the date, time, phone #, who you talked with, and who said what.  Same for any in-person conversations.  Sometimes such notes can have legal value.  More often, the value is to the note-taker personally.  For processes that drag out over time, taking notes can help you to keep track of what's going on, who you talked with, and who said exactly what.

  • Quick Reply:  Have something quick to contribute? Just reply below and you're done! hide Quick Reply
     
    Click here for full-featured reply.


Disclaimer: By providing links to other sites, FatWallet.com does not guarantee, approve or endorse the information or products available at these sites, nor does a link indicate any association with or endorsement by the linked site to FatWallet.com.

Thanks for visiting FatWallet.com. Join for free to remove this ad.

While FatWallet makes every effort to post correct information, offers are subject to change without notice.
Some exclusions may apply based upon merchant policies.
© 1999-2017