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People need food in order to survive.  Thus, food is a principal cost center for most individuals and families.  There is the monetary cost, of course, first and foremost.  But there are in addition many other food acquisition considerations which relate to non-monetary cost aspects of the process.  Consumer Reports has rolled all this up into one giant ball and rated a number of the most prominent food providers in America:

Food providers ranked 

So much depends upon where you live.  We are fortunate to be able to accomplish the majority of our food acquisition at the #1 and #13 ranked providers in this survey.  This really helps to minimize costs of all sorts.

 

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The size of the check each company writes to consumer reports.

wilesmt (Jun. 09, 2017 @ 7:53p) |

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rufflesinc (Jun. 09, 2017 @ 7:55p) |

It is even more than a company downsizing, manufacturers will create different products for a chain, I worked in grocery... (more)

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What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."
I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

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Also ... Article title "Best to worst", actual list "worst to best". That's some fine attention to detail...

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Sorry bud, but you say 'Cost of food' then give us a opinon ranking of supermarkets.

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As I was scrolling down, I kept waiting to see "Costco: 100". I was close.

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More interesting, at least to me:

+  Comparing US, UK, Japan and Canada, 2009: "The U.S. spends the lowest percentage of its income on food. U.S. citizens spend 14% of their income on food (8.3% at home and 5.8% at restaurants) while at the other end of the spectrum Japan spends 21.8% of their income on food and Canada only spends slightly more than the U.S. at 14.8% while the U.K. spends 19.9%."

+ For a meal basket consisting of “one loaf of bread, one pound of coffee, one dozen eggs, three pounds of mid-price beef, one box of Corn Flakes or Cheerios, five pounds of potatoes and one Hershey bar.” ... A minimum wage earner would have to work 9.25 hours in 1938 to buy this food. But by 1961 a minimum wage earner only had to work 3.75 hours to buy the same food. Since then the number of hours needed stayed about the same during the 1970’s but spiked to 5.5 hours in 1981 and subsequently dropped back to about 4 hours.

https://inflationdata.com/articles/2012/03/26/cost-of-living-foo...

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Bend3r said:   Also ... Article title "Best to worst", actual list "worst to best". That's some fine attention to detail...
  And once again in this type of thing, Ralphs is misspelled. (The apostrophe should be after the "s")

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george2001 said:   
Bend3r said:   Also ... Article title "Best to worst", actual list "worst to best". That's some fine attention to detail...
  And once again in this type of thing, Ralphs is misspelled. (The apostrophe should be after the "s")

  Ralphs has no apostrophe. I don't always correct others' spelling, but when I do, I do it correctly.

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I've been all over the U.S. and I've never heard of most of these grocery stores.

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You are a COW! You don't go to grocery stores! WE go to grocery stores to buy YOU!

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qcumber98 said:   I've been all over the U.S. and I've never heard of most of these grocery stores.
  Heb will slowly wipe every other chain out.  They expand slowly but they drive out all the other grocery stores and basically become a monopoly.  The other stores can't compete in price and much of their store brand stuff is decent quality.  (Annoyingly they remove selection / variety stuff to prioritize store brand on display space).  It's crazy though when I go on vacation and the grocery stores have everything marked at about double a realistic price, with about 10% of the merchandise on "2 for 1 With Club card" sales.

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tuphat said:   More interesting, at least to me:

+  Comparing US, UK, Japan and Canada, 2009: "The U.S. spends the lowest percentage of its income on food. U.S. citizens spend 14% of their income on food (8.3% at home and 5.8% at restaurants) while at the other end of the spectrum Japan spends 21.8% of their income on food and Canada only spends slightly more than the U.S. at 14.8% while the U.K. spends 19.9%."
There's a lot of cheap, tasteless ... wood pulp in the USA that passes as "food." Farm subsidies and cheap labor probably don't hurt either.

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scripta said:   
tuphat said:   More interesting, at least to me:

+  Comparing US, UK, Japan and Canada, 2009: "The U.S. spends the lowest percentage of its income on food. U.S. citizens spend 14% of their income on food (8.3% at home and 5.8% at restaurants) while at the other end of the spectrum Japan spends 21.8% of their income on food and Canada only spends slightly more than the U.S. at 14.8% while the U.K. spends 19.9%."

There's a lot of cheap, tasteless ... wood pulp in the USA that passes as "food." Farm subsidies and cheap labor probably don't hurt either.

  even the popular "restaurants" fall into that descrption

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This would have been a better list.  Same survey, much better information.

Consumer Reports: Where to Find the Best Grocery Store Prices in America

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Wegmans (no apostrophe) is pretty darn good. I'd go nuts if my only grocery option was Kroger or Safeway or Walamrt(!!)

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dcwilbur said:   This would have been a better list.  Same survey, much better information.

Consumer Reports: Where to Find the Best Grocery Store Prices in America

  
Sometimes you get what you pay for. I do like Woodman's though.

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debentureboy said:   You are a COW! You don't go to grocery stores! WE go to grocery stores to buy YOU!
First, how DARE you?!  Second, what do you call THIS?? 

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qcumber98 said:   
debentureboy said:   You are a COW! You don't go to grocery stores! WE go to grocery stores to buy YOU!
First, how DARE you?!  Second, what do you call THIS??

  Maybe that's like the seafood places where you can pick the lobster you want?  Instead, you can pick which cow to turn into steaks?

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dcwilbur said:   This would have been a better list.  Same survey, much better information.

Consumer Reports: Where to Find the Best Grocery Store Prices in America

  
And no autoplay video

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This is the worst "article" I've ever clicked.

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jerosen said:   What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."

I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

  
Agreed.  Cost is a really important factor.  But there are others as well.

I was struck in that the nominally "low cost" provider, WalMart, rated so poorly.  Yet this is entirely consistent with my own experience, and I take no issue whatsoever with the survey where WalMart is concerned.  I find WalMart food offerings to be relatively high in cost and the quality too often is not there.  WalMart garners very little of our food shopping business.

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I've been to Publix while on vacation before and didn't think it was anything special. The Martin's right outside my neighborhood just closed and is being renovated into a Publix. I didn't really care, but after seeing this, maybe I'll be pleasantly surprised.

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shinobi1 said:   
jerosen said:   What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."

I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

  
Agreed.  Cost is a really important factor.  But there are others as well.

I was struck in that the nominally "low cost" provider, WalMart, rated so poorly.  Yet this is entirely consistent with my own experience, and I take no issue whatsoever with the survey where WalMart is concerned.  I find WalMart food offerings to be relatively high in cost and the quality too often is not there.  WalMart garners very little of our food shopping business.

  I find the opposite - most loathing of Walmart's products is due to the name on the receipt.  There's certain products that are always better to get at one retailer than another, but there is no consistent bias for or against any particular retailer.  I'll bet that in a blind comparison of a broad spectrum of products, Walmart items will hold their own as well as any chain as far as quality and price/value.

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Glitch99 said:   
shinobi1 said:   
jerosen said:   What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."

I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

  
Agreed.  Cost is a really important factor.  But there are others as well.

I was struck in that the nominally "low cost" provider, WalMart, rated so poorly.  Yet this is entirely consistent with my own experience, and I take no issue whatsoever with the survey where WalMart is concerned.  I find WalMart food offerings to be relatively high in cost and the quality too often is not there.  WalMart garners very little of our food shopping business.

  I find the opposite - most loathing of Walmart's products is due to the name on the receipt.  There's certain products that are always better to get at one retailer than another, but there is no consistent bias for or against any particular retailer.  I'll bet that in a blind comparison of a broad spectrum of products, Walmart items will hold their own as well as any chain as far as quality and price/value.

  
A very fair comment, I think.  Regardless my own relatively poor experience with food shopping at WalMart, there could be other reasons Consumer Reports rated them last and, in addition, ordered the list so WalMart's poor showing would be at the top of the list, thereby highlighting it.  I'll not go into specifics as to what those reasons might be, but I have my suspicions. 

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Glitch99 said:   
shinobi1 said:   
jerosen said:   What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."

I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

  
Agreed.  Cost is a really important factor.  But there are others as well.

I was struck in that the nominally "low cost" provider, WalMart, rated so poorly.  Yet this is entirely consistent with my own experience, and I take no issue whatsoever with the survey where WalMart is concerned.  I find WalMart food offerings to be relatively high in cost and the quality too often is not there.  WalMart garners very little of our food shopping business.

  I find the opposite - most loathing of Walmart's products is due to the name on the receipt.  There's certain products that are always better to get at one retailer than another, but there is no consistent bias for or against any particular retailer.  I'll bet that in a blind comparison of a broad spectrum of products, Walmart items will hold their own as well as any chain as far as quality and price/value.

It really depends on each individual's definition of "quality" as well.  I feed a big family, and let me tell you, pasta, frozen meatballs, chicken, jar and canned goods, packaged foods, lunch meats, etc., from Walmart or Costco are just as good for feeding my gang as anything from Whole Foods or anything in between.  We shop almost solely on the basis of price.   

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Sometimes CR is way out in left field. In this case they are way out in the corn field.

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This list is about how much people like the chain, and nothing else.

People really love Publix and Wegmans -- but neither typically has the best prices. Though, as an occasional Wegmans shopper, I can tell you that Wegmans does have fairly good everyday low prices on certain Staples -- though on some items they can have costs higher than Whole Foods.

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shinobi1 said:   ...
  
A very fair comment, I think.  Regardless my own relatively poor experience with food shopping at WalMart, there could be other reasons Consumer Reports rated them last and, in addition, ordered the list so WalMart's poor showing would be at the top of the list, thereby highlighting it.  I'll not go into specifics as to what those reasons might be, but I have my suspicions. 



Consumer reports did not order the list that way. It was the TV station that wrote that article using CR data.

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Whats all this publix wegmans kroger discussion? If it doesnt exist in CA, its small potatoes.

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dcwilbur said:   
I feed a big family, and let me tell you, pasta, frozen meatballs, chicken, jar and canned goods, packaged foods, lunch meats, etc., from Walmart or Costco are just as good for feeding my gang as anything from Whole Foods or anything in between

  If you're not buying fresh produce or unprocessed meats, you're not going to notice a difference.

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calcalastic said:   Whats all this publix wegmans kroger discussion? If it doesnt exist in CA, its small potatoes.
  kroger is the biggest supermarket
 It is the United States 's largest supermarket chain by revenue ($115.34 billion for fiscal year 2016),[l=[4]][/l]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kroger#cite_note-stores.org-4 the second-largest general retailer (behind Walmart )[l=[4]][/l]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kroger#cite_note-stores.org-4 and the twenty-third largest company in the United States.[l=[5]][/l]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kroger#cite_note-5 Kroger is also the third-largest retailer in the world. [l=[6]][/l]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kroger#cite_note-6 

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calcalastic said:   Whats all this publix wegmans kroger discussion? If it doesnt exist in CA, its small potatoes.
  Publix is based in Florida and has stores throughout the Southeast. Wegmans is based in New York and has stores throughout the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

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dcwilbur said:   
Glitch99 said:   
shinobi1 said:   
jerosen said:   What are they measuring exactly? The linked article has little detail on the ranking other than its a measure of "best to worst" and "Consumer Reports said a score of 100 would mean customers were completely satisfied with their experience."

I'm thinking costs must play a factor.

  
Agreed.  Cost is a really important factor.  But there are others as well.

I was struck in that the nominally "low cost" provider, WalMart, rated so poorly.  Yet this is entirely consistent with my own experience, and I take no issue whatsoever with the survey where WalMart is concerned.  I find WalMart food offerings to be relatively high in cost and the quality too often is not there.  WalMart garners very little of our food shopping business.

  I find the opposite - most loathing of Walmart's products is due to the name on the receipt.  There's certain products that are always better to get at one retailer than another, but there is no consistent bias for or against any particular retailer.  I'll bet that in a blind comparison of a broad spectrum of products, Walmart items will hold their own as well as any chain as far as quality and price/value.

It really depends on each individual's definition of "quality" as well.  I feed a big family, and let me tell you, pasta, frozen meatballs, chicken, jar and canned goods, packaged foods, lunch meats, etc., from Walmart or Costco are just as good for feeding my gang as anything from Whole Foods or anything in between.  We shop almost solely on the basis of price.   

  
You must have a great and unusual Walmart. Sure a can of Bush's beans is a can of Bush's beans, but something like chickens have a huge variation in quality. Just dismembering a Walmart chicken you can tell what a cheaply raised chicken it is, grainy coarse flesh, and they taste accordingly. Bleugh.

Food I routinely buy from Walmart - raw tortillas, and sushi rice ($5 at my local supermarket, $2 at Walmart).

eta: oh and frozen cheese curds!

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ganda said:   You must have a great and unusual Walmart. Sure a can of Bush's beans is a can of Bush's beans, but something like chickens have a huge variation in quality. Just dismembering a Walmart chicken you can tell what a cheaply raised chicken it is, grainy coarse flesh, and they taste accordingly. Bleugh.

I was speaking more of the "nugget" variety.

We actually don't shop at Walmart very often, simply because there isn't one near us. Our everyday grocery store is actually Costco which has great meat at great prices. For in-season produce, the local (cheap) grocery store is best, but for year-round consistency, Costco is also number one in fresh produce in my book.  

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shinobi1 said:   People need food in order to survive.  Thus, food is a principal cost center for most individuals and families.  

 

  
While food is needed to survive, that alone does not make it a principal cost center.  

The amount of food needed to survive is a fraction of 1% of the budget for most people in the US.  (I.e. Rice and beans)  Most of us choose to spend much more than that because we can.  - Often times it can taste better, (or) be healthier, or other desirable accompaniments the more you spend on it. 

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dcwilbur said:   
ganda said:   You must have a great and unusual Walmart. Sure a can of Bush's beans is a can of Bush's beans, but something like chickens have a huge variation in quality. Just dismembering a Walmart chicken you can tell what a cheaply raised chicken it is, grainy coarse flesh, and they taste accordingly. Bleugh.

 

I was speaking more of the "nugget" variety.

We actually don't shop at Walmart very often, simply because there isn't one near us. Our everyday grocery store is actually Costco which has great meat at great prices. For in-season produce, the local (cheap) grocery store is best, but for year-round consistency, Costco is also number one in fresh produce in my book.  

  why do you buy nuggets when costco has the rotisserie?

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videogamesaremylife said:   shinobi1 said:   People need food in order to survive.  Thus, food is a principal cost center for most individuals and families.  

 

  
While food is needed to survive, that alone does not make it a principal cost center.  

The amount of food needed to survive is a fraction of 1% of the budget for most people in the US.  (I.e. Rice and beans)  Most of us choose to spend much more than that because we can.  - Often times it can taste better, (or) be healthier, or other desirable accompaniments the more you spend on it. 


Meat is overrated and its bad for the earth. Eat more veggies and you'll be healthier, feel better, and save money.

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meatmeat47 said:   

Meat is overrated and its bad for the earth. Eat more veggies and you'll be healthier, feel better, and save money.


Wrong on all three counts.
 
Human intestine is designed as a primary protein consumer.  

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If God didn't want us to eat the animals, he wouldn't have made them out of meat.

Skipping 32 Messages...
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shinobi1 said:   Another facet/driver of massive buying is if you catch a package size reduction in progress.  I know this thread is about food.  But this happened to me with bath soap.  I caught 'em just as they were reducing the weight of each bar of soap by 10%.  Bought out every heavier bar I could find where they were still on the shelf . . . several different stores.

Then, long thereafter when I finally ran out of that soap and needed more, it happened AGAIN!  They were reducing the weight of the bars of soap (same brand) AGAIN!!  So I did the same thing all over one more time!  I hate when they pull this crap.

I mean, that was bath soap.  But they pull the same stunt with food items, too.  Most annoying for me is when I fail to notice.

 



It is even more than a company downsizing, manufacturers will create different products for a chain, I worked in grocery and know things like sandwich bags would be differently packaged for Costco/WinDix cuz I would see some of the labeling.  

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