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Three years ago we received some hail damage to our at the time one year old home.  I asked the builder to have his crew inspect the roof and he verbally indicated to me that he did not feel the roof needed to be replaced.  In light of this information I carried out some repair work on my own.  There were some dents in the gutters on the home which I also chose to leave in place as they are cosmetic and not functional damage.  At the time of this event I had no plans on selling the home so my thinking was I would keep an eye on the roof and if it became an issue would then pay for a tear down and re-roof.  I wanted to avoid paying my deductible and possibly enduring a rate increase.  Many of my neighbors filed claims and had theirs replaced.

Things have changed now and I am looking to place the property on the market next year.  I have inspected the roof twice yearly and so far the repairs have held up well.  In my opinion there is nothing wrong with the roof other than it has lost some of its useful life span.  I have no problem negotiating my asking price down somewhat because of this situation.  The roof is not leaking and is in no imminent danger of failure.

Now all of that said this will come up on an inspection.  Is this something that an appraiser is likely to disqualify the home for?

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rated:
Disqualification sounds unlikely. That's never really a decision an appraiser makes - their worst would be advising that the roof is not functional and requires immediate repair or replacement. A lender might consider that a disqualifying condition, but might still allow the seller to address it.

It sounds like your roof is fine, and the appraiser would most likely confirm that and provide an estimate on how much more useful life can be expected from it.

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ohoffman said:   Now all of that said this will come up on an inspection.  Is this something that an appraiser is likely to disqualify the home for?
  Home appraiser isn't a home inspector. Probably won't even come out to look at the now only 4 year old house, let alone inspect the roof. 

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ohoffman said:   Is this something that an appraiser is likely to disqualify the home for?
You mean "inspector," right?  Not appraiser?  Appraisers determine value, while inspectors identify conditions within the home that may cause concern or need repair.  I realize practices and terms differ from region to region, but I've never heard of an inspector "disqualifying" a home.  Now a lender might not want to offer financing on a home with significant deficiencies, but if that arises, you just enter into negotiation with the buyer to address it, either with a mutually agreed upon price concession, or you repair it prior to closing, or funds are put in escrow for the repair, etc.  Just like any other issue that comes up during the inspection process. 

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Appraiser won't be checking the roof.

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It was a RE agent who told me that not putting a new roof on the house and leaving the gutters as-is might be a disqualification on the appraisal. And that a bank may refuse to loan. This was the source of my concern here.

Does the appraiser not look into this sort of thing? Or check the home inspection report?

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ohoffman said:   It was a RE agent who told me that not putting a new roof on the house and leaving the gutters as-is might be a disqualification on the appraisal. 
  Well duh! RE agent wants to do anything to increase the chance of a quicker sale and a new roof and gutters would help.

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Not to mention would increase the sales price and increase their profit from the sale. That had occurred to me as well.

I have a 2000 square foot split level with an unfinished basement. I was strongly encouraged by the RE agent to get the basement finished too. She was making it sound like with only two finished bedrooms we would have a heck of a time getting it sold. So this was another thing she was telling us. Thing is finishing that is a lot of work and I'm not real inclined. And if I pay for it there is no guarantee that I will recover those costs in the sale. I have been told by other people that if you go to sell unless there are functional issues in the home you usually are best off just negotiating the price down. IE: I don't expect to get the same amount vs. a house with a finished basement.

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Sounds like you need to find a new RE agent ... one that works for you, not themself (if such a thing even exists).

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It's possible that the RE agent was referring to a FHA buyer.  When I sold my home to a buyer with a FHA mortgage, the FHA appraiser needed to ensure that there was at least two year's of useful life remaining on the roof.  

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Only appraiser that "might" matter would be a FHA appraiser. They are supposed to do an inspection....though it's often pretty half effort.

I wouldn't worry about it. See what the buyers come up with on their inspection response, and negotiate from there.

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Thank you all.

I may pay out of pocket to fix the gutters myself because that is more noticeable to the eye when prospective buyers view the property and is a much cheaper repair than a new roof. Is the fact the roof was repaired and has lost some useful life span something I should disclose on a buy/sell? What about to their inspector?

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The appraiser will check the roof but it is usually limited to the appraiser looking at the roof from the ground. If it is obviously in poor shape (e.g. missing or curling shingles), the appraiser may note that the roof may not have three/two years of remaining economic life. In which case, the lender is likely to require a roof inspection or replacement of the roof. If your repairs were sufficient and the roof does not look bad, you should be fine. For an FHA or VA loan, the appraiser looks a little more closely at the roof. For FHA, the appraiser is supposed to inspect the attic to check for any obvious leakage.

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IF you are as concerned as your post sounds, get your own written roof and/or gutter inspection. IF it passes, you can show that around to prospective buyers, appraiser, lenders, etc.

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ohoffman said:   Thank you all.

I may pay out of pocket to fix the gutters myself because that is more noticeable to the eye when prospective buyers view the property and is a much cheaper repair than a new roof. Is the fact the roof was repaired and has lost some useful life span something I should disclose on a buy/sell? What about to their inspector?

  
In my experience the FHA inspectors are very picky and a giant PIA.  Sold my home and buyer had FHA.  Among the things FHA required before sign off was peeling paint on a metal railing on a small townhouse porch.  So yeah I imagine a hail damaged roof would not get past them. 

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Woodchuck312 said:   ohoffman said:   Thank you all.

I may pay out of pocket to fix the gutters myself because that is more noticeable to the eye when prospective buyers view the property and is a much cheaper repair than a new roof. Is the fact the roof was repaired and has lost some useful life span something I should disclose on a buy/sell? What about to their inspector?

  
In my experience the FHA inspectors are very picky and a giant PIA.  Sold my home and buyer had FHA.  Among the things FHA required before sign off was peeling paint on a metal railing on a small townhouse porch.  So yeah I imagine a hail damaged roof would not get past them. 



They nitpick on things like peeling paint, but IMO they are usually too lazy to ever actually get up on the roof.

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ohoffman said:   .

I have a 2000 square foot split level with an unfinished basement. I was strongly encouraged by the RE agent to get the basement finished too. She was making it sound like with only two finished bedrooms we would have a heck of a time getting it sold. .



2000 square foot house with only 2 bedrooms?

Yeah that might be harder to sell. If people only need 2 bedrooms then they usually don't need a lot of house.

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If the roof was repaired but not replaced should I be putting it in the disclosure statement on the buy/sell? The FHA appraiser doesn't have to get up on the roof to learn about the damage and repairs made if I have to disclose this.

House is only 3 years old we didn't finish the basement. Unless the buyer pays for the basement the builder usually won't finish it out. There is a house up the street same builder just like this one won't have a finished basement, yard, or fence unless the buyer pays to have it done which increases the price. I agree it will be harder to sell without a finished basement which is going to require us to price it appropriately. We landscaped the front yard ourselves and put a vinyl fence in on the back yard.

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