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rated:
Hello, I am here to evaluate my current situation and some ideas to strategically plan things.

Age: 34
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Education: Masters in Computer Eng (2005)- gets irrelevant now!
Income: $99,500, no bonous, no stocks/options its a large non-profit. Will have a 3% raise in next 18 months, nothing after that.
Benefits: no match to 401k, 20 days PTO, defined benefit plan - kicks in at 62,
Employer paid health ins for only employee for now. Can change anytime. Already heard management is exploring taking this benefit away. No health ins in retirement plan.

Current Employer: 9 yrs, same job title, no upward mobility in forseeable future.
Job: IT, work on ERP data, data modelling, analytics, dw, data viz etc, know data models of many ERP's and apps.
Function as a solutions architect, but title&pay is just analyst.
Work Environment: Work is easy for me, but the office politics and stupid management is stressful.
AFAIK, decent job stability currently.
Similar jobs locally pay similar with a lesser stability, not sure if I should take those opportunities.
Extra Income: About $15k/year some local consulting - not long term though.

Career Goals:
I wish to be a IT manager / CIO / Director etc, but I am sort of getting stangnant now.
Make good money - in the top 3% lets say for a considerable time and retire by 65.

Questions:
1. Is my compensation below market?
2. What is the market range for my situation (13-15 yrs exp)
3. Should I switch jobs to private sector to make more money and career advancement?
4. Being in the same job title for 9+yrs will this hurt me when looking for jobs
5. I do have concerns about IT outsourcing that's prevant in private companies - how much should I be worried about it.

Any general advice to improve my situation, knowing the cloud changing the times in IT?





 

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When a public sector option exists for your field, the choice is usually the same no matter what.

Choose public if you v... (more)

VicVinegar (Jul. 02, 2017 @ 2:21p) |

You need to change your mindset relative to this.  You need to be ready to partially-to-significantly "re-tool" every 3-... (more)

Dus10 (Jul. 03, 2017 @ 6:49a) |

In your place, I would listen to the advice of experienced users of the forum. Your situation is really beautiful, belie... (more)

casarstca (Jul. 14, 2017 @ 1:23p) |

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rated:
markroger said:   

Career Goals:
I wish to be a IT manager / CIO / Director etc, but I am sort of getting stangnant now.
Make good money - in the top 3% lets say for a considerable time and retire by 65.


 

  

Why and why?


How good is your pension?     You get free health insurance and a pension.  Those benefits are worth a lot.   

Your pay seems in the right ballpark for Phoenix computer jobs : 
https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes_38060.htm#15-0000
 

rated:
Q: How stable is your job?

1) Depends on location, in AZ the Avg IT level job pays out 75k so you are ahead.
2) Depends on Skills, I don't know your full skill set
3) WTF you are in the public sector? Doesn't that mean job for life with nice Benefits? I would stay there.
4) No, finding a job when you are OLD is tough.
5) Not really, those guys will never even consider hiring you in the first place.

I would recommend you continue contracting, having a Government job means you have lots of 'spare' time. Working Private company usually means lots of stress.

Beware of recruiters. Some out there like C*****s are just resume farms that really don't have jobs, but will pretend to have thousands of listings.

My thoughts only
Working Public sector, work a nice job that does sometimes have stress, and having no advancement unless Nepotism.  Your job is guaranteed as long as you toe the line.

Working Private sector, work a nice job with high stress and the more you make the more likely you are replaced by someone who is cheaper.  Also if your owner might have 'incidents' where they lose their mind and their company.

rated:
Pension plans are huge but only if you are sticking it all the way out until you retire..

rated:
Luniz97 said:   Pension plans are huge but only if you are sticking it all the way out until you retire..
  Having subsidized health insurance for life is a much bigger benefit than a pension IMHO. Healthcare costs can eat at all of your retirement money.

rated:
MR1857 said:   Career Goals:
I wish to be a IT manager / CIO / Director etc, but I am sort of getting stangnant now.
Make good money - in the top 3% lets say for a considerable time and retire by 65.



 

  But before that you also said "office politics and stupid management is stressful." I don't think they will get any less stressful as you go up the ladder.

rated:
avalon6 said:   Luniz97 said:   Pension plans are huge but only if you are sticking it all the way out until you retire..
  Having subsidized health insurance for life is a much bigger benefit than a pension IMHO. Healthcare costs can eat at all of your retirement money.

Oh! Let me be clear:
Employer paid health for just employee for now. Can change anytime. Already heard management is exploring taking this benefit away.

Retirement:
No health insurance, we gotta figure out ourselves or go medicare. Pension plan insurance is too expensive that no retirees (now) use it.

rated:
...

rated:
Just a FYI. Most employers don't offer health insurance in retirement anymore. Some will offer you a lump sum to help cover cost, but have gotten out of the healthcare game as much as possible since its such an un-measurable future liability.

rated:
You may have better responses at MrMoneyMustache forum.

rated:
daw4888 said:   Just a FYI. Most employers don't offer health insurance in retirement anymore. Some will offer you a lump sum to help cover cost, but have gotten out of the healthcare game as much as possible since its such an un-measurable future liability.
Absolutely know that. I had to explicitly say that as one reponse assumed that my employer might offer health ins in retirement for free.

Its a great fact that its at least free for the time being.

rated:
IMO,

you are in completely different career trajectory if you want to be in leadership position. It doesn't even sound like you got the drive for it. Which, in itself, is not a bad or good thing except the fact you also express the interest to move up the management ladder. Make me question what you really want.

People wouldn't consider you for management, maybe a team-leader, then you have to show desire and drive to move up the ladder which comes with risk.

rated:
You should feel very lucky for that salary in Arizona. That's equivalent to 200k in the Bay Area.

rated:
MR1857 said:   
daw4888 said:   Just a FYI. Most employers don't offer health insurance in retirement anymore. Some will offer you a lump sum to help cover cost, but have gotten out of the healthcare game as much as possible since its such an un-measurable future liability.
Absolutely know that. I had to explicitly say that as one reponse assumed that my employer might offer health ins in retirement for free.

Its a great fact that its at least free for the time being.

  He did not say or assume retirement health insurance for free.  He said subsidized, which is some sort of retiree/employer split.   I am in a public sector job and we have subsidized health care once we retire and have enough years on the job and age to qualify.  I will actually have to work a few more years longer than I originally thought I would to qualify for it over basic retirement/pension, but it will be worth is since they will subsidize mine by paying 80% of the premium (same as active employees). 

rated:
I wouldn't ever be content... so suggesting that someone is "ahead" means very little. You've been at your job for 9 years, which is an eternity for IT. You have probably missed out already on raises, bonuses, and 401k matching, plus others. I would just get into a mode that you seem to not be accustomed: always be open and searching for new opportunities. You'll never find the right fit if you're not looking. Don't jump at just anything, but also don't be afraid to talk with someone if it doesn't look perfect... you don't have to accept a job offer if it is tendered.

rated:
Dus10 said:   I wouldn't ever be content... so suggesting that someone is "ahead" means very little. You've been at your job for 9 years, which is an eternity for IT. You have probably missed out already on raises, bonuses, and 401k matching, plus others. I would just get into a mode that you seem to not be accustomed: always be open and searching for new opportunities. You'll never find the right fit if you're not looking. Don't jump at just anything, but also don't be afraid to talk with someone if it doesn't look perfect... you don't have to accept a job offer if it is tendered.
  Lol you sound like a Job Recruiter.

rated:
ZenNUTS said:   IMO,

you are in completely different career trajectory if you want to be in leadership position. It doesn't even sound like you got the drive for it. Which, in itself, is not a bad or good thing except the fact you also express the interest to move up the management ladder. Make me question what you really want.

People wouldn't consider you for management, maybe a team-leader, then you have to show desire and drive to move up the ladder which comes with risk.

  I do have that feeling that my trajectory is different!

3-4 years ago, people (boss/co-workers) told me, I am too young to look for management positions, now they are saying, my trajectory is different and I might have missed the boat. I am 34 and I feel, I might have time left to transition to management / better paying jobs etc, I could be wrong though.
Most managers in my org are in late 40s, 50s and most were rescued from the rut through their favoring bosses. In my org, even a low level IT support center rep can be promoted to IT manager overnight. They give some lame reasons how great that person is! Its all about who they like than skills etc.

Should I look into solutions architect jobs (that aid sales teams / pre-sales etc) in big companies like Microsoft / Salesforce / Oracle / Workday / Other top tech companies? What would be career progressions in that line? I believe they make about $140k+. I work with a lot of them as a client, so I kind of understand what they do.

I do want to see myself sitting in rut, when all my friends (outside of work) are all directors and managers and CIO's etc in 10 yrs...that's my fear.
 

rated:
As said earlier, you are in the 'GIGOTOS' (Grass is greener on the other side) situation.
That guy who was hired and promoted overnight. I bet it was nepotism. (The 'lame' reasons help reinforce that)

If he wasn't promoted via Nepotism, then you better watch your back, because it means they don't like you.

Once you go to the private sector, you will find out it's a dog eat dog world out there.  And in private sector, if they don't like you , you get fired for the 'lamest' reasons.

rated:
MR1857 said:   
ZenNUTS said:   IMO,

you are in completely different career trajectory if you want to be in leadership position. It doesn't even sound like you got the drive for it. Which, in itself, is not a bad or good thing except the fact you also express the interest to move up the management ladder. Make me question what you really want.

People wouldn't consider you for management, maybe a team-leader, then you have to show desire and drive to move up the ladder which comes with risk.

  I do have that feeling that my trajectory is different!

3-4 years ago, people (boss/co-workers) told me, I am too young to look for management positions, now they are saying, my trajectory is different and I might have missed the boat. I am 34 and I feel, I might have time left to transition to management / better paying jobs etc, I could be wrong though.
Most managers in my org are in late 40s, 50s and most were rescued from the rut through their favoring bosses. In my org, even a low level IT support center rep can be promoted to IT manager overnight. They give some lame reasons how great that person is! Its all about who they like than skills etc.

Should I look into solutions architect jobs (that aid sales teams / pre-sales etc) in big companies like Microsoft / Salesforce / Oracle / Workday / Other top tech companies? What would be career progressions in that line? I believe they make about $140k+. I work with a lot of them as a client, so I kind of understand what they do.

I do want to see myself sitting in rut, when all my friends (outside of work) are all directors and managers and CIO's etc in 10 yrs...that's my fear.

  
Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.

rated:

Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.


oops... my success metrics in the sense? Can you please explain....

I am good at what I do... from what my employer tells me...

rated:
MR1857 said:   
Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.


oops... my success metrics in the sense? Can you please explain....

I am good at what I do... from what my employer tells me...


$$$$. That yardstick only works for salespeople and crooked politicians

rated:
SummerSoFar said:   MR1857 said:   
Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.


oops... my success metrics in the sense? Can you please explain....

I am good at what I do... from what my employer tells me...


$$$$. That yardstick only works for salespeople and crooked politicians


Cool. Thanks for letting me know that I cannot become an IT manager in private sector as my success metric is probably not up to par. Your input helps a lot.
Do you have any ideas how I can progress my career with this success metric?

rated:
SummerSoFar said:   MR1857 said:   SummerSoFar said:   MR1857 said:   
Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.


oops... my success metrics in the sense? Can you please explain....

I am good at what I do... from what my employer tells me...


$$$$. That yardstick only works for salespeople and crooked politicians


Cool. Thanks for letting me know that I cannot become an IT manager in private sector as my success metric is probably not up to par. Your input helps a lot.
Do you have any ideas how I can progress my career with this success metric?


R u for real? Just go cook meth or something.


Not sure how I am supposed to take this.

I will look forward for other people to chip in.

rated:
MR1857 said:   
SummerSoFar said:   
MR1857 said:   
SummerSoFar said:   
MR1857 said:   

Ur not gonna be a IT manager in private sector for long given your current success metrics. My guess that you just hate what you do and as a result feel like you are underpaid. Movin' on up ain't going to fix that.


oops... my success metrics in the sense? Can you please explain....

I am good at what I do... from what my employer tells me...


$$$$. That yardstick only works for salespeople and crooked politicians


Cool. Thanks for letting me know that I cannot become an IT manager in private sector as my success metric is probably not up to par. Your input helps a lot.
Do you have any ideas how I can progress my career with this success metric?


R u for real? Just go cook meth or something.


Not sure how I am supposed to take this.

I will look forward for other people to chip in.

  
It's really quite simple dude. If you get into management for any reason other than you like enabling success of others and to help drive corporate initiatives you will not succeed and it will be a short and painful endeavor. Your direct reports will hate you and you will hate your direct reports. 

As already mentioned this is a completely different career path, and by your comments you are quite possibly not ready for it.

rated:
Say in 10-15 yrs, will IT/data analytics jobs (not cs/sw eng.) still exist in decent numbers for people here in USA after inspite of cloud and large outsourcing thats taking place?

rated:
Of course there will be....but most likely you will have to either know Russian or Chinese

rated:
bigdinkel said:   You should feel very lucky for that salary in Arizona. That's equivalent to 200k in the Bay Area.

Rather earn 200k in the bay area. Always easier to spend less than earn more.

rated:
When a public sector option exists for your field, the choice is usually the same no matter what.

Choose public if you value security over being able to "max out" your potential value. Yes you can usually earn more in private, but the workplace isn't any friendlier and it's largely a race to the bottom when it comes to benefits, especially anything related to retirement.

Maybe you don't care because you'll make more? Maybe you get lucky and find a company that still takes care of it's employees. But don't assume it will be better than public or last very long if it is.

All in all, I think I'd be pretty happy with a government job making a healthy salary compared to the cost or living, but I don't work in that field.

rated:
MR1857 said:   Say in 10-15 yrs, will IT/data analytics jobs (not cs/sw eng.) still exist in decent numbers for people here in USA after inspite of cloud and large outsourcing thats taking place?
  You need to change your mindset relative to this.  You need to be ready to partially-to-significantly "re-tool" every 3-5 years.  You're not going to be able to find "one thing" that you just get up and punch the clock and put the widget in a box.  So, figure out how many cycles of that you can handle.

rated:
In your place, I would listen to the advice of experienced users of the forum. Your situation is really beautiful, believe me, you just do not understand how well you live. Well, so live and enjoy life further, stop fooling yourself with nonsense.

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