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[UPDATE] My Obamacare plan is being closed; most ins cos have pulled out of my state for '18; I may have to move states

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This is an UPDATE on my personal situation, related to a previous thread I started back in January (which was archived last month): 
https://www.fatwallet.com/forums/finance/1538314 -- "What realistically might happen to Obamacare at the end of January?  Or, say, in the first quarter of 2017?  In the first half of 2017?  In the whole of 2017?"

Last week, all but one of the O-care insurers in my county, including my own insurer of the past 4 years, announced that they are pulling out of my state, so they will not be offering O-care plans here in 2018.

My insurance company sent me an email to inform me that my plan was ending.  They apologized and explained that the extreme uncertainty about the near-term future of the nation-wide insurance program left them no choice but to cancel their participation entirely in some states, including mine.

The one potential O-care insurer in my county, which has not yet pulled out of my county for 2018 but which is still in negotiations with the state about what they might offer (meaning that their participation here is not set in stone), was a new entrant last year and is a small company, with a small footprint and a limited list of doctors and facilities (none of my existing doctors or facilities is covered by their plan).
In my county, it's already been hard to find doctors that are taking new patients, and there is a dearth of facilities and specialists - due to the terrible local economy and the out-of-the-way nature of the place. Even in the best-case scenario, thousands of people living here will be losing their past coverage and their past doctors, and in the first quarter of 2018 will be competing to get on the patient lists of a small number of local doctors.
Plus, I have needed surgeries in recent years and I might well again, and I would not want to have surgery in my county's single, small hospital (which is the only hospital that is covered by the only remaining O-care insurer in my county) unless that were unavoidable.

At least my county might end up with one O-care insurer in 2018; a number of counties in my state already know that they will have zero O-care insurers for 2018 -- I realize this will be the case in many counties around the country, too.

Until Congress decides the actual fate of O-care (or whatever might come after it), one can't clearly know what one's options might be.

It would not be easy or affordable for me to move to another county or even another state in the near term, but I might have to.

Has anyone else here had their existing O-care plan cancelled for the 2018 calendar year, and seemingly been left without much of a - or without any - affordable alternative?
Is anyone thinking that relocating soon to another area of the country might be required, for their/their family's health's sake?

I saw in the news last week that one of the options that is still being considered by Congress is to cancel O-care completely in the short term, then maybe try to figure out a sort of replacement for it later.
If they simply cancelled/repealed O-care in the next few months, does anyone know if that would go into effect immediately, or at the end of 2017, or at the end of 2018?

Note: I am not trying to be "political" -- my concerns here are about my healthcare, my finances, my family members whom I currently help take care of and who would not be able to move from the area, my options, my future.  After the news broke last week that almost every O-care insurer decided to pull out of my state, I would have updated my original thread about my personal situation, if I could have.

Moderator Comment: This thread had been placed under moderation to keep thread on topic. — Jul. 6, 2017 @ 3:46pm
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1) What state?
I ask this because I heard that Ohio had a major opioid abuse and this affects ACA coverage.

2) If they do repeal, it will most likely take effect at the end of the year.

3) If they do repeal, it means we go back to ins companies cherry picking who to insure (So if you have a preexisting, you are SOL)

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Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.

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There are many companies selling policies off of the exchange without subsidies. Or get a job with a company that provides employee coverage.

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brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  How convenient you ignore the fact that those silly promised risk corridor funds were never delivered by the Rupubs. And they have been actively destabilizing the ACA since inception.

Let me correct this for you: Obamacare can't work in any state where folks don't care about others. Edit: Like the lonestar state. Guns and oil. Yeehaw.

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SummerSoFar said:   
brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  How convenient you ignore the fact that those silly promised risk corridor funds were never delivered by the Rupubs. And they have been actively destabilizing the ACA since inception.

Let me correct this for you: Obamacare can't work in any state where folks don't care about others. Edit: Like the lonestar state. Guns and oil. Yeehaw.

  The ACA was written so the risk corridor funds would expire in 2016.  This was signed for by Obama and passed entirely by Democrats back in 2009. The decision to write the 2016 expiration date was entirely in the hands of Democrats when they wrote the bill.

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lonestarguy said:   
SummerSoFar said:   
brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  How convenient you ignore the fact that those silly promised risk corridor funds were never delivered by the Rupubs. And they have been actively destabilizing the ACA since inception.

Let me correct this for you: Obamacare can't work in any state where folks don't care about others. Edit: Like the lonestar state. Guns and oil. Yeehaw.

  The ACA was written so the risk corridor funds would expire in 2016.  This was signed for by Obama and passed entirely by Democrats back in 2009. The decision to write the 2016 expiration date was entirely in the hands of Democrats when they wrote the bill.

  Corridor funds were held back in FY 2015 and FY2016. Get your alternate facts straight. Edit: And also 2014 as it turns out. So R took control of congress and said 'f you' to the insurers.

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Corridor funds were not held back completely, instead they were made to be revenue neutral so that it was closer to true risk sharing - any insurers making a significant profit would share revenue with hose who are not. Obviously, the biggest problem was not enough healthy people wanted the ACA plans and sicker people signed up exactly as brettdoyle describes. I feel the best solution is send this back to the states. Some states like California are now considering single payer. Colorado rejected it. Travis County in Texas was providing care to those without insurance prior to ACA through local clinics and a property-tax funded healthcare district. Massachusetts had close to universal coverage that worked for them prior to ACA.

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lonestarguy said:   There are many companies selling policies off of the exchange without subsidies. Or get a job with a company that provides employee coverage.
  
It doesn't matter which group of fools are at fault for this (*), this is a problem that lots of people will have over the next few months.  It sucks to hear, but maybe the only answer is to do what we did before... go with a non-subsidized policy or find a job that offers insurance.

(*I personally blame myself and the other voters for continuing to vote these craptacular politicians back into office.)

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SummerSoFar said:     How convenient you ignore the fact that those silly promised risk corridor funds were never delivered by the Rupubs. 
  The undelivered risk corridors amounts would, at this point, represent a one time payment to the more incompetent / unlucky / under-priced insurers at the expense of the taxpayer and would make no difference in the economic viability of the ACA system for 2017 or going forward.  They were set to expire in 2016 so this year, 2017, was the first year where the premiums should reflect the true cost of insurance rather than one that had been arranged by the Democrats to be artificially cheaper to sell this wonderful bill of goods to the country on the back of additional and temporary taxpayer subsidies.  But they accomplished their mission - years later, the current politicians can't seem give up that 4% NII tax revenue and all the extra Medicaid money has states unwilling to give up an expensive, unsustainable system that does nothing to address the main healthcare issue (which is costs, not coverage).   

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oppidum said:   Has anyone else here had their existing O-care plan cancelled for the 2018 calendar year, and seemingly been left without much of a - or without any - affordable alternative?

Is anyone thinking that relocating soon to another area of the country might be required, for their/their family's health's sake?

If they simply cancelled/repealed O-care in the next few months, does anyone know if that would go into effect immediately, or at the end of 2017, or at the end of 2018?

  My plan for 2016 cut half their hospitals, including of course the better and more expensive ones, a similar amount of their doctor network, and raised the premiums 20-25% or so.  I switched to the last viable option in my area for 2017, which is an incredibly local plan offered by a local hospital and with no coverage on the far side of the city, let alone the rest of the state or nationwide.  Another 20-25% increase is in the works for 2018, which, between the premiums and super high deductibles, amounts to $30-35k out of pocket before any benefits of coverage at all (hardly "insurance" for most events, which require much less than this).  One more year like this and perhaps I will just self insure or try to get some medically underwritten catastrophic policy somehow.

I think getting a job (or a spouse with a job) that includes group health coverage is probably more feasible than moving, but I guess it depends on your personal situation.  Besides, at least then when the ACA providers pull out of where you moved to in another 1-2 years, at least you're still covered.  The ACA only wrecked the individual health insurance market here in the US; the large group market for company plans is still working fine so that's where you want to be if you can swing it.

at this point I expect ACA to continue basically as is for 2018 (but with entirely predicable premium increases and coverage decreases); maybe if the politicians get their act together they could offer a replacement for 2019.  The insurance companies have to submit rates and proposals around 6 months in advance, so 2018 is already in progress at this point under the current rules.  

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Do you work? What do you do for work? Could you try doing what you do (or something similar) for an employer that offers health insurance? Would you consider changing careers to get health insurance? Are you a Christian? Have you looked into Christian health sharing ministries?

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That sucks.

OP do you know where you will be moving to?

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The wedge is coming from above not below. 3 card monte on a life & death scale. Blaming those that are easy to hurt. Rather than those responsible puppet masters who are untouchable.

I am not naming or blaming anyone so this is not against FW tos.

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xerty said:   
oppidum said:   Has anyone else here had their existing O-care plan cancelled for the 2018 calendar year, and seemingly been left without much of a - or without any - affordable alternative?

Is anyone thinking that relocating soon to another area of the country might be required, for their/their family's health's sake?

If they simply cancelled/repealed O-care in the next few months, does anyone know if that would go into effect immediately, or at the end of 2017, or at the end of 2018?

  My plan for 2016 cut half their hospitals, including of course the better and more expensive ones, a similar amount of their doctor network, and raised the premiums 20-25% or so.  I switched to the last viable option in my area for 2017, which is an incredibly local plan offered by a local hospital and with no coverage on the far side of the city, let alone the rest of the state or nationwide.  Another 20-25% increase is in the works for 2018, which, between the premiums and super high deductibles, amounts to $30-35k out of pocket before any benefits of coverage at all (hardly "insurance" for most events, which require much less than this).  One more year like this and perhaps I will just self insure or try to get some medically underwritten catastrophic policy somehow.

I think getting a job (or a spouse with a job) that includes group health coverage is probably more feasible than moving, but I guess it depends on your personal situation.  Besides, at least then when the ACA providers pull out of where you moved to in another 1-2 years, at least you're still covered.  The ACA only wrecked the individual health insurance market here in the US; the large group market for company plans is still working fine so that's where you want to be if you can swing it.

at this point I expect ACA to continue basically as is for 2018 (but with entirely predicable premium increases and coverage decreases); maybe if the politicians get their act together they could offer a replacement for 2019.  The insurance companies have to submit rates and proposals around 6 months in advance, so 2018 is already in progress at this point under the current rules.  


>> unsustainable system that does nothing to address the main healthcare issue (which is costs, not coverage)

>> maybe if the politicians get their act together they could offer a replacement for 2019

I very much doubt things will be fixed by 2019.

You correctly mentioned that the issue is "costs". I believe most people recognize this now. However, there are a few more logical steps to be taken before a solution becomes apparent. 
Curbing costs will mean take-home money for insurance companies AND the healthcare providers (including doctors and pharmaceutical companies) will necessarily NEED to decrease. This is just a mathematical/accounting truth - no politics here.
The providers and insurance companies will NOT voluntarily agree to this.
Ergo, whatever is the solution will necessarily be against the will of the market participants on the sell side! i.e. not a "free market" solution.

Arriving at this logical conclusion will take a lot more pain and a lot longer than 2019.

As individuals, the most logical next step is to grab onto whatever group insurance you can have - the bigger the better!
This market is also going to go kaput in a matter of a few years due to healthcare inflation - but you can only hope that it lasts long enough to ride you through till the logical next steps sink in to the participants in the US political process. 
 

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I was too young to remember/care about health insurance pre ACA - so this is a genuine question.

What did people do for health insurance before ACA was enacted? Meaning - what kind of health insurance did OP have before ACA was enacted, giving him access to the insurance market place? I realize it's unfortunate to have constantly rising premiums and constantly decreasing availability for care, but ultimately isn't the entire lack of O-Care insurance providers in a state a return to the pre-Obama care era insurance environment?

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I do believe it is possible to help the OP with there issue, and not drag this conversation into a political debate.

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brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
False.

The recent report from the Congressional Budget Office documented that the ACA is not "collapsing", "exploding", "imploding", or in a "death spiral".

As to the private-sector health insurers in the ACA marketplace:

Health insurer Medica announced it will file with regulators to sell individual insurance statewide in Nebraska under the ACA. Additionally, health insurer Centene announced it will enter Kansas, Missouri and Nevada in 2018, while expanding its presence in Florida, Georgia, Indiana, Ohio, Texas and Washington. Oscar Health and Medica both announced they would join Centene in launching individual products in other states where other insurers have left public exchanges under the ACA.
 

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vnuts21 said:   I was too young to remember/care about health insurance pre ACA - so this is a genuine question.

What did people do for health insurance before ACA was enacted? Meaning - what kind of health insurance did OP have before ACA was enacted, giving him access to the insurance market place? I realize it's unfortunate to have constantly rising premiums and constantly decreasing availability for care, but ultimately isn't the entire lack of O-Care insurance providers in a state a return to the pre-Obama care era insurance environment?



No, because the new insurance regulations still exist. All insurance policies must be compliant with those mandatory coverages.

Before the ACA, it was kind of wild west, at least in many states. Insurers could write policies that covered or didn't cover whatever they wanted..and could also set limits on how much they would pay.

If you were young and healthy, this was a much better deal. If you were older/sicker it was not so good. If you had too many health issues, you were just denied policies entirely.

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SummerSoFar said:   
brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  How convenient you ignore the fact that those silly promised risk corridor funds were never delivered by the Rupubs. And they have been actively destabilizing the ACA since inception.

Let me correct this for you: Obamacare can't work in any state where folks don't care about others. Edit: Like the lonestar state. Guns and oil. Yeehaw.

  
(sorry, trying to stay politically neutral while explaining Texas politics is tough -- edited several times)

In the other topic I posted actual rates and the number of carriers available for some big cities, small cities, and a few REALLY Rural areas.  AHA was actually working in Texas for the most part.  Rates were a little higher than before AHA, but they were going up every year anyway.  Texas didn't have the extended Medicare, and has OTHER issues but the basics worked.  Texas has several state agencies that handle things like rehabilitative medicine as well.

(I refuse to call it Obamacare because all he did was sign the legislation -- President of the US doesn't make laws, he can just make it harder for them to pass)

Texas has a strong Republican party on a state level, but also a strong Democratic underpinning.  Of course a Texas Democrat is rarely particularly far to the left.  So on a national level they do one thing and on the local level in many places they do another.  Texas intentionally has a very dispersed political system, so it tends to be a bit less right than expected by outsiders on internal issues.

Texas does, as LSG noted, have county hospitals funded by taxes.  Smaller counties have clinics or partially fund hospitals in their country to provide basic medicine.  As a rule most Texans WANT there to be a basic medical system.  What gets them annoyed is when the poor get better insurance for "free" than people that have to pay for it can afford.  That may not be reality, but that is how many feel AHA worked out.  I don't know HOW many times I heard "they get Silver for free and I can't afford Bronze."  The basic idea is "clinic level services" and not "hospital level" should be what is free.  Except for emergencies -- get an appointment or "walk-in" during business hours.   When I was unemployed and uninsured 10 years back I used a local family clinic -- my bill $100 or so plus a cheap antibiotic script.  That clinic is still there, too.  

The local hospital system (Parkland) runs free/low-cost clinics specifically to keep people from abusing the Emergency Room.  Although with all the acute/standalone Emergency Rooms that are around that is less an issue now.  Most folks in Dallas soundly support those free clinics.  (they are built into schools and also serve the role a school "nurse" would as well as offering free immunizations to students)   Obviously poor counties are going to have less resources than Dallas County.  

The real issue for the OP is pre-existing conditions and the expectation of high future medical costs.  Other than a few minor issues I haven't seen a doctor in almost 30 years so I am probably not the best person to ask.  Of course I have paid a lot of premiums in that timeframe...  One of the major draws of my new agency was the fully paid benefits, especially as a contractor.  Quite decent Medical/Dental/Vision from UHC.   

Vnuts, you are too young to remember the bad side of the free market system.  Pre-existing conditions are either not covered or have huge waiting periods, as you get older your premiums skyrocket to the point that 50-65 premiums are crazy.  For lower paid workers they are essentially making so little after paying insurance they have no incentive not to retire and get free Medicare.  (that is WHY we have medicare -- think how bad premiums were for 75+ on a free market, literally only the rich lived to be older before it)    The AHA had to pay for that preexist coverage, so the premiums for the young and middle aged went up while the old folks mostly were flat.  They only stayed flat 55+ because they changed the multiple allowed between the top and bottom rates.  

It is always hard to take things away.  For those who couldn't get private insurance or had long term medical conditions (diabetes, asthma, ect) it was keep working and get group coverage, qualify for medicaid, accrue massive debt, or die.  For those people the premiums of AHA were not that bad at all. 

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Neilium said:   I do believe it is possible to help the OP with there issue, and not drag this conversation into a political debate.
A lot of the particulars of the OP's situation are ambiguous or not obvious (age, location, employment status, pre-existing conditions among others), but if s/he is self-employed, here are 10 Affordable Options to Buy Health Insurance When Self-Employed
If the OP does have to move, although Virginia did not expand Medicaid, there are a quite a few participants on the Obamacare exchange (at least in northern Virginia /  DC suburbs).

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Big giant miserable FAIL to everyone turning this into a political debate.

I apologize to the OP for not being able to provide answers. I have the same question about #3. If the ACA is repealed, do we go back to people not qualifying for insurance because of pre-existing conditions? Or, because, in theory, you would have had coverage until end of 2017, would you qualify as not having a pre-existing condition considering would you have had no lapse in coverage?

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vnuts21 said:   I was too young to remember/care about health insurance pre ACA - so this is a genuine question.

What did people do for health insurance before ACA was enacted? Meaning - what kind of health insurance did OP have before ACA was enacted, giving him access to the insurance market place? I realize it's unfortunate to have constantly rising premiums and constantly decreasing availability for care, but ultimately isn't the entire lack of O-Care insurance providers in a state a return to the pre-Obama care era insurance environment?

Insurers offered individual plans, but often with unfavorable and unpopular terms: lifetime maximums, non-coverage for certain services, application denials / non-coverage for preexisting conditions. And they weren't cheap, and weren't getting any cheaper. Insurers were happy to offer plans but, unsurprisingly, on terms favorable to them.

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rascott said:   
vnuts21 said:   I was too young to remember/care about health insurance pre ACA - so this is a genuine question.

What did people do for health insurance before ACA was enacted? Meaning - what kind of health insurance did OP have before ACA was enacted, giving him access to the insurance market place? I realize it's unfortunate to have constantly rising premiums and constantly decreasing availability for care, but ultimately isn't the entire lack of O-Care insurance providers in a state a return to the pre-Obama care era insurance environment?



No, because the new insurance regulations still exist. All insurance policies must be compliant with those mandatory coverages.

Before the ACA, it was kind of wild west, at least in many states. Insurers could write policies that covered or didn't cover whatever they wanted..and could also set limits on how much they would pay.

If you were young and healthy, this was a much better deal. If you were older/sicker it was not so good. If you had too many health issues, you were just denied policies entirely.

  
Ok - I get that. 

With ACA in place, there are now just no options for people like OP to get medical coverage? Are there no off-ACA market insurance plans that he/she would be eligible for? 

And now the political part (sorry) - 
If the ACA was to be repealed and replaced with what AHCA looks like (or not, either way) - we'd go back to a system where there are no minimum standards for health care coverage, but they would be more affordable (maybe)? Is that better (honest question)? While I realize there are millions of people fed up with premium increases - repealing ACA wouldn't solve that. Their premiums would be the same (or maybe slightly cheaper), but provide little to no coverage for high cost health care when it is actually needed. 
 

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We could help OP far more if he provided his state and county. Without that info we can't get to helping him find alternatives.

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brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  Lol

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Moving may not be a good option. If it is imploding in one state, same thing will happen in other state - just matter of time.

What OP needs is a temporary 1 year solution first - hopefully things will be clear by end of year - as to which direction things go. I think by end of this year - you would know what happens.

Is not having insurance at all an option? The pre-existing option is not going away - so worst case OP gets an insurance later on if needed. Otherwise, wait for year end to see what happens. I beleive they'll no longer collect the penalty.

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vnuts21 said:   
With ACA in place, there are now just no options for people like OP to get medical coverage? Are there no off-ACA market insurance plans that he/she would be eligible for? 


The short answers are :
yes, no

If no insurers offer plans in the county then there are no options for individual health insurance.   You can buy insurance off an exchange or direct from the insurer but if theres no insurers then theres no insurers.   However in OP's case it seems there is 1 option but its not a good one.

To sell health insurance it has to be ACA qualified.   But there are a couple exemptions that might work to provide coverage for some people.   Health ministries are exempt.   They basically offer coop insurance via a church group which isn't technically insurance and has religious connection.   These operate effectively like insurance though.   You can also get a short term health insurance policy which doesn't have to meet ACA rules, but by definition they only last months.   Neither of these have all the coverages mandated by ACA but are generally cheaper than real insurance.

And just to be clear, employer provided insurance and medicare/ medicaid /VA, all still operate of course and cover most people but presumably none of these apply to OP.

 

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brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  Somewhat true. We really need to abolish employer paid insurance and just have a single nationwide risk pool. Salaries would be correspondingly higher if employers didn't supply health benefits.

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I think moving to another state is a short term solution. If the repeal law passes, it will happen to all states.

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The states that generally have multiple insurers per county tend to be blue states, while red states are struggling with insurers pulling out. I'm not sure of the exact reason, but the ACA does seem to be doing better in states that support it.

If you do plan to move, consider moving to a blue state. It's probably a safer bet that health insurance will be available there.

If health insurance is extremely important to you, consider an international move. Canada would be easiest (same language, and close by). All other G-7 countries have health insurance for everyone.

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Oh yah, everyone talks about Canada's Health Care system.

You know it takes over 4 months to see a specialist in Canada?
Ask anyone here who is on Medicare, ask them how long it takes to schedule visits.

I don't know about other states but in CA it takes 2-4 weeks to see a specialist under the ACA.

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Moving states not gonna help you bru

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canoeguy1 said:    All other G-7 countries have health insurance for everyone.
 

  
They have health care for everyone. Health care != health insurance, one is to assist the sick while the other is to make money.

Sorry OP, what a problem. This may be happening to more and more people going forward, but I hope not. smh

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TravelerMSY said:   
brettdoyle said:   Obamacare can't work in any state. It just so happens to be imploding faster in some places than others. You are just seeing the adverse selection play out. Every year the premium increase, the healthy will leave, premiums rise more, until the whole system collapses.
  Somewhat true. We really need to abolish employer paid insurance and just have a single nationwide risk pool. Salaries would be correspondingly higher if employers didn't supply health benefits.

  or make it mandatory for employers to buy health insurance on the exchange.

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marktylerirrific said:   Moving states not gonna help you bru

  Agreed .. because you don't know right now ... the state you move to could have same issue few months down the line.

  Because we are in a transition phase - and there will be some change in the law - i would just get the 1 insurance that is left (even though it is not exactly what OP wants).  Then see what are the long term options by end of the year.  
 

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canoeguy1 said:   The states that generally have multiple insurers per county tend to be blue states, while red states are struggling with insurers pulling out. I'm not sure of the exact reason, but the ACA does seem to be doing better in states that support it.

If you do plan to move, consider moving to a blue state. It's probably a safer bet that health insurance will be available there.

  I don't know about red vs blue states, but here's the government's June'17 forecast of the number of 2018 ACA insurance carriers available by county for the country.  You can see how your "choice" is looking for next year and in surrounding areas.

https://downloads.cms.gov/files/cciio-exchange-carriers-by-count...

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lonestarguy said:   We could help OP far more if he provided his state and county. Without that info we can't get to helping him find alternatives.
Based on news reports from the past week, I'd guess rural Nevada.
lonestarguy said:   There are many companies selling policies off of the exchange without subsidies. Or get a job with a company that provides employee coverage.
Really?  I assumed once they left the exchange, they stopped selling policies altogether.  Is there enough of a population for that?
>>>>Decided to look up rates myself
Looked up Health Insurance on the NV exchange for a 55-year old male non-smoker who makes $50,000/year .  Estimates (wife 54, kid #1 20, kid #2 17), choose middle for amount of care expected.
I picked 89008, Caliente NV.  I assume that is rural.  There were 19 plans on average on the exchange, but only 1 provider, Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield.  This is assuming someone lost coverage, so is current rates (with subsidy where appropriate)
These are for the Estimated Out of Pocket costs for the year 
  
  Subsidy (monthly) Silver Plan (w/ subsidy) Bronze Plan  Gold Plan
Married, 2 children      $1575   $6109  -  $10488  $5900 - $7500 $19K - $20K
Married, 1 child      $1513   $6609  -  $10488  $6700 - $8266  $18K- $19K
Married, 0 kids      $1213   $7583  -  $11413  $7837 - $9104  $18K - $18.5K
Single          $0   $11,415 - $13,368 $11,500 - $13,368  $16K - $17K

There's also 2 dental providers, with plans from $21 - $50/month for single.

Losing that subsidy could very well be devastating.  But I can see the complaint that people can't afford bronze, but the "freeloaders" with the subsidies could get basically free silver plans.

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Massachusetts is a great place to move if you need health insurance. It's among the cheapest in the country because they have 98% compliance with sign ups. That lowers the premiums as the risk pool is about the largest it can be. Also, state laws appear to thwart hospital consolidation, so there is competition. Premiums are 50% lower in MA than in most of Texas, for example, even though the cost of living is much higher in the former.
The worse states for ACA insurance are rural ones, which have been in trouble for years anyway due to lack of providers, and those that have high adverse selection, where the risk pool skews sick and old.

Skipping 20 Messages...
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This thread could not stay on the topic of the OP. So it is now locked.



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