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rated:
My resume was forwarded by my friend to his friend (in company X). X has outsourced the role I fit to Y. So company X forwards the resume to Y and asks Y to bring me on board.

The account manager at Y calls and talks to me about my experience and forwards to delivery manager. The delivery manager does not respond immediately  but after me following up with the account manager calls and talks to me about what I would like to do. He says that I can help with what company X wants for a few months and should move over into much bigger things based on what's on my resume and asks me what I would like to transition into.

A few minutes after the call, he follows up with an email that he will setup some time in the next 2 days with him and his boss and a few others. I wait for 5 days and follow up and he says he's been busy and will surely setup something the next day. Two days go by and I don't hear anything, so I call him to follow up. He says he's driving but will give me a call when he gets to work. And that does not happen either.

Is this a hint that they are not interested in me or is it because this delivery manager from the get-go is a procrastinator/busy? What should I do to get me to the next steps of getting this job?

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An update:

Left voicemail for the delivery manager early yesterday on his work phone. Almost end of day he called me back... (more)

Veeekay (Jul. 08, 2017 @ 7:53a) |

In this specific instance, I'd admit I gave the incorrect advice about an absolute "do not reach out".

If the holdup was ... (more)

puddonhead (Jul. 08, 2017 @ 10:17a) |

Congrats! I would wait for an offer, as long as the offer comes next week. Then I would ask for some some time for a cal... (more)

scrouds (Jul. 08, 2017 @ 2:07p) |

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rated:
1) If they really wanted you, they should be more proactive to bring you on board.
2) Doesn't seem like a boss that you would want to work for.
3) Seems like a lot of waiting around. You're pursing other options right?

rated:
If the delivery manager is not in charge of hiring, then your resume has been pushed from person-to-person because no one is interested.  If the delivery manager is the one in charge of hiring, it seems that everyone is interested in you, except the delivery manager.  If the delivery manager is in charge of hiring, then either 1) he thinks the referral is casual, and doesn't understand that everyone else really does want you, 2) he is a poor manager of his own time, 3) he is intimidated, and is afraid that he could lose his job to you.

Call the account manager again and ask him if they are planning on setting up a face-to-face or should you entertain the other offhers you have.  His response should give you a pretty good idea regarding where you sit with the company.  But, be aware, the delivery manager might not appreciate it, and if you end up working for him, he might hold it against you that you went over his head twice... chain of command.

rated:
Move on.....

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What's the delivery manager have to do it? Is this for a job at UPS or Fedex? Isn't it the personel deparment that should contact you?

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are you really sure the real client (company X) does indeed need you and have this open slot? If your friend can confirm this then you automatically know next steps....

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Don't reach out to them!

In a job interview, never show that you are too eager.

Things can remain in flux for months for many reasons. I have seen a resume being essentially pushed around for 3 months, interviewed by 3 separate teams, and then suddenly two separate managers (in the same organization) fighting among themselves to hire this guy!

Life happens. Always be ready to move on. Never show you are too eager when you are negotiating something.

rated:
puddonhead said:   Don't reach out to them!

In a job interview, never show that you are too eager.

Things can remain in flux for months for many reasons. I have seen a resume being essentially pushed around for 3 months, interviewed by 3 separate teams, and then suddenly two separate managers (in the same organization) fighting among themselves to hire this guy!

Life happens. Always be ready to move on. Never show you are too eager when you are negotiating something.

  
I disagree with not reaching out.  Although it is true that you lose a negotiating advantage if you appear eager, many serious employers see follow up as a sign of a responsible employee, which can actually increase your ability to negotiate.  

rated:
puddonhead said:   Don't reach out to them!

In a job interview, never show that you are too eager.

Things can remain in flux for months for many reasons. I have seen a resume being essentially pushed around for 3 months, interviewed by 3 separate teams, and then suddenly two separate managers (in the same organization) fighting among themselves to hire this guy!

Life happens. Always be ready to move on. Never show you are too eager when you are negotiating something.
 

  
"Job search" and "don't reach out" don't go hand-in-hand. They both don't belong in the same league.....never!!!!!

rated:
dealgain said:   
 
"Job search" and "don't reach out" don't go hand-in-hand. They both don't belong in the same league.....never!!!!!

  I think that's a triple negative, or maybe even a quadruple negative. I really cannot tell what you mean.  Should OP reach out or not? 

rated:
If you have to reach out for a job, then they don't want you.

Move on OP, maybe Company X was just trying to tell you in a roundabout way, 'We don't want you'

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Stubtify said:   
dealgain said:   
 
"Job search" and "don't reach out" don't go hand-in-hand. They both don't belong in the same league.....never!!!!!

  I think that's a triple negative, or maybe even a quadruple negative. I really cannot tell what you mean.  Should OP reach out or not? 

  SAD!

rated:
RussellJohnson said:   1) If they really wanted you, they should be more proactive to bring you on board.
2) Doesn't seem like a boss that you would want to work for.
3) Seems like a lot of waiting around. You're pursing other options right?

  
Agreed on 2.  If you would be working for this non-responsive manager, I would move on.
 

rated:
Guys - too much speculation here!!

There are many, many reasons the employer may be dragging their feet, many of which may have nothing to do with how desirable the candidate is!!

I have been on both sides of the table multiple times. As a candidate, don't fixate on one employer. Even if you do, don't let it out that you do. Move on and look at other opportunities.

The only appropriate follow-up is a thank you note a few days from the interview and a very gentle, tentative request for any feedback that the interviewers may be able to give you. That's it!

rated:
I have reviewed thousands of resumes.  I have conducted countless interviews, and I have hired dozens of employees.  These are the things that always make an impression on me:

  1. A resume that has no spelling errors.  If the candidate doesn't care enough to have proofread their resume, 1) they are not detail-oriented, 2) their work will likely be sloppy, and 3) if they don't care about their own reputation, theycertainly won't be a good representative of their employer.
  2. I always ask the candidate, "Outside of work/career, what is the accomplishment you are most proud of in your personal life?"  I want an employee who understands the need for work/life balance, and if their greatest accomplishment has to do with family, their motivation to do a good job is founded in providing for loved ones.  That means a lot.  The best answers have been being happily married for 24 years, being sober for 29 years, raising a daughter who is respectful and well mannered, etc.  The worst was a guy who's head nearly exploded when I asked the question, and his response was, "Keeping a palm tree alive in Minnesota for 8 years."
  3. Candidates who are confident they can learn the position and do a good job, not a candidate that is an egomaniac and implies they already know what the company wants.
  4. A candidate who follows up due to sincere interest in the position, by means of a call or e-mail.  If the individual is genuinely interested in the position, they are generally motivated to do a good job, and are not just job hopping.

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"Keeping a palm tree alive in Minnesota for 8 years."

That's quite an accomplishment.

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snnistle's comment is right on. One thing to add for OP: You're interviewing the company just as much as they're interviewing you.

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ZenNUTS said:   "Keeping a palm tree alive in Minnesota for 8 years."

That's quite an accomplishment.

  
It is, but you really needed to see this guy.  He wrapped his arms around his head, started breathing heavy, puffing his cheeks, and popping his lips.  He says, "Wow!  That's a tough question."  And then gave me his answer.  It was a spectacle!  Needless to say, he was not hired.  But I still get a good laugh out of it now and then.

rated:
Stubtify said:   snnistle's comment is right on. One thing to add for OP: You're interviewing the company just as much as they're interviewing you.
  ^^^ Absolutely 100% spot on!

rated:
An update:

Left voicemail for the delivery manager early yesterday on his work phone. Almost end of day he called me back and apologized for not responding sooner. He said he was trying to get hold of his boss for a day and couldn't because his boss was on a 20+ hr flight. He just heard back that he (the boss) would like to go ahead with the offer just based on the comments given by the account manager and delivery manager. He (the boss) would let know of the details of the offer through the delivery manager.

I would be a peer to the delivery manager that interviewed me. The delivery manager gave me a brief of the role description and said I will hear more detailed info from the account manager. He also said his boss had told him that I would be in the role for 6-8 months and then move on to do better things.

Though I am excited that I can expect an offer, I was expecting to speak with the boss and understand who I would be working for and his expectations. Would requesting a telephonic chat with the boss if not a face to face be a wrong move?

rated:
In this specific instance, I'd admit I gave the incorrect advice about an absolute "do not reach out".

If the holdup was a middle-management tech guy - then he would likely not be involved in the salary discussion. So you would not be adversely impacted there as long as you don't signal any kind of "desperation" for this job.

rated:
Veeekay said:   An update:

Left voicemail for the delivery manager early yesterday on his work phone. Almost end of day he called me back and apologized for not responding sooner. He said he was trying to get hold of his boss for a day and couldn't because his boss was on a 20+ hr flight. He just heard back that he (the boss) would like to go ahead with the offer just based on the comments given by the account manager and delivery manager. He (the boss) would let know of the details of the offer through the delivery manager.

I would be a peer to the delivery manager that interviewed me. The delivery manager gave me a brief of the role description and said I will hear more detailed info from the account manager. He also said his boss had told him that I would be in the role for 6-8 months and then move on to do better things.

Though I am excited that I can expect an offer, I was expecting to speak with the boss and understand who I would be working for and his expectations. Would requesting a telephonic chat with the boss if not a face to face be a wrong move?


Congrats! I would wait for an offer, as long as the offer comes next week. Then I would ask for some some time for a call or meeting.

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