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rated:
Has anyone exercised their states scanner accuracy law to get a bounty on a price mistake in a B&M? I just referenced the law at my local walmart and they quickly and painlessly paid me $10 for something that rang up $14 higher than the shelf sticker. The cs rep said they only give it when a customer explicitly mentions the law and many don't.

I've tried this at a 7-11 but the cashier had no idea what I was talking about and I didn't have the will to push the issue.

Anyone else have stories of using such laws successfully, and if not if there's any recourse? As I understand it, if you bought 10 different upcs that scanned incorrectly you'd get (in my state) $100 cash on the spot.

My counties law is referenced below:

http://www2.erie.gov/law/index.php?q=erie-county039s-scanner-acc...

"Section Eleven. Consumer's right to special payment if overcharged by a store granted a waiver from item pricing. Any person who suffers a loss because the price charged for a SKI, by a store which has been granted a waiver from item pricing pursuant to section ten of this local law, is greater than the least of the item, shelf, sale, or advertised price may seek special payment by notifying the store in person or in writing that the price charged is more than the item, sale, shelf, or advertised price. The notice shall include evidence of the loss suffered by the consumer. As soon as practical, and in any case within one hour after receipt of such notification and verification of the overcharge, the store shall tender to the consumer an amount equal to the difference between the price charged and the least of the item, sale, shelf, or advertised price, plus an amount equal to ten times that difference, but not less than one dollar nor more than ten dollars. If the loss is suffered by one consumer within one transaction on two or more identical SKIs, the amount to be tendered by the store shall be the difference on each item, plus an amount equal to ten times the difference on a single item, but not less than one dollar nor more than ten dollars. "

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Most Recent Posts
You asked for a list of scanner laws compiled by the federal government. Crabbing had already delivered.

doveroftke (Aug. 15, 2017 @ 1:02p) |

@doveroftke

Crabbing "sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary."

zapjb "No coherent, spec... (more)

zapjb (Aug. 15, 2017 @ 5:03p) |

In California it looks like the retailer must honor the posted price. No "penalty" for the retailer or "reward" for the ... (more)

nomenclature (Aug. 16, 2017 @ 7:41p) |

State Law
Alabama none
Alaska  
Arizona  No. Stores are not required to give you the item for free, but some stores do.
Arizona law requires that all stores have a written pricing error policy that must be available to customers. Ask for it if a pricing error occurs.
Arkansas  
California Retailer must honor the posted price. No "penalty" for the retailer or "reward" for the consumer for the price discrepancy. source: http://consumerwiki.dca.ca.gov/wiki/index.php/Item_Pricing/Item_Pricing_Accuracy
Colorado  Must sell at shelf price or face $100 fine
Connecticut  
Delaware  
Florida  
Georgia  
Hawaii  
Idaho  
Illinois  
Indiana  
Iowa  
Kansas  
Kentucky  
Louisiana  
Maine  
Maryland  
Massachusetts  Free if item is <$10, or $10 off
Michigan  10x the price difference, $1 min, $5 max
Minnesota  
Mississippi  
Missouri  no compensation
Montana  
Nebraska  
Nevada  
New Hampshire  
New Jersey  
New Mexico  
New York  Erie County: $10
North Carolina  
North Dakota  
Ohio If the store will not sell the product to you at the advertised price, you may choose to pay the higher price and then sue the store to get back the overcharge amount.
You may be entitled to $200 for each violation; in some cases you may be able to recover three times the price difference.
Oklahoma  
Oregon  
Pennsylvania  
Rhode Island  
South Carolina  
South Dakota  
Tennessee  
Texas Haha
Utah  
Vermont  
Virginia  
Washington  
West Virginia  
Wisconsin  
Wyoming  

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rated:
Anything in PHX AZ?

Have failed at some stores but I thought it was store policy rather then law.

rated:
CowbellMaster said:   
Anyone else have stories of using such laws successfully, and if not if there's any recourse? As I understand it, if you bought 10 different upcs that scanned incorrectly you'd get (in my state) $100 cash on the spot.

 

That's true in theory - although it isnt in your state, it's in your county. But it's relatively rare (or at least it used to be) to find that many $1 discrepancies at a store. But find one item, then buy 10 of them in separate transactions before notifying the store of the discrepancy.
  
You should write 7-11, and demand additional penalties for their ongoing noncompliance, since it's been well over an hour since you notified the employee of the overcharge.

rated:
needhelpplease said:   Anything in PHX AZ?

Have failed at some stores but I thought it was store policy rather then law.

  OP is referring to a specific county's law.  It's unknown how many states/counties/cities have similar laws.

rated:
Glitch99 said:   CowbellMaster said:   
Anyone else have stories of using such laws successfully, and if not if there's any recourse? As I understand it, if you bought 10 different upcs that scanned incorrectly you'd get (in my state) $100 cash on the spot.

 

That's true in theory - although it isnt in your state, it's in your county. But it's relatively rare (or at least it used to be) to find that many $1 discrepancies at a store. But find one item, then buy 10 of them in separate transactions before notifying the store of the discrepancy.
  
You should write 7-11, and demand additional penalties for their ongoing noncompliance, since it's been well over an hour since you notified the employee of the overcharge.


Not sure 10 different transactions with the same item will work, but I know someone that discovered jello boxes rang up $1 higher than they were supposed to be and promptly went back and bought one of every flavor... There are over 50 flavors, sugar free, etc. Management grumbled but he walked out with around $600 in cash from that.

Honestly these days it's the only reason I pay attention to prices of little things at the grocery store.

rated:
Michigan has a similar law. You get 10x the price difference, $1 min, $5 max, as a bounty, plus the price difference back. If you bought multiples of the same item, you only get the bounty once. I am not sure how it works if multiple different items ring up incorrectly. A quirk was that if you corrected the price at the register, you didn't get the bounty. You only got that if you actually *paid* the incorrect price and then had to go back to customer service for the refund. Most of the time, it's not worth the bother for the $5 and I'll get the price fixed at the register.

Had one time at BBY where they refused to issue the bounty. Sued them in small claims. The law allowed for a $250 bounty in court. They didn't show or pay the judgment. Would have loved to tag along with the sheriff when they went to execute the judgment and seize store assets just to see the look on their faces. Got a check real quick after that.

It used to be easier back when MI had the law that all items had to have a price sticker on them and that was what was compared to the scanner. They amended the law to allow shelf tags rather than individual item pricing.

rated:
I could swear it happens all the time at Home Depot but for 5 or 10 cents on some hardware, so not worth the trouble to walk back to the aisle to double check the prices. No idea you could profit off the mistake.

rated:
So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?

rated:
Very location specific, but I've hit this hard in the past, once over the course of a week for more than  $150, it even became a running joke until the store manager got involved and tried to deny me but caved after I pressed the issue. The key was buying the items and then going for the price adjustment and refund of over-payment because if you bring it up beforehand they could limit quantity, but after the fact it's too late as they can't force you to return the items.

rated:
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?

Do you have internet where you live?

rated:
shadow520 said:   It used to be easier back when MI had the law that all items had to have a price sticker on them and that was what was compared to the scanner. They amended the law to allow shelf tags rather than individual item pricing.
 

  
Like the county law mentioned in the OP, you have to pay the money to suffer the loss and be compensated.
What ticks me off is when some of the larger stores think a scattering of price scanners throughout the store is an adequate replacement for shelf pricing. If I had $5 for every time I saw an end aisle display at Meijers with no price in sight...

rated:
You can get rich at Family Dollar, they are the worst for this. Shelf Tag Price often different from Receipt Price. I catch it all the time but never have pushed for anything other than a refund of the difference..

rated:
taxmantoo said:   
shadow520 said:   It used to be easier back when MI had the law that all items had to have a price sticker on them and that was what was compared to the scanner. They amended the law to allow shelf tags rather than individual item pricing.
  
Like the county law mentioned in the OP, you have to pay the money to suffer the loss and be compensated.
What ticks me off is when some of the larger stores think a scattering of price scanners throughout the store is an adequate replacement for shelf pricing. If I had $5 for every time I saw an end aisle display at Meijers with no price in sight...

  The county mentioned by OP does regular tag audits of stores, and fines them for any missing shelf tags.

rated:
atikovi said:   I could swear it happens all the time at Home Depot but for 5 or 10 cents on some hardware, so not worth the trouble to walk back to the aisle to double check the prices. No idea you could profit off the mistake.
  
Had that happen to me at Home Depot once, bought one of those multi ladders and it rang up $50 more than the sticker. I think it was on sale at one point and they didn't get rid of the sticker so due to item pricing law they gave me the sticker price after I complained. Forgot about the scanner law. Anyway, when I got it to my car, the ladder didn't quite fit. For a moment I contemplated returning it, but then took it out of the packaging and was able to take it apart so that it fit. 

rated:
No such law where I live, as far as I know, but many grocery stores have a price accuracy guarantee which entitles you to one unit for free when things ring up wrong. My dad used to go to the 24-hour grocery store near us on the night when the sales changed and get a bunch of stuff free when they'd be changing out the tags prior to updating the register. I'd never intentionally do that, but I do check my receipts before I leave the parking lot; I'd estimate that I average one free thing a month (happens most often on store clearance items).

rated:
I do it all the time!  I actually keep my eyes out for things like this and exploit the hell out of it when I can.  Any store sufficiently large to have a dedicated customer service desk should know all the state laws required - if you are concerned, most states offer a printable wallet size that you can carry around.  Hardly a week goes by without me "claiming a bounty" or two...  I think I could almost consider myself a modern day bounty hunter

I've even elevated to the state attourney general a few times when the stores are being dicks about it.

rated:
Some police do not like you listing to them.

O you are talking about barcode readers. From what I could find in Kansas you have to fill out a form and send it to the state. Your reward..... The expense of a stamp?

rated:
Q: IF I GO TO A STORE AND THEY CHARGE ME THE WRONG PRICE, ARE THEY REQUIRED TO GIVE ME THE ITEM FOR FREE?
A: No. Stores are not required to give you the item for free, but some stores do. Arizona law requires that all stores have a written pricing error policy that must be available to customers. Ask for it if a pricing error occurs.

rated:
THAT WAS FOR THE GUY FROM PHOENIX, AZ

rated:
quickfatwallet said:   Q: IF I GO TO A STORE AND THEY CHARGE ME THE WRONG PRICE, ARE THEY REQUIRED TO GIVE ME THE ITEM FOR FREE?
A: No. Stores are not required to give you the item for free, but some stores do. Arizona law requires that all stores have a written pricing error policy that must be available to customers. Ask for it if a pricing error occurs.

 That's what I thought.
which ones? I know Albertsons honors 1 free

Anything specific for Maricopa county  https://www.bing.com/search?q=scanner%20accuracy%20law%20Maricopa%20county%C2%A0&qs=n&form=QBRE&sp=-1&pq=undefined&sc=0-37&sk=&cvid=9750B772041D41F08159B7ACB57B2B80 brings up frequencies

rated:
I think it will never work in smaller stores, they either never heard of it, or they just flat out refuse to honor it.

rated:
TheDealMaker said:   I think it will never work in smaller stores, they either never heard of it, or they just flat out refuse to honor it.
  There's nothing to "honor".  Either they follow the law, or they're forced to abandon scanning and return to hand pricing - putting a price sticker on every single item in the store, then typing each price into the register when selling it.

rated:
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?
  Yes this. And I did Google. No coherent, specific or relevant results.

rated:
shadow520 said:   Michigan has a similar law. You get 10x the price difference, $1 min, $5 max, as a bounty, plus the price difference back. If you bought multiples of the same item, you only get the bounty once. I am not sure how it works if multiple different items ring up incorrectly. A quirk was that if you corrected the price at the register, you didn't get the bounty. You only got that if you actually *paid* the incorrect price and then had to go back to customer service for the refund. Most of the time, it's not worth the bother for the $5 and I'll get the price fixed at the register.

Had one time at BBY where they refused to issue the bounty. Sued them in small claims. The law allowed for a $250 bounty in court. They didn't show or pay the judgment. Would have loved to tag along with the sheriff when they went to execute the judgment and seize store assets just to see the look on their faces. Got a check real quick after that.

It used to be easier back when MI had the law that all items had to have a price sticker on them and that was what was compared to the scanner. They amended the law to allow shelf tags rather than individual item pricing.

  Here some specific example where it can apply and where not:  http://www.bargainstobounty.com/2015/07/michigan-scanner-law/

I have used in the past but often not worth the time hassle unless empty queue at CS desk
 

rated:
Ontario Canada has scanning code of practice that many stores follow voluntarily. If the item scans higher than the advertised price on the shelf you get up to $10 off, and it is free if it is under $10. Only the first item is free if you buy multiple.

rated:
Massachusetts has a similar law - for grocery stores and food departments of larger stores, you get the item for free if it's under $10, or a $10 discount if it's more than that. I managed to get 2 lbs of lamb chops for around $4 after I argued with the manager that they actually did have to follow what the signs they're legally required to post at the cash registers says.

http://www.mass.gov/ago/consumer-resources/consumer-information/...

rated:
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?
 

https://www.nist.gov/pml/weights-and-measures/us-retail-pricing-...

sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary.

rated:
In Arizona there's no requirement to provide a certain discount for any pricing mistake.  Stores only need to make available their scanner mispricing policy and a pen for the customer to write down prices: government link  

Stores commonly violate the federal Magnuson-Moss Warranty act, which requires them to let customers see the warranty of anything costing at least $25.

rated:
NOT blaming anyone at FW.

But this is so stupid there's not a Federal Government link to all 50 states individual laws on this.

And yes I Googled.

rated:
CowbellMaster said:   
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?

Do you have internet where you live?

  Why didn't you search before being a smarta**? It is not readily available anywhere on the internet. And if you have that list, you should share it with the FWF community. 

rated:
Maybe instead of complaining lets try to fix it! Please take a look at the wiki and see if your state is covered. If not, do some googling and fill in what you can. Also add links to the state name where available, we want to be a reliable source of info!

rated:
zapjb said:   NOT blaming anyone at FW.

But this is so stupid there's not a Federal Government link to all 50 states individual laws on this.

And yes I Googled.

  
crabbing said:   
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?
https://www.nist.gov/pml/weights-and-measures/us-retail-pricing-laws-and-regulations-state

sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary.

 
 

rated:
doveroftke said:   
zapjb said:   NOT blaming anyone at FW.

But this is so stupid there's not a Federal Government link to all 50 states individual laws on this.

And yes I Googled.

  
crabbing said:   
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?
https://www.nist.gov/pml/weights-and-measures/us-retail-pricing-laws-and-regulations-state 

sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary.

 

  What are you saying? I don't see your comment anywhere.

rated:
zapjb said:   
doveroftke said:   
zapjb said:   NOT blaming anyone at FW.

But this is so stupid there's not a Federal Government link to all 50 states individual laws on this.

And yes I Googled.

  
crabbing said:   
ablang said:   So where can we find a list of scanner laws by state?
https://www.nist.gov/pml/weights-and-measures/us-retail-pricing-laws-and-regulations-state 

sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary.


  What are you saying? I don't see your comment anywhere.

  
You asked for a list of scanner laws compiled by the federal government. Crabbing had already delivered.

rated:
@doveroftke

Crabbing "sadly, it's just the text of the laws and not a consumer-friendly summary."

zapjb "No coherent, specific or relevant results."

 

rated:
In California it looks like the retailer must honor the posted price. No "penalty" for the retailer or "reward" for the consumer for the price discrepancy.

source: http://consumerwiki.dca.ca.gov/wiki/index.php/Item_Pricing/Item_...

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