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This study for " high fluoride content" was based on research in China for  where "... The researchers conducted a syste... (more)

svap (Aug. 21, 2017 @ 9:42a) |

Doesn't this come from some Spring in Poland?

Ever spelled EVIAN backwards?

rsuaver (Aug. 21, 2017 @ 3:58p) |

I am not an expert on springs, but hike through the woods in the lakes region around Poland Maine and you can find water... (more)

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rated:
Anybody who is buying bottled water because they think they're getting something special is just... I can't even find the right word.

I only buy it for two reasons myself: convenience or flavor (most flavored seltzer waters like La Croix, but not La Croix, I drink the cheaper Kroger brand). Otherwise, tap water is strongly preferred, though I'm lucky enough to live in a place that has really good tap water.

rated:
Ever since i found out my towns water is highly contaminated with dihydrogen oxide i have refused to drink it. i heard most bottled water is full of it too.

rated:
You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

I'd drink tap if I lived in Iceland, New Zealand, or San Francisco (in that order), but not in LA, whose water is imported and mixed from multiple sources from hundreds of miles away, and there's uranium slowly leeching into the Colorado river from a mine not far away from the river. Plus the water doesn't smell or taste good. I can afford to gamble $1 a week  on a Gallon of my favorite Spring water. Not Poland Spring, though I've tasted it and it was pretty good.

rated:
lonestarguy said:   Ever since i found out my towns water is highly contaminated with dihydrogen oxide i have refused to drink it. i heard most bottled water is full of it too.
  Yeah, and some of those supplies have Hydroxyl acid as well.  Talk about pollution everywhere you look.

rated:
How can I use this information to benefit financially, or has OP consumed so much Poland Spring that he has no concept of what the Finance forum is for?

rated:
MISTERCHEAP said:   Lawsuit claims Poland Spring a ‘colossal fraud,’ selling groundwater
  Springs are in the ground so water from springs IS groundwater. I'm guessing this is some class action suit where the lawyers make millions and the people drinking the water will get $2 coupons. 

rated:
scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

 

  Actually, some tests are completed at your house, or at least your neighbor's house... The Lead and Copper Rule requires samples to be collected from resident's taps -- kitchen sinks, usually.  The sample sites are specified to be from houses with either lead service lines or with copper pipes installed prior to the lead-in-solder ban.  So, it's a pretty good representation of sites subject to potential contamination.  Note I wrote "potential".  The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy) Same with copper -- very few houses have elevated copper levels even though the water goes through copper pipes.  

Most contaminants don't change much from plant / well to tap -- dihydrogen monoxide (I LOVE that joke), volatile organics, most metals, etc -- they don't rise or fall in concentration through the pipes.  A very few contaminants CAN change along the way -- copper, as in your post, as well as a few radiologicals (almost all naturally occurring, not from man-made contamination) and a few things that are produced along with the disinfection process.  

Most drinking water quality regs are based on one death per million people over a 70 year lifespan.  Compare that to the risk of crossing the street, and tap water comes up a pretty safe product.  All in all, US tap water is unbelievably safe to drink.  

rated:
atikovi said:   
MISTERCHEAP said:   Lawsuit claims Poland Spring a ‘colossal fraud,’ selling groundwater
  Springs are in the ground so water from springs IS groundwater. I'm guessing this is some class action suit where the lawyers make millions and the people drinking the water will get $2 coupons. 

 
It depends on what they actually SAY they are selling.  A lot of the brands under Nestle are purified from a municipal source and it clearly says so.  If they are either steam distilling or RO+post processing then it is clean water.  Which is often done to "Spring water" anyway.

Honestly if you are buying water for more than $5-10 a week then you might as well just buy a RO system for $200 or so.  Even the cheap ones are pretty good, and you can add ph with mineral post-filters.  They have come WAY down in price in the last few years.  If you are concerned about the efficiency then add a permeate or boost pump to it.  That tends to reduce the waste water significantly.

rated:
RedWolfe01 said:   
atikovi said:   
MISTERCHEAP said:   Lawsuit claims Poland Spring a ‘colossal fraud,’ selling groundwater
  Springs are in the ground so water from springs IS groundwater. I'm guessing this is some class action suit where the lawyers make millions and the people drinking the water will get $2 coupons. 

 
It depends on what they actually SAY they are selling.  A lot of the brands under Nestle are purified from a municipal source and it clearly says so.  If they are either steam distilling or RO+post processing then it is clean water.  Which is often done to "Spring water" anyway.

Honestly if you are buying water for more than $5-10 a week then you might as well just buy a RO system for $200 or so.  Even the cheap ones are pretty good, and you can add ph with mineral post-filters.  They have come WAY down in price in the last few years.  If you are concerned about the efficiency then add a permeate or boost pump to it.  That tends to reduce the waste water significantly.

  I assume (maybe incorrectly) that most people buy bottled water for portability, so they can take some with them to the park, the gym, etc. Can't image anyone would drink the stuff at home when they can get water for nothing from the tap. Personally, I just fill an empty plastic soft drink bottle with tap water and take that with me if I know there is no water fountain where I'm going.

rated:
debentureboy said:   
scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

 

  Actually, some tests are completed at your house, or at least your neighbor's house... The Lead and Copper Rule requires samples to be collected from resident's taps -- kitchen sinks, usually.  The sample sites are specified to be from houses with either lead service lines or with copper pipes installed prior to the lead-in-solder ban.  So, it's a pretty good representation of sites subject to potential contamination.  Note I wrote "potential".  The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy) Same with copper -- very few houses have elevated copper levels even though the water goes through copper pipes.  

Most contaminants don't change much from plant / well to tap -- dihydrogen monoxide (I LOVE that joke), volatile organics, most metals, etc -- they don't rise or fall in concentration through the pipes.  A very few contaminants CAN change along the way -- copper, as in your post, as well as a few radiologicals (almost all naturally occurring, not from man-made contamination) and a few things that are produced along with the disinfection process.  

Most drinking water quality regs are based on one death per million people over a 70 year lifespan.  Compare that to the risk of crossing the street, and tap water comes up a pretty safe product.  All in all, US tap water is unbelievably safe to drink.  

  Rather amazing considering the government pays chemical corporations to dispose of toxic waste (shouldn't it be the other way around???) in the public water supply and actually brags about it to the citizenry.  I'll take 1400 gallons a month, but hold the fluoride, please.

rated:

rated:
atikovi said:   
RedWolfe01 said:   
atikovi said:   
MISTERCHEAP said:   Lawsuit claims Poland Spring a ‘colossal fraud,’ selling groundwater
  Springs are in the ground so water from springs IS groundwater. I'm guessing this is some class action suit where the lawyers make millions and the people drinking the water will get $2 coupons. 

 
It depends on what they actually SAY they are selling.  A lot of the brands under Nestle are purified from a municipal source and it clearly says so.  If they are either steam distilling or RO+post processing then it is clean water.  Which is often done to "Spring water" anyway.

Honestly if you are buying water for more than $5-10 a week then you might as well just buy a RO system for $200 or so.  Even the cheap ones are pretty good, and you can add ph with mineral post-filters.  They have come WAY down in price in the last few years.  If you are concerned about the efficiency then add a permeate or boost pump to it.  That tends to reduce the waste water significantly.

  I assume (maybe incorrectly) that most people buy bottled water for portability, so they can take some with them to the park, the gym, etc. Can't image anyone would drink the stuff at home when they can get water for nothing from the tap. Personally, I just fill an empty plastic soft drink bottle with tap water and take that with me if I know there is no water fountain where I'm going.

I drink tap water, but I use bottled water to make coffee.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0QGnWnFWoxA



rated:
debentureboy said:    The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy)
 

  DC was worse, over a longer period of time.

rated:
elektronic said:   
debentureboy said:    The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy)
  DC was worse, over a longer period of time.

Correct.  I lived there at the time.  No one was fired, no one was really held accountable at all, and the issue attracted little attention outside of the nation's capital.  We live in a different environment now where everything is political and everything is sensationalized.  The water crisis in DC was far worse than that in Flint.  

rated:
DTASFAB said:   
  Rather amazing considering the government pays chemical corporations to dispose of toxic waste (shouldn't it be the other way around???) in the public water supply and actually brags about it to the citizenry.  I'll take 1400 gallons a month, but hold the fluoride, please.

  I don't know...  

As for the hazardous waste part, I throw up the BS penalty flag.  That is propaganda distributed from the anti-fluoride people.  (For those not familiar, many anti-fluoride people say that adding fluoride to drinking water was a ploy to get rid of a waste product (fluoride) of the phosphate fertilizer industry.)  What is the definition of a waste product?  200 years ago, manure was a fertilizer.  60 years ago it was a waste product.  Now it is a beneficial reuse product.  Pretty much all of our commodity chemicals have byproducts that could be considered waste or a beneficial use byproduct -- chlorine and caustic soda, ethanol and carbon dioxide (Yes, ethanol plants create a lot of carbon dioxide.  Some plants sell it).  Caustic and chlorine are both commonly used to treat drinking water.  Is one a waste product? 

Do you want fluoride in your water?  Some say it's a good thing, some don't want it.  I tend towards looking at it this way:  Adding iodine to table salt was a very good thing to avoid iodine deficiency.  Adding vitamin D to milk similarly improves health.  We have a choice as to whether we buy these products or not (non-iodized and non-vitamin D versions are available).  Water supply is typically a monopoly / municipally supplied product.  We tend, in the US, to not have add-ons to these types of products -- you don't need to do 15 minutes of jumping jacks in order to ride the municipal bus, even though doing so would improve your health.  You aren't required to eat your vegetables at the county food shelf.  

Some localities choose to put on requirements of various sorts...  fluoride in water is this sort of thing.  So in some states, it is required.  In some states it is not.  Some cities require it, some do not.  

So the bottom line to me is that it is a local decision.  If you disagree with the local decision, lobby your state or city or get an RO unit or buy bottled water.  

Fluoride is not required to be in water by federal standard.  Federal standards for fluoride only require that municipal drinking water does not exceed specified levels.  Pretty much everyone agrees that too much fluoride is bad.   

Sorry to thread jack.  End of rant. 

rated:
elektronic said:   
debentureboy said:    The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy)
  DC was worse, over a longer period of time.

  Yeah those movies haven't been that good, have they.

rated:
kamalktk said:   
elektronic said:   
debentureboy said:    The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy)
  DC was worse, over a longer period of time.

  Yeah those movies haven't been that good, have they.

  I heard WW was great but I didn't see it.

rated:
debentureboy said:   
DTASFAB said:   
  Rather amazing considering the government pays chemical corporations to dispose of toxic waste (shouldn't it be the other way around???) in the public water supply and actually brags about it to the citizenry.  I'll take 1400 gallons a month, but hold the fluoride, please.

  I don't know...  

As for the hazardous waste part, I throw up the BS penalty flag.  That is propaganda distributed from the anti-fluoride people.  (For those not familiar, many anti-fluoride people say that adding fluoride to drinking water was a ploy to get rid of a waste product (fluoride) of the phosphate fertilizer industry.)  What is the definition of a waste product?  200 years ago, manure was a fertilizer.  60 years ago it was a waste product.  Now it is a beneficial reuse product.  Pretty much all of our commodity chemicals have byproducts that could be considered waste or a beneficial use byproduct -- chlorine and caustic soda, ethanol and carbon dioxide (Yes, ethanol plants create a lot of carbon dioxide.  Some plants sell it).  Caustic and chlorine are both commonly used to treat drinking water.  Is one a waste product? 

Do you want fluoride in your water?  Some say it's a good thing, some don't want it.  I tend towards looking at it this way:  Adding iodine to table salt was a very good thing to avoid iodine deficiency.  Adding vitamin D to milk similarly improves health.  We have a choice as to whether we buy these products or not (non-iodized and non-vitamin D versions are available).  Water supply is typically a monopoly / municipally supplied product.  We tend, in the US, to not have add-ons to these types of products -- you don't need to do 15 minutes of jumping jacks in order to ride the municipal bus, even though doing so would improve your health.  You aren't required to eat your vegetables at the county food shelf.  

Some localities choose to put on requirements of various sorts...  fluoride in water is this sort of thing.  So in some states, it is required.  In some states it is not.  Some cities require it, some do not.  

So the bottom line to me is that it is a local decision.  If you disagree with the local decision, lobby your state or city or get an RO unit or buy bottled water.  

Fluoride is not required to be in water by federal standard.  Federal standards for fluoride only require that municipal drinking water does not exceed specified levels.  Pretty much everyone agrees that too much fluoride is bad.   

Sorry to thread jack.  End of rant. 

  There is some research which suggests that babies drinking fluoride water lowers IQ by 2-3 points.  I'm not sure if it's bunk or not and I've never really looked into it.  But if I ever have kids, I will for sure.  Babies don't need fluoride anyways.

rated:

rated:
snnistle said:   How can I use this information to benefit financially [...] Finance forum is for?
Avoiding fraudulent products, spending money wisely, being informed? I dunno.

rated:
scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

I'd drink tap if I lived in Iceland, New Zealand, or San Francisco (in that order), but not in LA, whose water is imported and mixed from multiple sources from hundreds of miles away, and there's uranium slowly leeching into the Colorado river from a mine not far away from the river. Plus the water doesn't smell or taste good. I can afford to gamble $1 a week  on a Gallon of my favorite Spring water. Not Poland Spring, though I've tasted it and it was pretty good.


I have yet to die from drinking "plutonium laced" Los Angeles tap water (where I live). I'll post an update if that changes.

rated:
burgerwars said:   
scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

I'd drink tap if I lived in Iceland, New Zealand, or San Francisco (in that order), but not in LA, whose water is imported and mixed from multiple sources from hundreds of miles away, and there's uranium slowly leeching into the Colorado river from a mine not far away from the river. Plus the water doesn't smell or taste good. I can afford to gamble $1 a week  on a Gallon of my favorite Spring water. Not Poland Spring, though I've tasted it and it was pretty good.


I have yet to die from drinking Los Angeles tap water (where I live). I'll post an update if that changes.

  You'd have a different view if you lived in Flint.

rated:
debentureboy said:   scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.Actually, some tests are completed at your house, or at least your neighbor's house... The Lead and Copper Rule requires samples to be collected from resident's taps -- kitchen sinks, usually.  The sample sites are specified to be from houses with either lead service lines or with copper pipes installed prior to the lead-in-solder ban.  So, it's a pretty good representation of sites subject to potential contamination.  Note I wrote "potential".  The vast majority of houses with lead service lines and lead soldered pipes do not have elevated lead levels -- only some smallish group has an issue (OK, so almost the whole city of Flint... THAT was a tragedy) Same with copper -- very few houses have elevated copper levels even though the water goes through copper pipes.  

Most contaminants don't change much from plant / well to tap -- dihydrogen monoxide (I LOVE that joke), volatile organics, most metals, etc -- they don't rise or fall in concentration through the pipes.  A very few contaminants CAN change along the way -- copper, as in your post, as well as a few radiologicals (almost all naturally occurring, not from man-made contamination) and a few things that are produced along with the disinfection process.  

Most drinking water quality regs are based on one death per million people over a 70 year lifespan.  Compare that to the risk of crossing the street, and tap water comes up a pretty safe product.  All in all, US tap water is unbelievably safe to drink.  
I never said it wasn't safe and you are right, they do test at some homes, but they don't test at MY HOUSE (exactly what I said in my post). My tap isn't very good smelling or tasting.

The radiological I was talking about isn't naturally occurring and is not a secret -- there's a uranium dump site right next to the Colorado River. LA/OC get like 40% of their water from the Colorado River. Also about 10% of the water in the OC supply is recycled gray water. I read that LA was also considering feeding recycled gray water back into the drinking supply. Even though scientifically that water is probably cleaner than the Colorado River, I'd still rather pay $1/week for Spring water. I'm a water snob.

rated:
atikovi said:   
RedWolfe01 said:   
atikovi said:   
MISTERCHEAP said:   Lawsuit claims Poland Spring a ‘colossal fraud,’ selling groundwater
  Springs are in the ground so water from springs IS groundwater. I'm guessing this is some class action suit where the lawyers make millions and the people drinking the water will get $2 coupons. 

 
It depends on what they actually SAY they are selling.  A lot of the brands under Nestle are purified from a municipal source and it clearly says so.  If they are either steam distilling or RO+post processing then it is clean water.  Which is often done to "Spring water" anyway.

Honestly if you are buying water for more than $5-10 a week then you might as well just buy a RO system for $200 or so.  Even the cheap ones are pretty good, and you can add ph with mineral post-filters.  They have come WAY down in price in the last few years.  If you are concerned about the efficiency then add a permeate or boost pump to it.  That tends to reduce the waste water significantly.

  I assume (maybe incorrectly) that most people buy bottled water for portability, so they can take some with them to the park, the gym, etc. Can't image anyone would drink the stuff at home when they can get water for nothing from the tap. Personally, I just fill an empty plastic soft drink bottle with tap water and take that with me if I know there is no water fountain where I'm going.

  
You are misunderstanding what a RO system is -- it basically removes the impurities in tap water and dispenses them via a separate tap.   I have no shortage of BPA free/polycarbonate plastic bottles, versus the cheap plastic used in a soft drink bottle.

https://www.amazon.com/iSpring-RCC7AK-Under-Sink-Filtration-Remineralization/dp/B005LJ8EXU

rated:
I've got one of these under my sink:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001DVW0PI/ref=olp_product_details?_en...

It has just enough of a psychological effect on me that I don't bother with bottled water anymore.

rated:
BostonOne said:   
burgerwars said:   
scripta said:   You jest, but even though most municipal supply is pretty clean (at or above the federal and state standards), by the time that water reaches your faucet it has gone through a system of 50-100 year old rusted steel and copper pipes, so it's probably not that clean. The water quality tests are done at the source and some distribution points, not at my house.

I'd drink tap if I lived in Iceland, New Zealand, or San Francisco (in that order), but not in LA, whose water is imported and mixed from multiple sources from hundreds of miles away, and there's uranium slowly leeching into the Colorado river from a mine not far away from the river. Plus the water doesn't smell or taste good. I can afford to gamble $1 a week  on a Gallon of my favorite Spring water. Not Poland Spring, though I've tasted it and it was pretty good.


I have yet to die from drinking Los Angeles tap water (where I live). I'll post an update if that changes.

  You'd have a different view if you lived in Flint.

  I'm pretty sure people living in Flint would be happy with LA tap water.

rated:
I only drink bottled water because I like the high bacteria content:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10728111

rated:
wilesmt said:   
debentureboy said:   
DTASFAB said:   
  Rather amazing considering the government pays chemical corporations to dispose of toxic waste (shouldn't it be the other way around???) in the public water supply and actually brags about it to the citizenry.  I'll take 1400 gallons a month, but hold the fluoride, please.

  I don't know...  

As for the hazardous waste part, I throw up the BS penalty flag.  That is propaganda distributed from the anti-fluoride people.  (For those not familiar, many anti-fluoride people say that adding fluoride to drinking water was a ploy to get rid of a waste product (fluoride) of the phosphate fertilizer industry.)  What is the definition of a waste product?  200 years ago, manure was a fertilizer.  60 years ago it was a waste product.  Now it is a beneficial reuse product.  Pretty much all of our commodity chemicals have byproducts that could be considered waste or a beneficial use byproduct -- chlorine and caustic soda, ethanol and carbon dioxide (Yes, ethanol plants create a lot of carbon dioxide.  Some plants sell it).  Caustic and chlorine are both commonly used to treat drinking water.  Is one a waste product? 

Do you want fluoride in your water?  Some say it's a good thing, some don't want it.  I tend towards looking at it this way:  Adding iodine to table salt was a very good thing to avoid iodine deficiency.  Adding vitamin D to milk similarly improves health.  We have a choice as to whether we buy these products or not (non-iodized and non-vitamin D versions are available).  Water supply is typically a monopoly / municipally supplied product.  We tend, in the US, to not have add-ons to these types of products -- you don't need to do 15 minutes of jumping jacks in order to ride the municipal bus, even though doing so would improve your health.  You aren't required to eat your vegetables at the county food shelf.  

Some localities choose to put on requirements of various sorts...  fluoride in water is this sort of thing.  So in some states, it is required.  In some states it is not.  Some cities require it, some do not.  

So the bottom line to me is that it is a local decision.  If you disagree with the local decision, lobby your state or city or get an RO unit or buy bottled water.  

Fluoride is not required to be in water by federal standard.  Federal standards for fluoride only require that municipal drinking water does not exceed specified levels.  Pretty much everyone agrees that too much fluoride is bad.   

Sorry to thread jack.  End of rant. 

  There is some research which suggests that babies drinking fluoride water lowers IQ by 2-3 points.  I'm not sure if it's bunk or not and I've never really looked into it.  But if I ever have kids, I will for sure.  Babies don't need fluoride anyways.

  http://www.snopes.com/water-fluoridation-reduces-iq/

Flouride starts being useful at around 6 months.

rated:
wilesmt said:   
debentureboy said:   
DTASFAB said:   
  Rather amazing considering the government pays chemical corporations to dispose of toxic waste (shouldn't it be the other way around???) in the public water supply and actually brags about it to the citizenry.  I'll take 1400 gallons a month, but hold the fluoride, please.

  I don't know...  

As for the hazardous waste part, I throw up the BS penalty flag.  That is propaganda distributed from the anti-fluoride people.  (For those not familiar, many anti-fluoride people say that adding fluoride to drinking water was a ploy to get rid of a waste product (fluoride) of the phosphate fertilizer industry.)  What is the definition of a waste product?  200 years ago, manure was a fertilizer.  60 years ago it was a waste product.  Now it is a beneficial reuse product.  Pretty much all of our commodity chemicals have byproducts that could be considered waste or a beneficial use byproduct -- chlorine and caustic soda, ethanol and carbon dioxide (Yes, ethanol plants create a lot of carbon dioxide.  Some plants sell it).  Caustic and chlorine are both commonly used to treat drinking water.  Is one a waste product? 

Do you want fluoride in your water?  Some say it's a good thing, some don't want it.  I tend towards looking at it this way:  Adding iodine to table salt was a very good thing to avoid iodine deficiency.  Adding vitamin D to milk similarly improves health.  We have a choice as to whether we buy these products or not (non-iodized and non-vitamin D versions are available).  Water supply is typically a monopoly / municipally supplied product.  We tend, in the US, to not have add-ons to these types of products -- you don't need to do 15 minutes of jumping jacks in order to ride the municipal bus, even though doing so would improve your health.  You aren't required to eat your vegetables at the county food shelf.  

Some localities choose to put on requirements of various sorts...  fluoride in water is this sort of thing.  So in some states, it is required.  In some states it is not.  Some cities require it, some do not.  

So the bottom line to me is that it is a local decision.  If you disagree with the local decision, lobby your state or city or get an RO unit or buy bottled water.  

Fluoride is not required to be in water by federal standard.  Federal standards for fluoride only require that municipal drinking water does not exceed specified levels.  Pretty much everyone agrees that too much fluoride is bad.   

Sorry to thread jack.  End of rant. 

  There is some research which suggests that babies drinking fluoride water lowers IQ by 2-3 points.  I'm not sure if it's bunk or not and I've never really looked into it.  But if I ever have kids, I will for sure.  Babies don't need fluoride anyways.

  This study for " high fluoride content" was based on research in China for  where "... The researchers conducted a systematic review of studies, almost all of which are from China where risks from fluoride are well-established. Fluoride is a naturally occurring substance in groundwater, and Exposures to the chemical are increased in some parts of China. Virtually no human studies in this field have been conducted in the U.S., said lead author Anna Choi, research scientist in the Department of Environmental Health at HSPH..."
https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/fluoride-childrens-he...

rated:
Doesn't this come from some Spring in Poland?

Ever spelled EVIAN backwards?

rated:
I am not an expert on springs, but hike through the woods in the lakes region around Poland Maine and you can find water coming up from the ground left and right. Some gush out in a 2 or 3 foot steady gush. It is a special place. Drank a lot of this water.

The bad thing is these wet places make the air thick with mosquitoes.

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