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Good Grades in College?

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I've been thinking a lot about the correlation of people who've had good grades throughout college and their financial success. Obviously, a great GPA helps expose you to better career paths which pay more (mostly), but are there any out there who've built wealth through straight financial smarts (i.e stock market investments, real estate, saving off compounded interest) who would be willing to share their experinces?

Just curious to the type of responses I'll get. Thanks!

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Best post in the thread:

debentureboy (Sep. 19, 2017 @ 6:58a) |

Also the most obvious

rufflesinc (Sep. 19, 2017 @ 7:22a) |

agreed. and I fixed it above.

solarUS (Sep. 19, 2017 @ 8:26a) |

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Yeah, work hard in college and cut your teeth. Then get a decent paying job you're overqualified for so you can slack off and use the extra time to pursue (i.e stock market investments, real estate, saving off compounded interest)

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Did they teach you in college about the usefulness of anecdotal data?

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I got crappy grades in college. I was forced to learn stuff I didn't care about and would never use again to get an engineering degree. I didn't learn a lot of that junk.

I am however really good at logic and math, so I'm doing pretty well financially.

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I don't think college GPA alone will mean too much. Career, major choice and the college you go to are going trump GPA many times.

3.95 GPA at South-by-Southeastern State U majoring in sociology is not going to make you rich.
3.5 GPA in engineering at any top 100 school is going to be worth more.

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You have to be smart/work hard to have a good GPA in a tough program at a highly ranked university. HOWEVER, you can still be smart, but choose not to work hard while in college and have a bad GPA. So while a good GPA likely means something, a bad GPA doesn't necessarily mean the opposite. Plus, after your first job out of college, you can take your GPA off your resume. So it only matters to you in getting that first job. Getting that second job depends more on what/how you did in that first job.

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Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

As meade18 mentioned, getting good grades is an indication, not a guarantee, of someone who is smart/hard working etc. (things that make it likely that you will do well financially).

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I graduated with a 3.0 GPA from a somewhat decent state university in the south.  I have an Information Systems B.A. and a MPA from a private institution in the northeast. I make $120k/year.  My wife makes the same $ and her grades were a hair higher than mine.  She has a B.S. in Psychology and a Master's in HR.  We have friends that graduated with GPAs MUCH higher than ours and they haven't cracked six figures.  I also have college dropout friends that make a LOT more than my wife and I combined.  Anecdotal I know.

Grades matter to a certain degree, but there are so many other variables that will affect your financial success.  Grades are a strong indicator of success, but correlation does not necessarily mean causation.  

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meade18 said:   You have to be smart/work hard to have a good GPA in a tough program at a highly ranked university. HOWEVER, you can still be smart, but choose not to work hard while in college and have a bad GPA. So while a good GPA likely means something, a bad GPA doesn't necessarily mean the opposite.
  a bad GPA means you're not willing to work hard. sounds like someone had a bad GPA in college, couldn't get a good job and chooses to blame it on the minorities. 
Plus, after your first job out of college, you can take your GPA off your resume. So it only matters to you in getting that first job. Getting that second job depends more on what/how you did in that first job.
my second job required even more intensive background check, including all diploma and GPA verification , via third party

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jerosen said:   I don't think college GPA alone will mean too much. Career, major choice and the college you go to are going trump GPA many times.

3.95 GPA at South-by-Southeastern State U majoring in sociology is not going to make you rich.
3.5 GPA in engineering at any top 100 school is going to be worth more.


2.3 GPA in engineering has done well for me.

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I would say an internship is more important than GPA.

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imbatman said:   jerosen said:   I don't think college GPA alone will mean too much. Career, major choice and the college you go to are going trump GPA many times.

3.95 GPA at South-by-Southeastern State U majoring in sociology is not going to make you rich.
3.5 GPA in engineering at any top 100 school is going to be worth more.


2.3 GPA in engineering has done well for me.

Yes but you are Batman.

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I had 3.5 from a private college in Computer Engineering and making low six figures now a days. However...a few of my friends didn't attend a single day of college here but they had good business acumen and were willing to take risks...and they're all doing very well.  One has $5mm equity in residential real estate and another one just bought a lot of 200 gas stations. 

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ach1199 said:   another one just bought a lot of 200 gas stations. 
  how ... how does 200 gas stations come up for sale at once?
However...a few of my friends didn't attend a single day of college here
Not going to college in the first place is not the same as going for four years and getting a bad gpa

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Interesting responses.

I'm going to take it up a step and adjust my question based on previous comments.

What was your GPA in college?
Major?
Age?
At what age did you break six figures (assuming you did)?
Was your financial success through a good career/job, or through your own personal financial smarts?

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RailroadTrack said:   I graduated with a 3.0 GPA from a somewhat decent state university in the south.  I have an Information Systems B.A. and a MPA from a private institution in the northeast. I make $120k/year.  My wife makes the same $ and her grades were a hair higher than mine.  She has a B.S. in Psychology and a Master's in HR.  We have friends that graduated with GPAs MUCH higher than ours and they haven't cracked six figures.  I also have college dropout friends that make a LOT more than my wife and I combined.  Anecdotal I know.

Grades matter to a certain degree, but there are so many other variables that will affect your financial success.  Grades are a strong indicator of success, but correlation does not necessarily mean causation.  

  This is a great response. I'm sure you can relate in saying that your 3.0 GPA is not a result of.."lack of willingness to work hard" like someone else mentioned. 

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fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).
I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?

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fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
 
Note that Bill Gates passed the MATH 55 sequence which some argue is the most difficult undergraduate math course in the United States
Additional info.  

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I helped a foreigner buddy who moved here from overseas with English and writing college papers. To this day, he still can spell 3 letter English words wrong.

Anyway, he now has an engineering degree and is an engineer for the state DOT.

His actual duty every day is to drive around to roadwork and bridge work sites and take photos using a state cell phone of the contractors working to create proof that workers are working.

He says he sleeps a lot in his car. He too is financially successful now owning a custom built solar power house & a 2017 car.

imbatman said:   I got crappy grades in college. I was forced to learn stuff I didn't care about and would never use again to get an engineering degree. I didn't learn a lot of that junk. ... I'm doing pretty well financially.

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JiggleTheHandle said:   I helped a foreigner buddy who moved here from overseas with English and writing college papers. To this day, he still can spell 3 letter English words wrong.

Anyway, he now has an engineering degree and is an engineer for the state DOT.

His actual duty every day is to drive around to roadwork and bridge work sites and take photos using a state cell phone of the contractors working to create proof that workers are working.

He says he sleeps a lot in his car. He too is financially successful now owning a custom built solar power house & a 2017 car.

imbatman said:   I got crappy grades in college. I was forced to learn stuff I didn't care about and would never use again to get an engineering degree. I didn't learn a lot of that junk. ... I'm doing pretty well financially.

  When you have a ton of bureaucracy it's easy for a few individuals to find a way to skate by. 

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.

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kamalktk said:   imbatman said:   jerosen said:   I don't think college GPA alone will mean too much. Career, major choice and the college you go to are going trump GPA many times.

3.95 GPA at South-by-Southeastern State U majoring in sociology is not going to make you rich.
3.5 GPA in engineering at any top 100 school is going to be worth more.


2.3 GPA in engineering has done well for me.

Yes but you are Batman.


Yea. Those late nights were a killer.

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scripta said:   
fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?
 

  Maybe he meant Steve Jobs?

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scripta said:   
fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?

  Example of someone who dropped out of college but one of the most successful persons (at least financially speaking). 

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caterpillar123 said:   
scripta said:   
fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?

  Maybe he meant Steve Jobs?

  Steve Jobs is another example (of someone not finishing college but very successful).

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Anecdotal evidence is so useless for this topic.

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I've always heard the A students end up working for the B students at the company owned by the C student.

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macdave said:   I've always heard the A students end up working for the B students at the company owned by the C student.
  peter principle

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fwuser12 said:   
caterpillar123 said:   
scripta said:   
fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?

  Maybe he meant Steve Jobs?

  Steve Jobs is another example (of someone not finishing college but very successful).

  yeah but he died at 56

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rufflesinc said:   
fwuser12 said:   
caterpillar123 said:   
scripta said:   
fwuser12 said:   Obligatory example: Bill Gates.
(doesnt mean good grades or a college degree dont matter overall).

I'm confused -- obligatory example of what? Someone who got 1590 SAT, went to Harvard, and is uber rich?

  Maybe he meant Steve Jobs?

  Steve Jobs is another example (of someone not finishing college but very successful).

  yeah but he died at 56

  which proves all the theories and studies that show lack of college correlates to earlier mortality.

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The main exception to the rule of good grades lead to higher income is if you come to a fork in the road where you can either do X which leads to financial gain, or get good grades - but you can't do both. I guess it's possible that the many students who took time out of Harvard to start a top 40 band or a major company, may have lowered their GPA in the process. That's an extreme example and I'm sure there are more subtle ones.

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Good grades will help you get a leg up on an ultra competitive and prestigious first job out of college with a large company if you want to go that way. Or at least that's my feeling after 15 ish years in the workforce across 3 companies.

I partied the first 2 years of college and worked full time the last 3. Got a finance degree from cal state, honestly couldn't tell you what my GPA was, probably right at or below 3. I parlayed my full time job into an internal transfer to hq once I graduated and no one ever asked me my GPA. I don't even know that I ever checked my grades the last quarter.

I've since moved through 2 other corps, both smallish, and my degree is on my resume, and no one has ever mentioned it anywhere in the hiring or promotion process, let alone ask for GPA. I've also never asked an entry level person in an interview or anywhere in any process about their GPA.

I have what I'd consider a fairly good sr level analyst job. Broke 100K at 31 or about 9 years after graduation.

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College chicks; football games; college bars; frat parties; mixers; intramural sports... These were a few of my favorite things. Nobody ever asks about someone's college gpa. Go to class. Get decent grades but the life experiences and being around young ambitious ppl are what make college valuable.

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negotiatedsettlement said:   College chicks; football games; college bars; frat parties; mixers; intramural sports... These were a few of my favorite things. Nobody ever asks about someone's college gpa. Go to class. Get decent grades but the life experiences and being around young ambitious ppl are what make college valuable.
  oh lawdy. The true batmans can do all of that and still get 4.0

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Gauss44 said:   The main exception to the rule of good grades lead to higher income is if you come to a fork in the road where you can either do X which leads to financial gain, or get good grades - but you can't do both. I guess it's possible that the many students who took time out of Harvard to start a top 40 band or a major company, may have lowered their GPA in the process. That's an extreme example and I'm sure there are more subtle ones.
  i'm guessing thats not the case for the posters here as we would have seen them humbebrag to that respect

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jerosen said:   I don't think college GPA alone will mean too much. Career, major choice and the college you go to are going trump GPA many times.

3.95 GPA at South-by-Southeastern State U majoring in sociology is not going to make you rich.
3.5 GPA in engineering at any top 100 school is going to be worth more.

  What about trump GPA at Trump University?

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rufflesinc said:   negotiatedsettlement said:   College chicks; football games; college bars; frat parties; mixers; intramural sports... These were a few of my favorite things. Nobody ever asks about someone's college gpa. Go to class. Get decent grades but the life experiences and being around young ambitious ppl are what make college valuable.
  oh lawdy. The true batmans can do all of that and still get 4.0


I didn't get a 4.0

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Don't discount how luck and timing can play a role in your wealth

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There are way more people who dropped out of college and have nothing to show for it than there are those Zuckerberg and Gates'.

Skipping 68 Messages...
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rufflesinc said:   debentureboy said:   Best post in the thread: 
MonkeyingAround said:   Don't discount how luck and timing can play a role in your LIFE
  

Also the most obvious

agreed. and I fixed it above.

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