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TIME = MONEY: Collection of FWF strategies to **SAVE TIME** (even if it costs $)

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Yes I see the owners of coal powered cars hanging out at starbucks and mcdonalds for hours waiting to get enough coal powered charging done to get home.

OTOH I agree it's a champion at using other people's money - I think that's a thread we need - "How to get the most OPM possible with the least investment".

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You're kidding but I love the idea for such a thread.

Here's my first post for the "How to get the most OPM possible with the least investment" thread:

Don't waste money buying coffee. Chase branches have coffee for free in the lobby and will brew more if they are out and you ask.

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Stubtify said:   You're kidding but I love the idea for such a thread.

Here's my first post for the "How to get the most OPM possible with the least investment" thread:

Don't waste money buying coffee. Chase branches have coffee for free in the lobby and will brew more if they are out and you ask.


Most car dealerships have the Keurig (or similar brand) machines that do individual coffee, espresso, hot chocolate, etc for free. Then combine this deal with the thread for money for test driving cars, and you have a small income boost.

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Here's a marginal time saver: Philips Hue (or other "connected") light bulbs. No need to turn on or off individual bulbs. Switch the bulbs on or off with your Smartphone.

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phisher4 said:   Here's a marginal time saver: Philips Hue (or other "connected") light bulbs. No need to turn on or off individual bulbs. Switch the bulbs on or off with your Smartphone.
  
Alexa, shut off the lights.

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phisher4 said:   Here's a marginal time saver: Philips Hue (or other "connected") light bulbs. No need to turn on or off individual bulbs. Switch the bulbs on or off with your Smartphone.
  Even better, set up motion sensors and rules to automatically turn the lights on & off so you don't even have to take out your smartphone or summon Alexa. This may require a smart home hub like SmartThings or Wink.

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telflonmail said:   
phisher4 said:   Here's a marginal time saver: Philips Hue (or other "connected") light bulbs. No need to turn on or off individual bulbs. Switch the bulbs on or off with your Smartphone.
  
Alexa, shut off the lights.

  And then all of a sudden the CIA office gets dark.

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BostonOne said:   
phisher4 said:   Here's a marginal time saver: Philips Hue (or other "connected") light bulbs. No need to turn on or off individual bulbs. Switch the bulbs on or off with your Smartphone.
  Even better, set up motion sensors and rules to automatically turn the lights on & off so you don't even have to take out your smartphone or summon Alexa. This may require a smart home hub like SmartThings or Wink.

  Or just put in CFL/LED and keep the lights always on. Whats the payback period for fancy lights?

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Hopefully on-topic --Although I am as miserly/frugal as they come, I recently indulged in something:  buying pre-mixed fuel/oil for my 2-stroke garden equipment, e.g., chainsaw, weedeater.  Yes, it's probably about 4X as expensive as mixing your own gas & oil, but the pre-mixed stuff provides awesome starting power (rarely more than 1 yank), leading to a much more satisfying user experience.  Good for the backyard putterer like me, likely not cost-effective for a professional.  Anyway, similarly stingy people might want to consider.Link:  http://www.homedepot.com/p/TruSouth-Trufuel-50-1-Pre-Oil-Mix-652...

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Likely mentioned before but it's been a long while since I read through the old posts, but our indulgence was to move to the high desert and get a couple of acres of rocks for a "yard". Saving lots of time not fooling around with a mower. Xeric anyone?

I thought about a chainsaw briefly for some shrub landscaping (creosote bushes and agaves are tough) but settled for a Harbor Freight sawsall tool with a pruning blade. If I had gone the chainsaw route, I would have gone electric.

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tuphat said:   Hopefully on-topic --Although I am as miserly/frugal as they come, I recently indulged in something:  buying pre-mixed fuel/oil for my 2-stroke garden equipment, e.g., chainsaw, weedeater.  Yes, it's probably about 4X as expensive as mixing your own gas & oil, but the pre-mixed stuff provides awesome starting power (rarely more than 1 yank), leading to a much more satisfying user experience.  Good for the backyard putterer like me, likely not cost-effective for a professional.  Anyway, similarly stingy people might want to consider.Link:  http://www.homedepot.com/p/TruSouth-Trufuel-50-1-Pre-Oil-Mix-652...
  I've noticed some of the pros in my area doing this as well even though they go through a lot of it. From what I've read it's nearly impossible to find gas without any ethanol in it now, and it eats away at the rubber in the small engines. I used to go to a gas station that had 91 octane with no ethanol but I'm not too sure that's straight gas either anymore.

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pure-gas.org can tell you If there's any ethanol free gas in your area.

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While the we are on the topic of lawnmower/weedeater. At the end of the season...run run the tank empty. Do not let that Ethanol gas sit of over a winter...Good luck getting it to fire next season.  +1 on the pre-mixed stuff

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I read this here on FW on a thread about someone who was buying a 3 story condo:

Put a box at the top and the bottom of the stairs, anything that belongs downstairs/upstairs and is on the wrong floor goes in the box. Whenever you go up or down the stairs take the box's contents with you.

I've started doing this and I think it has cut down on those 100 or so trips up and down stairs.

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Stubtify said:   I read this here on FW on a thread about someone who was buying a 3 story condo:

Put a box at the top and the bottom of the stairs, anything that belongs downstairs/upstairs and is on the wrong floor goes in the box. Whenever you go up or down the stairs take the box's contents with you.

I've started doing this and I think it has cut down on those 100 or so trips up and down stairs.

Sounds like you are giving up a lot of exercise opportunities while giving yourself boxes to trip over.

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lol, I hate stairs so make a special effort to avoid living in places that have them. But my last house had an upstairs and a full basement and I did the box trick all the time.

Back to the laundry, if you don't pay to have your laundry done and hang out your clothes to dry, you can put your dress shirts on a hanger and then put the hanger on the clothesline. You may need to pin the hanger somehow, or just park the hangers between other items. When dry, they are ready for the closet.

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As we all know time is gold and every minute must be spend wisely. With regards to cost effectiveness wherein less money to be spend not jeopardizing the effectivity of the job done, it is also wise enough to work without devoting entirely your time to the project. It is because your personal time with your family will be affected and as well deteriorate your mind and health. I believe in order to be an effective leader/manager/owner, you must know how to value work efforts and acknowledge the effectivity of your subordinates. Distribute the work done for today to your team, not really all the jobs to be finish solely rely on your effort. Or you may consider hiring someone who has enough skills specially in your project-based jobs.

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phisher4 said:   This probably saves time but definitely not money: Amazon Dash buttons. Anyone use them? Are they worth it?
  
Considering the way Amazon jimmyjacks around with prices, I wouldn't advise using it.

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canoer said:   
Back to the laundry, if you don't pay to have your laundry done and hang out your clothes to dry, you can put your dress shirts on a hanger and then put the hanger on the clothesline. You may need to pin the hanger somehow, or just park the hangers between other items. When dry, they are ready for the closet.

  why would anyone not pay for dress shirts to be laundered and ironed, given this thread?

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Very true. But (there's always a but, eh?), there are lots of time saving tips in here for those chores that you do anyway. For example, I don't commute so it saves time for me to avoid driving to the cleaners and I'm in the outskirts where the cleaners won't pickup and deliver.

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rufflesinc said:   
canoer said:   
Back to the laundry, if you don't pay to have your laundry done and hang out your clothes to dry, you can put your dress shirts on a hanger and then put the hanger on the clothesline. You may need to pin the hanger somehow, or just park the hangers between other items. When dry, they are ready for the closet.

  why would anyone not pay for dress shirts to be laundered and ironed, given this thread?

  I am on a budget and am all for saving time. I used to clean my dress shirts in the washing machine too cheap to have them dry cleaned. That is, until I discovered that I could get 2 wears out of them when they are dry cleaned. After wearing dress shirts cleaned at the cleaners I noticed they were still perfectly clean and wrinkle-free at the end of the day. This is not the case after wearing shirts I'd washed in the machine at home. Bonus, my dress shirts last longer and don't fade when dry cleaned. This might not work for some, like those who sweat a lot, or have a dirty job.

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FountainRunner57 said:   
rufflesinc said:   
canoer said:   
Back to the laundry, if you don't pay to have your laundry done and hang out your clothes to dry, you can put your dress shirts on a hanger and then put the hanger on the clothesline. You may need to pin the hanger somehow, or just park the hangers between other items. When dry, they are ready for the closet.

  why would anyone not pay for dress shirts to be laundered and ironed, given this thread?

  I am on a budget and am all for saving time. I used to clean my dress shirts in the washing machine too cheap to have them dry cleaned. That is, until I discovered that I could get 2 wears out of them when they are dry cleaned. After wearing dress shirts cleaned at the cleaners I noticed they were still perfectly clean and wrinkle-free at the end of the day. This is not the case after wearing shirts I'd washed in the machine at home. Bonus, my dress shirts last longer and don't fade when dry cleaned. This might not work for some, like those who sweat a lot, or have a dirty job.

  I think that's called starch.... you can still use starch when doing your laundry at home.

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sfchris said:   
phisher4 said:   This probably saves time but definitely not money: Amazon Dash buttons. Anyone use them? Are they worth it?
  
Considering the way Amazon jimmyjacks around with prices, I wouldn't advise using it.

  Green for jimmyjack.  I also like the word "finagle."

Dash buttons occasionally have a discount associated with their (first time) use.  If it's for a low-cost item, then the discount may absorb any jimmyjacking that may occur.

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ercme said:   
FountainRunner57 said:   
rufflesinc said:   
canoer said:   
Back to the laundry, if you don't pay to have your laundry done and hang out your clothes to dry, you can put your dress shirts on a hanger and then put the hanger on the clothesline. You may need to pin the hanger somehow, or just park the hangers between other items. When dry, they are ready for the closet.

  why would anyone not pay for dress shirts to be laundered and ironed, given this thread?

  I am on a budget and am all for saving time. I used to clean my dress shirts in the washing machine too cheap to have them dry cleaned. That is, until I discovered that I could get 2 wears out of them when they are dry cleaned. After wearing dress shirts cleaned at the cleaners I noticed they were still perfectly clean and wrinkle-free at the end of the day. This is not the case after wearing shirts I'd washed in the machine at home. Bonus, my dress shirts last longer and don't fade when dry cleaned. This might not work for some, like those who sweat a lot, or have a dirty job.

  I think that's called starch.... you can still use starch when doing your laundry at home.

  I know what starch is and use it every time I iron. That's not what makes the difference. I've found my clothes are just handled better and last longer when in the hands of the cleaners. Saves time and money over the long term. Results might vary.

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