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http://www.scartreatment.co.uk/freesample.html 

reduces the appearance of stretch marks & scars

Moderator Comment: Members of our community have alerted us to the questionable nature of this deal. While we do not condone any unethical or illegal behavior, we believe discussion and debate helps our community make informed decisions. Please read, comment if you'd like, and proceed with caution. — Oct. 23, 2016 @ 6:40pm
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rated:
thanks

rated:
thanks MrsGuin - green for you!!

rated:

Pic 2 (497.61kB)
Disclaimer

Pic 1 (163.27kB)
Disclaimer
Another favorite of scammers is hacking a legitimate website and inserting a fake freebie link. Lot's of red flags here, starting with the 'freesample' button on the alleged 'sample' page. <---------See attached images to left. Pic 1 is the sample page, with a button that says freesamples at the bottom of the column. For starters, it's not even formatted like the other buttons, it should read 'Free Samples', not 'freesamples'. 'freesamples' is not a word in the English language, it's 2 separate words. A legitimate offer would use the correct grammar and format, scammers are sloppy. Then look at pic 2, where's the 'freesamples' button???? Pic 2 is of the homepage, no button. In fact, the fake 'freesamples' button does not show up on any page, except the alleged sample page.

From the link in the OP, it's obvious that the website is a British entity, co.uk is a United Kingdom suffix. It is strictly an educational website, as indicated on the disclaimer** below the link column.  The product page is http://kelocote.com/, and if actual samples were being offered to US citizens, it would be via the manufacturers website, not a British educational one.. Scammers like to Target the US because of the sheer numbers of potential requests. They can quickly acquire their spam/junk mail list to sell to marketers worldwide for money. If this was legitimate, it would be in the link column on every page, not only the sample form page. Even more so, a US offer (or any offer) would be on a product website, not an educational one. An educational one would link back to the product website.


** This website has been possible due to an Educational grant provided by Sinclair Pharmaceuticals, providers of Kelo-Cote scar Gel.  We would like to thank Sinclair Pharmaceuticals for thier generous support

rated:
Nothing you've said proves anything. Even legit offers have typos like missing the space between free & samples. You're just grasping at straws.

rated:
lisa58 said:   Nothing you've said proves anything. Even legit offers have typos like missing the space between free & samples. You're just grasping at straws.
  

You do know that alts are not allowed on FW, better hope you don't get the ban stick. You are way too transparent....


ETA: See that warning in the green box of the OP? Mods don't issue them willy-nilly, that's why when you select "scam" from the vote choices, you are asked to explain. Same with the Fake Freebie sticky, all posts and edits to the QS are moderated, they are posted upon review of the moderators. The evidence strongly weighs on this being a scam, if FW thought I was grasping at straws, they would ask for more details (a few times, they have - and when I have provided additional info to support my position, the green warning box went up). If you don't think it belongs there, by all means, send a mod alert with your reason as to why you feel this is legit. I will bet you that if I were to contact both websites, they would probably confirm that the offer isn't theirs. The Fake Freebies sticky has numerous fake freebies where I did just that, and provided the emails & FB PM's where they confirmed the fake offer. I will put my reputation on the line, over some 'newbie' (actually an alt) who offers no credible evidence whatsoever.

rated:
SweetClover said:   Another favorite of scammers is hacking a legitimate website and inserting a fake freebie link. Lot's of red flags here, starting with the 'freesample' button on the alleged 'sample' page. <---------See attached images to left. Pic 1 is the sample page, with a button that says freesamples at the bottom of the column. For starters, it's not even formatted like the other buttons, it should read 'Free Samples', not 'freesamples'. 'freesamples' is not a word in the English language, it's 2 separate words. A legitimate offer would use the correct grammar and format, scammers are sloppy. Then look at pic 2, where's the 'freesamples' button???? Pic 2 is of the homepage, no button. In fact, the fake 'freesamples' button does not show up on any page, except the alleged sample page.

From the link in the OP, it's obvious that the website is a British entity, co.uk is a United Kingdom suffix. It is strictly an educational website, as indicated on the disclaimer** below the link column.  The product page is http://kelocote.com/, and if actual samples were being offered to US citizens, it would be via the manufacturers website, not a British educational one.. Scammers like to Target the US because of the sheer numbers of potential requests. They can quickly acquire their spam/junk mail list to sell to marketers worldwide for money. If this was legitimate, it would be in the link column on every page, not only the sample form page. Even more so, a US offer (or any offer) would be on a product website, not an educational one. An educational one would link back to the product website.

** This website has been possible due to an Educational grant provided by Sinclair Pharmaceuticals, providers of Kelo-Cote scar Gel.  We would like to thank Sinclair Pharmaceuticals for thier generous support


Thanks for watching out for us. These scams are becoming more and more common everyday.

rated:
SweetClover said:   
lisa58 said:   Nothing you've said proves anything. Even legit offers have typos like missing the space between free & samples. You're just grasping at straws.
  

You do know that alts are not allowed on FW, better hope you don't get the ban stick. You are way too transparent....


ETA: See that warning in the green box of the OP? Mods don't issue them willy-nilly, that's why when you select "scam" from the vote choices, you are asked to explain. Same with the Fake Freebie sticky, all posts and edits to the QS are moderated, they are posted upon review of the moderators. The evidence strongly weighs on this being a scam, if FW thought I was grasping at straws, they would ask for more details (a few times, they have - and when I have provided additional info to support my position, the green warning box went up). If you don't think it belongs there, by all means, send a mod alert with your reason as to why you feel this is legit. I will bet you that if I were to contact both websites, they would probably confirm that the offer isn't theirs. The Fake Freebies sticky has numerous fake freebies where I did just that, and provided the emails & FB PM's where they confirmed the fake offer. I will put my reputation on the line, over some 'newbie' (actually an alt) who offers no credible evidence whatsoever.

  
Great minds think alike, because I did just that, earlier this morning... and contacted the merchant via their "Contact" form, to see if they'll confirm the validity of this alleged "freesample" so we can finally put this to bed.
(Indeed... pretty pompous coming from a 'newbie.'  Bwahahaha!)
 

rated:
Site looks a little iffy to me.

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