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POKEMON (42.69kB)
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what is the cheapest plan for a person who rarely calls or text but want internet so can play pokemon go?

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micxxx said:   what is the cheapest plan for a person who rarely calls or text but want internet so can play pokemon go?
  i don't know if prepaids get the same perk, but the "WalMart" plan might be really good for your needs. 100 min voice, unlimited text and data (throttled down after 5gb) for $30/month. since it is prepaid, there is no tax, etc, and often you can buy credit to transfer into your account for a steep discount on fleabay. i used to buy ~$95 worth of prepaid credit for about $30. it worked out to about $10/month. voice wasn't a problem, as i used google voice as a default, so it always did voip (data). the only issue was that you couldn't use the google voice voicemail... cannot do forwarding on prepaid accounts. 

it is hard to find on the t-mo site (they do sell it, if you can find it), but WalMart has it (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tmobile-30-Wireless-Airtime-Card/15443... hope this helps.

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When you do not want to open the connection and found that there is no detailed introduction, not a good phenomenon

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Muggers who like to steal phones from distracted users cheer at the news.

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Link And more distracted drivers and pedestrians

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I would also like to know if you can play Pokemon go?

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I checked my data yesterday and yes it went up, but still living with in the Ring+ data limits.

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Doesn't work with the free iPad plans

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golgo1313 said:   
micxxx said:   what is the cheapest plan for a person who rarely calls or text but want internet so can play pokemon go?
  i don't know if prepaids get the same perk, but the "WalMart " plan might be really good for your needs. 100 min voice, unlimited text and data (throttled down after 5gb) for $30/month. since it is prepaid, there is no tax, etc, and often you can buy credit to transfer into your account for a steep discount on fleabay. i used to buy ~$95 worth of prepaid credit for about $30. it worked out to about $10/month. voice wasn't a problem, as i used google voice as a default, so it always did voip (data). the only issue was that you couldn't use the google voice voicemail... cannot do forwarding on prepaid accounts. 

it is hard to find on the t-mo site (they do sell it, if you can find it), but WalMart has it (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tmobile-30-Wireless-Airtime-Card/15443... hope this helps.

  I've bought refill cards and also used my cc to directly refill my WalMart plan.I've always be charged tax.

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sackoloot said:   
golgo1313 said:   
micxxx said:   what is the cheapest plan for a person who rarely calls or text but want internet so can play pokemon go?
  i don't know if prepaids get the same perk, but the "WalMart " plan might be really good for your needs. 100 min voice, unlimited text and data (throttled down after 5gb) for $30/month. since it is prepaid, there is no tax, etc, and often you can buy credit to transfer into your account for a steep discount on fleabay. i used to buy ~$95 worth of prepaid credit for about $30. it worked out to about $10/month. voice wasn't a problem, as i used google voice as a default, so it always did voip (data). the only issue was that you couldn't use the google voice voicemail... cannot do forwarding on prepaid accounts. 

it is hard to find on the t-mo site (they do sell it, if you can find it), but WalMart has it (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tmobile-30-Wireless-Airtime-Card/15443... hope this helps.

  I've bought refill cards and also used my cc to directly refill my WalMart plan.I've always be charged tax.

  Here it is on the T-Mobile site: http://prepaid-phones.t-mobile.com/other-prepaid-plans

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I think this is a amazing move by T-Mobile to cash in on pop culture

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Great to know, now I won't feel so guilty when I'm out draining precious data

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RIP net neutrality

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abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

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astroXP said:   
abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

  I think it is a little concerning that my cell provider know what apps I use.  It is nice they give free data, if I used this game, but I don't think I want that granular level of detail with my phone company.  Or really anyone else.

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Granted this is a much smaller crowd, but Pokemon Go is from the same company that created Ingress. All the pokestops are portals from the Ingress game.

My thought is, could T-Mobile tell the difference between Pokemon data and Ingress data.

My guess is that Ingress players will probably get the same free data.

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abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  Yes, but this isn't fixed service, it's mobile. The wireless providers have always been given much more leeway to throttle specific data because network congestion is a much more pressing issue for them.
They were included in the net neutrality decision though, so it'll be interesting to see how this plays out. My guess is that as long as TMO doesn't have a financial stake in Pokemon, the FCC will probably let it go.

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edBrdFfCvUybhoLfkqvi said:   
astroXP said:   
abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

  I think it is a little concerning that my cell provider know what apps I use.  It is nice they give free data, if I used this game, but I don't think I want that granular level of detail with my phone company.  Or really anyone else.

  Oh, they know a lot more than that! They are the ones that provide your phone with the GPS data. Basically, they know your position on this earth down to a few  feet at all times that you're carrying the phone.
They also know what connections you're making on the internet, since they have to route your data.
Given that they also have your personal info, credit card info, SS number etc, they can identify your every move in real time, and could build up a complete database about you. Good thing we live in a democracy where that data isn't being used against us by some secret police force.

I am surprised though at the complete lack of outcry when Location Services was mandated by the government approx 10 years ago, ostensibly so that 911 services could automatically know where you placed an emergency call from. It's a huge invasion of privacy, since the government can use it to track you in real time, yet nobody said a word.
I expected that at least the people worried about a tyranny of the federal government, and a "New World Order" would start screaming. My guess is that they just aren't sophisticated enough to understand the issue.
It's ironic that these people arm themselves and think that they're immune from government surveillance by not having bank accounts or driver licenses, yet don't even realize that the government knows every time they go to the bathroom.

It shows how easily a modern dictatorship could watch a country's population without the masses of non-technical people even knowing it was happening
 

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edBrdFfCvUybhoLfkqvi said:   
astroXP said:   
abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

  I think it is a little concerning that my cell provider know what apps I use.  It is nice they give free data, if I used this game, but I don't think I want that granular level of detail with my phone company.  Or really anyone else.

  
This may or may not be news to you, but it's fairly easy to get a granular level of detail of your location already without Pokemon Go.  

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canoeguy1 said:   
edBrdFfCvUybhoLfkqvi said:   
astroXP said:   
abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

  I think it is a little concerning that my cell provider know what apps I use.  It is nice they give free data, if I used this game, but I don't think I want that granular level of detail with my phone company.  Or really anyone else.

I am surprised though at the complete lack of outcry when Location Services was mandated by the government approx 10 years ago, ostensibly so that 911 services could automatically know where you placed an emergency call from. It's a huge invasion of privacy, since the government can use it to track you in real time, yet nobody said a word. I expected that at least the people worried about a the tyranny of the federal government, and a "New World Order" would start screaming. My guess is that they just aren't sophisticated enough to understand the issue.
 

  They are too busy making tinfoil hats and looking for ways to detect the chemtrails from black helicopters.

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canoeguy1 said:   
edBrdFfCvUybhoLfkqvi said:   
astroXP said:   
abbazaba2 said:   RIP net neutrality
  
For one app? I think you are exaggerating mate

  I think it is a little concerning that my cell provider know what apps I use.  It is nice they give free data, if I used this game, but I don't think I want that granular level of detail with my phone company.  Or really anyone else.

  Oh, they know a lot more than that! They are the ones that provide your phone with the GPS data. Basically, they know your position on this earth down to a few  feet at all times that you're carrying the phone.
They also know what connections you're making on the internet, since they have to route your data.
Given that they also have your personal info, credit card info, SS number etc, they can identify your every move in real time, and could build up a complete database about you. Good thing we live in a democracy where that data isn't being used against us by some secret police force.

I am surprised though at the complete lack of outcry when Location Services was mandated by the government approx 10 years ago, ostensibly so that 911 services could automatically know where you placed an emergency call from. It's a huge invasion of privacy, since the government can use it to track you in real time, yet nobody said a word.
I expected that at least the people worried about a tyranny of the federal government, and a "New World Order" would start screaming. My guess is that they just aren't sophisticated enough to understand the issue.
It's ironic that these people arm themselves and think that they're immune from government surveillance by not having bank accounts or driver licenses, yet don't even realize that the government knows every time they go to the bathroom.

It shows how easily a modern dictatorship could watch a country's population without the masses of non-technical people even knowing it was happening

I get so many strange looks when I pull out my old old old non-smart-phone Motorola flip phone on a Verizon plan.  I can make and answer calls, and it takes messages.  Even better are the stares when my husband uses his older-than-dirt candybar phone which runs on T-Mobile - buy a prepaid card and load on minutes every 3 or 4 months.  We have a landline too through our local rural co-op phone company.   I'm sure we're not entirely below the radar, but I would suspect we're probably at the low end of it. 

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 I get so many strange looks when I pull out my old old old non-smart-phone Motorola flip phone on a Verizon plan.  I can make and answer calls, and it takes messages.  Even better are the stares when my husband uses his older-than-dirt candybar phone which runs on T-Mobile - buy a prepaid card and load on minutes every 3 or 4 months.  We have a landline too through our local rural co-op phone company.   I'm sure we're not entirely below the radar, but I would suspect we're probably at the low end of it. 
  You're not. A phone without built-in GPS can be triangulated from multiple basestations using TDOA (Time Difference of Arrival). Not quite as accurate, but still within 200 feet or so depending on how many basesations can "see" the phone, and what their geometric layout is.

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[quote]They are the ones that provide your phone with the GPS data[/quote]
They may be able to track you in lots of ways, but no to this one.
Most modern cell phones include a GPS receiver, so you get the location data locally, from the GPS network.
As GPS position is usually overkill, lots of systems let you use "approximate" position, which is the location of the wifi you are connected to, verified regularly by GPS from any of the persons connected.

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sackoloot said:   
golgo1313 said:   
micxxx said:   what is the cheapest plan for a person who rarely calls or text but want internet so can play pokemon go?
  i don't know if prepaids get the same perk, but the "WalMart " plan might be really good for your needs. 100 min voice, unlimited text and data (throttled down after 5gb) for $30/month. since it is prepaid, there is no tax, etc, and often you can buy credit to transfer into your account for a steep discount on fleabay. i used to buy ~$95 worth of prepaid credit for about $30. it worked out to about $10/month. voice wasn't a problem, as i used google voice as a default, so it always did voip (data). the only issue was that you couldn't use the google voice voicemail... cannot do forwarding on prepaid accounts. 

it is hard to find on the t-mo site (they do sell it, if you can find it), but WalMart has it (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Tmobile-30-Wireless-Airtime-Card/15443... hope this helps.

  I've bought refill cards and also used my cc to directly refill my WalMart plan.I've always be charged tax.

  they recently started charging me tax. for the past 2 years, they didn't, but the past 3 months they have been charging me tax

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Frenchy2k1 said:   
They are the ones that provide your phone with the GPS data
They may be able to track you in lots of ways, but no to this one.
Most modern cell phones include a GPS receiver, so you get the location data locally, from the GPS network.
As GPS position is usually overkill, lots of systems let you use "approximate" position, which is the location of the wifi you are connected to, verified regularly by GPS from any of the persons connected.

  Not quite correct. The system provides ephemeris data to the phone, so that the GPS receiver in the phone is able to pick up the GPS signal more easily. It basically makes the receiver more sensitive, and gives the receiver info about which satellites will be overhead, what codes to use to pick up their signal etc. This is critical because in many instances (indoors for example), the phone has a very weak signal from the satellites.
The basestation can also simulate a GPS satellite, and thus provide better triangulation for the phone.

Using only the serving celltower as location is quite inaccurate, since the cellsite footprint can span a mile or more in suburban/rural areas, so it's a last resort. If you're connected to Wifi, and the exact location of the Wifi transmitter is known to the system (not your home WiFI for example), then that could be used as well.

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BTW, this isn't that big a deal anyway. Pokemon Go uses only about 10mb/hour while actively playing.

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